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Full text of "Handbook on programs of the U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare /"

196&45 Edition: Ihtll 



Handbook on 



PROGRAMS 



OF THE 



US. Department of 
Health, Education, f 
and Welfare 




Organization 
and Fact Sheets 



OFFICE OF THK SECRETARY 

OFFICE OF PROGRAM ANALYSIS 



Anthony J. Cclchrcv/t, Secretary 
Wilbur J, Cohen, I Irtder Secretary 



.Linus M Quiglcy, Assistant .Vvrcurv 
Ruf'us B Milcs.Jr., Assist.mt Secretary 

for Administration 




HANDBOOK on PROGRAMS 
of the 
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE 

Anthony J. Celebrezze, Secretary 

Wilbur J. Cohen, Under Secretary 

Irvin E. Walker, Richard C. Simonson, 

Special Assistant and Program Analysis Officer 

Director, Office of Program Analysis 

Vera Cotton, Staff Assistant 



Staff Officers and Heads of Operating Agencies 

Philip H. Des Marais, Acting Assistant Secretary ({or Legislation) 

James M. Quigley, Assistant Secretary 

Edward W. Dempsey, Special Assistant for Health and Medical Affairs 

Harold R. Levy, Assistant to the Secretary (for Public Affairs) 

Alanson W. Willcox, General Counsel 

Rufus E. Miles, Jr., Assistant Secretary for Administration 

F. Robert Meier, Executive Assistant to the Secretary 

Harvey A. Bush, Director of Public Information 

Harold B. Siegel, Acting Director of Office of Field Administration 

Francis Keppel, Commissioner of Education 

George P. Larrick, Commissioner of Food and Drugs 

Luther L. Terry, Surgeon General, Public Health Service 

Dale C. Cameron, Superintendent, Saint Elizabeths Hospital 

Robert M. Ball, Commissioner of Social Security 

Mary E. Switzer, Commissioner of Vocational Rehabilitation 

Ellen Winston, Commissioner of Welfare 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office 
Washington, D.C., 20402 - Price $1.75 



'■/*. 



Library 

National Institutes of Health 

3ethesda, Maryland 20014 



FOREWORD ^Ljjf 



The programs of the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare are responses to human needs as 
ancient as disease, illiteracy, and dependency. They are responses to challenges as modern as atomic energy. 

Over the past five years, these programs have increased in number and in scope to cope with a backlog 
of unmet needs, to keep pace with population growth, and to deal with the effects of rapid social and economic 
change. One measure of this growth is the increase in appropriations since 1960: threefold for educotlon and 
consumer protection; twofold for health and rehabilitation. An increasing share of funds for welfare programs 
has gone into the development of services to reduce or prevent dependency. Social security programs have 
been improved to increase protection and extend it to many additional people against loss of income from dis- 
ability, retirement, and death of wage earners. 

Growth and expansion of programs have been matched by a deepening awareness of the special needs of 
the di sadvan toged--those who, because of physical, mental, educationol or economic handicaps, are unable to 
realize their full potential for meaningful living. The provision of the social, educationol, health and rehabili- 
tative services these people need calls for trained manpower and innovation. Through research and demon- 
stration projects and support for graduate and professional training, the Department has contributed to the im- 
proved quality of services. 

Although the total supply of the Nation's manpower is being increased and its skills up-graded through 
such programs as vocational and technical education, education in the health related professions and occupa- 
tions, and expansion of higher education facilities, much is still to be done if the Nation's manpower resources 
in health, education, and welfare ore to improve sufficiently to meet the challenge that lies ahead. 

Progress has been gained both through direct Federal operations and through grants-in-aid, technical 
assistance, and other cooperative relationships with States and local governments and with voluntary organ- 
izations. From the beginning, our Federal system has relied on both public and non-governmental action to 
further health, education, ond welfare requirements at National, State, and local levels. 

In the pages which follow are five-year records, program-by-program, of the recent fruits of this prag- 
matic tradition. However, these records should be windows to the future rather than mirrors of the past. For 
each program area there are still problems to be solved and needs to be met. We should see the goals still to 
be reached as challenges not alone to this Department, but to the FederoL-State community partnership. 



Aj^tUlJs\as^> 



(kZo-^>vv« 



Wi Ibur J. Cohen 

Under Secretary of Heolth, Education, ond Welfare 



II - i 






/ 






Handbook On 

PROGRAMS OF THE U. S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE 

PART II 

- ORGANIZATION AND FACT SHEETS - 

Explanatory Note 

196^-1965 

The Handbook on Programs consists of two parts. Part I includes a general 
introduction and summarizes the major program and legislative developments for 
the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. Part II describes each 
major organization of the Department and provides information on a program- 
by-program basis. Part II may be used alone or in combination with Part I. 

The opening chapter of Part II is followed by a chapter for each 
operating agency in alphabetical sequence. Each agency chapter provides a 
digest of the relevant legislation and narrative and statistical fact 
sheets for each program. 

The topics for the narrative fact sheets for programs are: program 
objectives, extent of problem, present program scope, legal basis, source 
of funds, advisory groups and recent changes. 

The topics for statistical summary sheets for programs are: 
name of the head of the program, distribution of personnel as of the end of 
the fiscal year 1964, paid employment in recent years, funds available for 
recent years and estimated for the fiscal year 1965 on the basis of 
appropriations made by October 19^4, and selected program statistics for 
recent years . Funds actually obligated are also shown when they vary 
substantially from funds appropriated and when construction programs are 
described. 

In the fact sheets for major units of the Department, data on personnel 
and funds are given on an organizational basis. In the program fact sheets, 
funds and personnel are tabulated insofar as possible on a program basis. 
Since some of the appropriation schedules correspond neither to organizational 
units nor to individual programs, and since funds transferred from other 
agencies are included in this document and not in the budget total for the 
Department, it is not possible in most instances to compare directly "funds 
available", as given in the fact sheets, with amounts carried in the budget. 

Employment data are generally fiscal year-end figures as reported to the 
Civil Service Commission and include part-time and intermittent employees as 
well as full-time paid employees. For some of the individual programs year- 
end personnel data are not available, especially for prior years. In these 
cases average employment figures, as reported to the Bureau of the Budget, 
were used. In all cases, however, allocations of personnel and funds by 
program have been made in a manner calculated to reflect the scope of the 
various programs. 



II - 1 



Acknowledgments 

Personnel of operating agencies and major staff offices of the Office 
of the Secretary compiled and wrote most of the information in the first 
Part and all of the fact sheets and related statements in Part II. 
Their generous assistance, as well as that of the fiscal management and 
legal staff of the Department who checked and amplified the financial data 
and legal aspects, is gratefully acknowledged. The contributors were so 
numerous that 'it is not feasible to list them all. 

The assistance of the following individuals is especially acknowledged 
because they guided the work and presented the materials for their entire 
agencies. During the preparation of the Handbook their assignments were: 

Robert L. Veazey, Assistant for Civil Defense, Office of Field 

Administration, Office of the Secretary 
Herman R. Allen, Director, Publications Branch, Office of Information, 

Office of Education 
Edward J. Chapin, Chief, Editorial Services Branch, Food and Drug 

Administration 
Margie Rose, Public Health Analyst, Division of Public Health Methods, 

Public Health Service 
Alexander E. Kovach, Management Analyst, Management Analysis Section, 

Saint Elizabeths Hospital 
Laverne. K. Jung, Supervisory Management Analyst, Management Analysis 

Branch, Division of Management, Social Security Administration 
Margaret P. Bray, Chief, Division of Personnel and Administrative Services, 

Vocational Rehabilitation Administration 
Eugene V. Saunders, Office of the Executive Officer, Office of the 

Commissioner, Welfare Administration. 



II - 2 



PROGRAMS 
OF THE 

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AMD WELFARE 

PART II 

ORGANIZATION AND FACT SHEETS 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

Foreword - Statement by the Secretary II- i 

Explanatory Note II-l 

Departmental Summary 

and Office of the Secretary II- 5 

Office of Education 11-25 

Food and Drug Administration II-89 

Public Health Service 11-105 

Saint Elizabeths Hospital 11-207 

Social Security Administration 11-215 

Vocational Rehabilitation Administration 11-231 

Welfare Administration 11-21+ 3 



II 



PROGRAMS 



OF THE 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE 

PART II 
Departmental Summary and 
Office of the Secretary 
CHAPTER TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

Departmental Responsibilities II- 7 

Office of the Secretary (OS) II- 7 

Regions and Field Establishments II-1 

Personnel Statistics II-1 2 

Funds II-1 3 

Office of Field Administration (OFA)-OS II-1 h 

Surplus Property Utilization - OFA II-1 6 

Related Educational Institutions 

American Printing House for the Blind II-1 8 

Gallaudet College 11-20 

Howard University 11-23 



II - 5 



Departmental Summary and Office of the Secretary 

DEPARTMENT The functions of the Department are 

RESPONSI- performed by the Office of the 

BILITIES Secretary and by seven operating agencies: 

Office of Education 

Food and Drug Administration 

Public Health Service 

Saint Elizabeths Hospital 

Social Security Administration 

Vocational Rehabilitation Administration 

Welfare Administration 

OFFICE OF The activities of the Department are directed by the Secretary. 
THE Other officials of the Department are the Under Secretary, 
SECRETARY Assistant Secretary (for Legislation), Assistant Secretary, 
(May I965) Special Assistant for Health and Medical Affairs, Executive 

Assistant to the Secretary, Assistant to the Secretary (Public 
Affairs), General Counsel, Assistant Secretary for Administra- 
tion, Director of Public Information, and Director of Field 
Administration. 

The Under Secretary serves as Acting Secretary in the absence 
of the Secretary and performs on behalf of the Secretary such 
functions and duties as the Secretary may designate. He is 
responsible for coordination of the Department's budget, 
administrative, and field management activities; he coordi- 
nates programs on migratory labor, area development, manpower 
development and training, educational television, and develops 
special Departmental projects. He is also responsible for the 
civil defense and internal security programs of the Department. 

The Assistant Secretary (Legislation) , in cooperation with 
operating agency heads, is responsible for: the development, 
coordination, and presentation of the Department's legislative 
program to the Bureau of the Budget and Congress, including 
supporting testimony; Congressional Liaison activities of the 
Department; coordination of mental retardation programs of the 
Department through the Secretary's Committee on Mental Retarda- 
tion; coordination of the alcoholism programs of the Department 
through the Secretary's Committee on Alcoholism; and under him 
the Office of Program Analysis assists in the identification 
and analysis of major current and emerging policy issues, 
problems, and gaps in programs, and recommends policy formula- 
tion and program action. The Office advises on interdepartmen- 
tal relationships, maintains liaison with foundations, issues 
reports on program developments, and appraises Federal-State 
relationships. It coordinates Departmental interests in 
matters that cut across agency lines of responsibility, promotes 
the coordination and improvement of statistical programs within 
the Department, and participates in task forces on major social 
problems . 



II - 7 



The Assistant Secretary has the responsibility for the guidance and 
coordination of the Water Pollution Control and Air Pollution Control 
Programs and of the international programs of the Department . He serves 
as principal adviser to, and where possible acts for, the Secretary with 
regard to these programs and activities and with regard to minority group 
relationships. He serves as chairman of the Department's Patents Board, 

The Special Assistant for Health and Medical Affairs is staff adviser to 
the secretary in connection with broad health and medical policy matters, 
and coordinates health and medical programs and scientific activities 
of the Department with special emphasis upon program development and 
legislative proposals. 

The Executive Assistant to the Secretary is the immediate administrative 
assistant to the Secretary, and is responsible for coordinating official 
matters requiring the Secretary's attention and approval. He assures 
consideration of the Secretary's views regarding Departmental programs, 
and maintains liaison between the Cabinet secretariat and the Secretary 
and his staff. 

The Assistant to the Secretary for Public Affairs is the Secretary's 
principal staff adviser on departmental public relations policy and on 
all matters relating to the public relations and public information 
activities of the Secretary. 

The General Counsel is responsible for legal advice to the Secretary and 
other officials of the Department, The Office of General Counsel, under 
his supervision, furnishes legal service to all units of the Department, 
and participates in the formulation and clearance of the Department's 
legislative program. 

The Assistant Secretary for Administration is responsible for the Office 

of Administration, which advises the Secretary on administration and 

coordinates management responsibilities and considerations with program 

policies and operations. The Office performs all of the functions of 

the Secretary in the field of administrative and financial management; 

provides departmentwide coordination, leadership, and guidance on 

budgetary and financial management, personnel management, organization, 

administrative management, external and internal audits, and administra- 
tive services. 

The Director of Public Information is the chief information officer of the 
Department; advises the Secretary on Department policies and operations 
involving public information, publications, reports, and other informa- 
tion matters; and directs the Office of Public Information, which coordi- 
nates all information policies, services, and activities of the 
Department. 

(May 1965) 



II - 8 



The Director of Field Administration is responsible for the 
Office of Field Administration, which serves as principal 
adviser to the Secretary in the coordination of the field 
activities of the Department. The Office administers a 
program of assistance to the States in the administration 
of merit systems for personnel involved in grant-in-aid 
programs and the statutory functions of the Secretary 
with respect to surplus property utilization. 

FIELD The Department has nine regional offices. Each regional 
ORGANI- office is headed by a Regional Director who is the 
ZATION Secretary's representative within the region. The Regional 
Directors have the responsibility of carrying out Department 
policies of providing leadership, coordination, evaluation, 
and general administrative supervision of all program 
representatives located in the regional offices. They are 
also responsible for periodic review of field establishments. 
The following have representation in the regional offices: 
Office of the Secretary (General Counsel, Grant- in- Aid 
Audits, Merit Systems, and Surplus Property Utilization), 
Public Health Service, Office of Education, Social Security 
Administration, Welfare Administration, and the 
Vocational Rehabilitation Administration. The regional program 
representatives are under the general administrative super- 
vision of the Director but receive technical direction from 
the appropriate headquarters office or bureau. The Food and 
Drug Administration district offices are part of the regional 
organization, but no Food and Drug representatives are 
stationed in the regional offices. 

(May 1965) 



II - 9 



The regional offices are as follows (May 1965): 



Region States Served 

I Connecticut, Maine, 
Massachusetts, New- 
Hampshire, Rhode 
Island, Vermont 

II Delaware, New Jersey, 
New York, Pennsylvania 



III District of Columbia, 
Kentucky, Maryland, 
North Carolina, 
Virginia, West Virginia 
Puerto Rico, and the 
Virgin Islands 

IV Alabama, Florida, 

Georgia, Mississippi, 
South Carolina, 
Tennessee 

V Illinois, Indiana, 
Michigan, Ohio, 
Wisconsin 



VI Iowa, Kansas, Minne- 
sota, Missouri, 
Nebraska, North 
Dakota, South Dakota 

VII Arkansas, Louisiana, 
New Mexico, Oklahoma, 
Texas 

VIII Colorado, Idaho, 
Montana, Utah, 
Wyoming 

IX l/ Arizona, California, 
Nevada, Oregon, 
Washington, Alaska, 
Hawaii, Guam 



Regional Director & Address 

Walter W. Mode 

120 Boylston Street 

Boston, Massachusetts 02116 



Joseph B. O'Connor 
Room 1200, k2 Broadway 
New York, New York 1000U 

Edmund Baxter 

TOO East Jefferson Street 

Charlottesville, Virginia 22901 



Richard H. Lyle 

50 - 7th Street, N. E. 

Room kok 

Atlanta, Georgia 30323 

Melville H. Hosch 
Room 712 

New Post Office Building 
^33 W. Van Buren Street 
Chicago, Illinois 60607 

James W. Doarn 

560 Westport Road 

Kansas City, Missouri 6U111 



James H. Bond 

111^ Commerce Street 

Dallas, Texas 75202 

Albert H. Rosenthal 
621 Seventeenth Street 
Denver, Colorado 80202 

Fay W. Hunter 

Room hkj 

Federal Office Building 

Civic Center 

San Francisco, California 9^102 



1/ Branch regional offices are located in Honolulu, Hawaii, and Anchorage, 
Alaska. 



II -10 



The Department field organization 
included the following units in I96U 



Principal Field Establishments 9U3 



Food and Drug Administration 66 

District offices 18 

Resident inspection stations k& 

Public Health Service 215 

Public Health Service hospitals 15 
Outpatients clinics 25 
Foreign quarantine stations (manned by- 
full-time inspectors) 52 
Public Health Service main field centers 

and laboratories lU 

Indian Health area and sub-area offices 7 

Indian Health field offices h 

Indian and Alaska Native hospitals 50 
Indian and Alaska Native Health 

centers and stations 29 

Indian school health centers 16 

Practical nurse training schools 3 

Social Security Administration 662 

District Offices 613 

Resident Stations U2 

Payment Centers 7 



II -11 



DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE — STATISTICAL SUMMARY 
ORGANIZATION 



Paid Employment 



June 30, 1964 



Unit 

Office of the Secretary 

Special Assistant to the Secretary 
(Health and Medical Affairs) 

Office of Public Information 

Special Assistant to the Secretary 
(Mental Retardation Activities) 
Office of the Under Secretary 

Office of Field Administration 

Office of Internal Security 

Office of Defense Coordinator 
President's Council on Physical Fitness 
President's Council on Aging 
Office of the Assistant Secretary 

(for Legislation) 
Office of the Assistant Secretary 
Office of the General Counsel 
Office of Administration 

Total, Office of the Secretary 
Public Health Service 
Social Security Administration 
Saint Elizabeths Hospital 
Food and Drug Administration 
Office of Education 
Welfare Administration 
Vocational Rehabilitation Administration 

Total Paid Employment 25 

a/ Includes 994 employees at Freedmens Hospital 



D. C. 


Outside 




Area 


D. C. 


Total 


16 


— 


16 


4 





4 


16 


— 


16 


9 


__ 


9 


12 


— 


12 


77 


588 


665 


16 


— 


16 


5 


— 


5 


9 


— 


9 


4 


— 


4 


28 





28 


35 


— 


35 


108 


88 


196 


564 


— 


564 


(903) 


(676) 


(1579) 


15,598a/ 


20,408 


36,006 


605 


34,451 


35,056 


3,967 


— 


3,967 


1,778 


2,150 


3,928 


1,341 


124 


1,465 


704 


325 


1,029 


207 


56 


263 



,103 



58,190 



83,293 



PERSONNEL (as of June 30)1/ 
Full-time Paid Employment 1960 

D. C. Area 2/ .17,339 

Outside D. C. Area 
Total 



42,889 
60,228 



1961 
19,201 
49,739 
68,940 



Part-time and Intermittent Paid Employment 



D. C. Area 2/ 
Outside D. C. Area 

Total 
Total Paid Employment 
D. C. Area 2/ 
Outside D. C. Area 

Total 



464 
949 



401 
994 



1,413 



17,803 
43,838 
61,641 



1,395 



19,602 
50,733 
70,335 



1962 
21,223 

54,348 
75,571 



518 
1,155 
1,673 

21,741 
55,503 
77,244 



1963 
23,190 
56,020 
79,210 



594 
1,258 
1,852 

23,784 
57,278 
81,062 



1964 
24,582 
57,003 
81,585 

522 
1,186 
1,708 

25,103 
58,190 
83,293 



1/ Does not include Howard University and Gallaudet College 

2/ Includes employment of the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 



II 



12 



Department of Health, Education, and Welfare—Statistical Summary 

APPROPRIATIONS AND AUTHORIZATIONS (by fiscal year/ - 
(in thousands of dollars) 

Appropriations 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 

27 2/ 2/ 

Office of the Secretary^' $ 6,541 $ 7,372 § 7,350 § 9,358 $ 16 ,012 $ 21,991 
American Printing House 

for the Blind 400 400 670 739 775 865 

Gallaudet College 1,285 3,600 1,857 2,544 4,641 2,293 

Howard University 4,646 7,166 11,915 13,552 15,064 11,470 

Office of Education 472,981 539,997 602,590 661,865 701,561 1,499,149 

Food and Drug 

Administration 15,512 20,454 26,416 30,951 40,087 50,073 

Public Health Service.... 841,263 1,040,366 1,391,952 1,592,726 1,720,961 1,961, 6M 

Freedmen's Hospital 3,190 3,498 3,736 3,909 3,880 3,873 

Saint Elizabeths Hospital 4,135 10,017 5,750 14,427 8,479 10,601 
Social Security 

Administration 92 

Vocational Rehabilitation 

Administration 66,338 74,519 88,397 102,926 128,415 146,305 

Welfare Administration 3 .'. 2,089,182 2,234,926 2,488,271 2,900,021 3,057,017 2,976,27^ 

Total 3,505,472 3,942,315 4,628,904 5,333,019 5,696,984 6,68U,538 

Authorizations 

Office of the Secretary.. (1,765) (2,172) (2,513) (2,652) (2,704) (2,674) 
Social Security 
Administration (191,876) (232,496) (274,405) (286,398) (317,900) (332,160 ) 

Total (193,641) (234,668) (276,918) (289,050) (320,604) (334,834) 

1/ Appropriations : Include only those funds directly appropriated to the Department by 
the Congress. Not included are funds appropriated to other Federal agencies and 
allocated to DHEW. 

Authorizations: Permit expenditure from OASDI trust funds and special fund accounts 
up to the amount indicated. 

2/ Office of Secretary appropriations include the following amounts for two programs of 
aid to States and communities (in thousands of dollars). 

1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 

Construction of educational 
television (administered 

by Office of Education).... $ $ $ --- $1,500 $6,500 $13,000 

Surplus property utilization 703 786 862 890 950 970 
Salaries and expenses (see 
following sections for 
property values) 
OS appropriation exclusive 

of above 5,838 6,586 6,488 6,968 8,562 8,020 

3/ Figures for 1960-1962 are presented on a comparable basis to reflect reorganization 
of the Social Security Administration and the establishment of the Welfare 
Administration in 1963. 

11-13 



Office of Field Administration 



OFFICE Responsible to the Secretary for participation in the development 
RESPONSI- of and for carrying out of Department policies pertaining to the 
BILITIES organization, integration, coordination and evaluation of field 
(May 1965) activities of the Department; performance of functions of the 
Department relating to State Merit systems; and operation of 
the program of surplus property utilization for health, 
education and civil defense. 



OFFICE 
OBJECTIVES 



SCOPE OF 
ACTIVITIES 



OFFICE 
PROGRAMS 



SOURCE 
OF FUNDS 



To assure the execution of the policies and objectives of the 
Secretary in the field; improve effectiveness of field direction; 
increase uniformity in field methods; develop coordination among 
related programs; effect closer relations between operating 
agencies and regional offices; and keep the Secretary informed of 
progress and trends in field operations. 

The Office plans and develops organization and methods to implement 
Department policies in field program activities and regional office 
operations; conducts studies and makes recommendations to the 
Secretary; supervises and directs activities cutting across program 
lines; and supervises, through the Regional Directors, the general 
administration of the Department's nine regional offices. 

The Office acts as central liaison between the regions and head- 
quarters offices on administrative matters and on problems relating 
to the Regional Directors' coordination and supervision of inter- 
program operations including civil defense and mobilization. 
Through a schedule of regional visits it reviews activities and 
assists in improving methods of operation. 

The Office conducts field audits of most of the grants made by 
the Department including required matching funds. The Grant-in- 
Aid Audit Division is responsible for maintaining a system of 
grant-in-aid audit policies, standards and procedures for the 
Department, and for collaborating with the operating agencies in 
developing fiscal policies and standards applicable to grants. 

The Office aids in administering the merit system provisions of 
the various grant-in-aid laws. The Division of State Merit 
Systems reviews State personnel plans and operations to assure 
compliance with legal requirements. It provides consultation 
and technical services to the State agencies and assistance to 
the Department's operating agencies on merit system matters. It 
performs Similar services on a contractual basis for the Bureau 
of Employment Security, Department of Labor, and the Office of 
Civil Defense, Department of Defense. 

The Office's programs are (l) the administrative and service 
activities described above, and (2) the surplus property utili- 
zation program. A fact sheet on the surplus property utilization 
program follows. 

Annual congressional appropriation. 

II - 1^ 



Office of Field Administration - Statistical Summary 



ACTING DIRECTOR OF OFFICE : Harold B. Siegel 
ORGANIZATION (June 30, I96U) 



(May I965) 



Unit 

Field Administration 
Division of Grant-in-Aid Audits 
Division of State Merit Systems 
Division of Surplus Property Utilization 

Total 



Employees 

327 

188 

53 

_2Z 

665 



PERSONNEL (as of June 30) 


1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 




Paid Employment 


597 


656 


726 


686 


665 




In D. C. area 


66 


74 


77 


77 


77 




Outside D. C. area 


531 


582 


649 


609 


588 




FUNDS (fiscal year) 


1960 


1961 
(Tfc 


1962 


1963 


1964 
ars) 


1965 (est.) 






ousands 


of Doll 




Total avai^ab^e 1/ 


$4,596 


$5,234 $5,967 


$6,301 


$6,495 


$6,507 


Appropriations 


3,438 


3,728 


4,094 


4,308 


4,625 


4,754 


Transfers In 2/ 


1,158 


1,506 


1,856 


1,951 


1,811 


1,753 


Transfers Out 3/ 


mm 


m* 


17 


42 


59 





]/ Includes all funds available for Surplus Property Utilization 
1/ Includes transfers from OASI Trust Fund, BFCU, DoD, DoL, and 0EP 
2/ Transfer to GSA 



11-15 



Surplus Property Utilization Program 

PROGRAM To make available Federal surplus real property to health and educa- 
OBJECTIVES tional institutions, and Federal surplus personal property to health 
and educational institutions and civil defense organizations; in 
addition, to enforce compliance with the terms and conditions of 
donations or transfers to health and educational institutions. 

The needs of health and educational institutions for both real and 
personal property are great and continuous o The utilization of 
surplus will enable schools to offer enriched courses and larger 
programs of study, will make available additional educational 
facilities, will place many more hospital beds in use, and will 
further the carrying out of scientific research. The utilization of 
surplus by civil defense organizations will promote and strengthen 
State civil defense operational readiness. 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



LEGAL 
BASIS 

SOURCE OF 
FUNDS 



Personal property may be acquired by approved or accredited tax- 
supported or nonprofit medical institutions, hospitals, clinics, 
health centers, schools, school systems, colleges or universities j 
tax-supported or nonprofit schools for the mentally retarded and 
the physically handicapped; licensed educational radio or television 
stations; and public libraries. Nonprofit institutions must be exempt 
from taxation under Sec. 501(c)(3) of the 1°5U Internal Revenue Code. 
Personal property may also be acquired by civil defense organizations 
which are so designated pursuant to State law. Real and related 
personal property may be acquired for educational use, or for use in 
the protection of public health, including research, by States and 
their political subdivisions and instrumentalities, by tax-supported 
institutions, and by nonprofit institutions exempt from taxation 
under Sec. 501(c)(3) of the 19Sh Internal Revenue Code. 

Personal property is donated through the services of State Agencies 
for Surplus Property. Such Agencies have been created by State law 
or Executive Order of the Governor in all States of the U. S., the 
District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. The 
Agencies normally assess a nominal handling charge for property 
donated to eligible institutions or organizations. Real property is 
transferred to eligible applicants at a price which takes into con- 
sideration any benefit which has or may accrue to the United States 
because of its proposed use; such public benefit allowances may range 
up to 100$ of fair market value. 

At the time personal property is acquired, the responsible adminis- 
trative official of the donee institution or organization must 
certify that the property is useful and necessary. Real property is 
transferred subject to program use restrictions for a period of years; 
these restrictions may be abrogated by the payment of the unearned 
balance of fair market value. The Government may recapture use of 
the property during a national emergency. 

Section 203, Public Law 152, 8lst Congress, as amended (U0USCU8U) 
and FCDA (now 0CD, DoD) Delegation 5. 

Annual Congressional appropriation. 

II - 16 



.Surplus Property Utilization Program - Statistical Summary 



ACTING CHIEF OF DIVISION: J. 


Lloyd Taylor 






(May 1965) 


ORGANIZATION (June TO, 196k) 












Unit 






Employees 






Surplus Property Utilisation 


Division 




97 






PERSONNEL (as of June 30) 


1960 


1961 


1962. 


1963 


1964 




Paid Employment 


86 


90 


100 


95 


97 




In D, C. area 


16 


16 


18 


19 


20 




Outside D. C. area 


70 


74 


82 


76 


77 




FUNDS (fiscal year) 


1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 


1965 (est.) 








(in thousands] 


1 




Total Available 


$703 


$786 


$862 


$J20 


J9J0 


$970 


Appropriations 


703 


786 


862 


890 


950 


970 


PROGRAM STATISTICS (fiscal 


1959 


1960 


1961 


196^ 


1963 


1964 


year) 














Personal Property Allocated 


363.3 


400.6 


376.2 


380.2 


366.1 


418.1 


(millions of dollars) 














Real Property Transfers 


21.1 


23.3 


30.9 


59.5 


37.9 


35.4 


(millions of dollars) 














Real Property Transfers 


488 


369 


249 


297 


198 


234 


(cases) 














Real Property Revested 


.3 


.1 


.3 


.1 


.8 


.2 


(millions of dollars) 














Cash Collections 


574 


557 


650 1,1 


970 1 


,524 


(thousands of dollars) 















11-17 



American Printing House for the Blind 



RESPONSI- To provide through the Federal Act "To Promote the Education 
BILITIES of the Blind" a permanent source of supply on a non-profit 
basis and to manufacture and distribute on the basis of the 
number of "blind pupils" in the various public educational 
institutions throughout the United States, its territories 
and possessions, and the District of Columbia, specialized 
books, materials and tangible apparatus for the education 
of the blind. 



SCOPE OP In addition to providing educational materials for the 
ACTIVITIES education of the blind through the Federal Act, the 
American Printing House for the Blind, as a private, 
nonprofit institution, makes its facilities and know- 
how available to other agencies wishing to provide 
materials for the blind at cost or less. 

This plan of centralized production has made it possible to 
develop the special skills required and to realize the 
economies of operation which can be assured only through 
centralization, as well as to provide for a permanent 
source of supply of these special materials. 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



The Act of 1879, as modified by the Act of June 25, I906 
(ch. 3536, 3^ Stat. U6o), established in the Treasury a 
perpetual trust fund of $250,000 and provided for a 
permanent annual appropriation of $10,000 as the equivalent 
of h per cent on the principal of the trust fund in lieu 
of further investment of such principal. 

Subsequent legislation in 1919, (ch. 31, Ul Stat. 272), 

authorized in addition to the permanent appropriation, 

an annual appropriation of $1*0,000 for the same purpose. 

This additional annual appropriation was Increased to 

$65,000 in 1927 (Act February 8, 1927, ch. 26, 736 Stat. 1060), 

to $115,000 in 1937 (Act August 23, 1937, ch. 737, 50 

Stat. 7^), to $250,000 on May 22, 1952 (P.L. 35^, 82nd 

Congress) and to $400,000 on August 2, 1956 (P.L. 922, 

86th Congress). On September 22, 1961, the limit of ceiling 

of the annual appropriation was eliminated entirely (P.L. 

29U, 87th Congress). 



II-18 



American Printing House for the Blind — Statistical Summary 



VICE-PRESIDENT AND GENERAL MANAGER: Finis E. Davis 



FUNDS (fiscal year) 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 

U.S. Government grant for the 2/ 2/ 2/ 2/ 

education of the blind I/... 410,000 410,000 680,000" 749.000T 785,000" 875,000" 



Nuabers of eligible blind pupils served through 
the Federal gcant: 



1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 

13,491 14,762 15,973 16,841 17,330 17,730 



1/ Includes permanent appropriation of $10,000 each year. 

~2I Includes funds for expenses related to advisory committees. 



11-19 



GALIATJDET COLLEGE 

CENTENNIAL In 196^ Gallaudet celebrated its Centennial, marking the one 
YEAR hundred years since President Abraham Lincoln signed the 

college's charter. President Lyndon B. Johnson, Gallaudet' s 
official Patron and featured speaker, presented the college 
with his own annual citation for distinguished service in 
promoting the employment of the handicapped. Medals were 
struck to commemorate the Centennial, silver copies of which 
were awarded to the President and notable friends of the 
college at a Centennial Banquet. The speaker at the one 
hundredth Commencement Exercises was Senator Edward B. 
Kennedy. A Centennial Reunion of the Alumni the last week 
in June brought 1100 graduates, former students, and their 
families back to the campus for a week of stimulating 
activity. A symbolic gift of $135>000 was made to the 
college, partial fruit of the alumni's Centennial Fund 
campaign. 

PROGRAM To provide a liberal higher education for deaf persons who need 
OBJECTIVES special facilities in order to compensate for their loss of 
hearing; to conduct research into deafness, and to educate 
teachers who will serve in schools for deaf children. 

EXTENT OF Gallaudet is the world's only college for the deaf. It is 
PROBLEM currently affected by the national increase in college enroll- 
ments, and is preparing to expand from its present enrollment 
during the next decade. Furthermore, it is expanding its 
teacher education in order to help meet the growing shortage of 
teachers in secondary and elementary, schools for the deaf, where 
enrollments similarly are rising. 

PRESENT As a college of liberal arts and sciences, Gallaudet is 
PROGRAM accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and 
SCOPE Secondary Schools. In addition to the four-year undergraduate 
course of studies, Gallaudet offers a one-year college pre- 
paratory course for students who have not been able to obtain a 
full, senior high school education. Deaf children of nursery 
age are taught in the Hearing and Speech Center. Elementary and 
secondary education for deaf children of the District of 
Columbia and adjacent states is provided by the Kendall School, 
a laboratory school for the college's Graduate Department of 
Education. This Department, established in I89I, admits both 
deaf and normally-hearing graduate students. Studies in the 
Department may be pursued during summer sessions. The college 
also offers, during summer session, graduate work in audiology 
and in mathematics for teachers. The Ilearing and Speech Center, 
opened in 1959* provides students and selected outpatients with 
testing and therapy for auditory, neurological, and related 
difficulties. It is also the focus for research on these 
problems . 



II - 20 



A Counseling Center for the deaf has been established on the 
campus. It provides personal, vocational, and educational 
counseling services for the student population and other deaf 
persons upon referral. Research into deafness is performed by 
these principal offices: Psychological Research, Institutional 
Research, and Linguistics Research. As educational facilities 
expand to meet a rising enrollment, auxiliary services and 
facilities are likewise growing. 

LEGAL Public Law 420 - 83rd Congress, Chapter 324 — 2nd Session 
BASIS Gallaudet College, D.C. 11 Stat. 161, D.C. Code 31, Ch. 10. 

SOURCE Approximately 657<> of operating funds is supplied by Congres- 
OF sional appropriation, the balance coming from charges for 
FUNDS tuition and maintenance. Construction funds for expansion of 
facilities are all from Congressional appropriation. 

GOVERNING A Board of Directors of thirteen members , ten private and three 
BODY from the Congress of the United States. 



II - 21 



PERSONNEL (as of June 30) 

(Non-Federal) igg9 196Q 19fil 1962 1963 19M 

Paid employment 
in the D.C. 
area and in D.C. 178 196 209 255 244 236 



FUNDS (Fiscal year) 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 

Total available: $1,313 $1,702 $4,086 $2,451 $3,276 $5,442 $3,237 
(in thousands) 

Appropriations : 

Operations 849 904 1,074 1,256 1,479 1,722 1,926 

Construction 123 325 2,512 601 1,065 2,919 367 

Private: 

Operations 341 473 500 594 732 801 944 

Totals: 

Operations 1,190 1,377 1,574 1,850 2,211 2,523 2,870 

Construction 123 325 2,512 601 1,065 2,919 367 



PROGRAM STATISTICS 

Enrollment: 
Gallaudet 
Kendall School 
Nursery 


1959 

358 

75 


1960 

*453 
88 


1961 

*455 
93 


1962 

*592 

87 

9 


1963 

*673 

107 

28 


1964 

*762 

107 

42 


1965 

*897 

132 

46 


Totals: 


433 


541 


548 


688 


808 


911 


1,075 



♦including graduate students and summer students 



II - 22 



Howard University Program 



PROGRAM 
OBJECTIVES 



EXTENT OF 
PROBLEM 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



SOURCE OP 
FUNDS 



GOVERNING 
BODY 

ACCREDITATION 



To provide every element of educational opportunity afforded 
by the undergraduate, graduate and professional divisions of 
a fully developed university, to students of both sexes, 
from every race, creed, color and national origin, but to ac- 
cept and to discharge a special responsibility for the ad- 
mission and training of Negro students. 

Since its establishment in 1867 until the present time 
Howard University has been the only university of public 
support in the southern states which freely and substanti- 
ally admitted the Negro youth to any approximation of the 
wide scope of undergraduate, graduate and professional op- 
portunities characteristic of the American state university. 
During the 97 years of its existence it has graduated a 
larger body of Negro physicians, dentists, pharmacists, en- 
gineers, architects, musicians, lawyers and social workers 
than all other universities of public support combined. In 
196^' it still served a larger body of such students than 
the entire group of public institutions in these states. 

The University operates an undergraduate college, a graduate 
school offering the master's degree in twenty-six depart- 
ments and the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in eight de- 
partments, and eight professional schools as follows: medi- 
cine, dentistry, pharmacy, engineering and architecture, 
fine arts, social work, law and religion. (Religion re- 
ceives no support from Federal funds. ) The university also 
conducts a summer school. In 1963 the university served 
8,715 students from 4-8 states, the District of Columbia, two 
United States possessions, 38 countries in Africa, Asia, 
Europe, Central and South America, and 13 island countries 
in the West Indies. 

The university was chartered by act of Congress on March 2, 
1867. Authorization for annual appropriations to Howard 
University was provided in the act of Congress approved 
December 13, 1928 (4-5 Statutes 1021, Section 2.) 

The university receives support from Federal funds, as well 
as from student tuition and fees, gifts, grants and endow- 
ments. 

The government of Howard University is vested in a self- 
perpetuating Board of Trustees of twenty- four members. 

All educational divisions are fully accredited. The univer- 
sity was re-accredited as a whole by the Middle States Asso- 
ciation of Colleges and Secondary Schools in April 1957- 



II - 23 



HOWARD UNIVERSITY Program - Statistical Summary 



DIRECTOR OP PROGRAM: 



James M. Nabrit, Jr., President 



ORGANIZATIONAL UNITS AMD EMPLOYEES - Non- Federal 

Units 

General Administration 

Resident Instruction and Departmental Research 
Organized Research 
General Library- 
Operation and Maintenance of Physical Plant 
Auxiliary Enterprises and Non-Educational Expenses 



Average Employment 
1964 

155 
960 
138 
61 
271 
181 









1,766 


PERSONNEL (As of 6/30) i960 

Paid Employment - 

D. C. Area 1,665 


1961 
1,844 


1962 
2,197 


1963 1964 
(Actual) (Actual) 
2,283 2,336 



AVAILABLE FUNDS 














(fiscal year) 


I960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 


1965 






(in thousands) 


(Actual) 


(Est. ) 


(Est. ) 


Operational Funds 














Appropriations 


4,617 


5,490 


7,007 


7,935 


8,819 


9,660 


Tuition, grants, 














reimbursements , etc . 


4,4-70 


5,093 


5.765 


6.977 


7,257 


7,350 


Total 


9,087 


10,583 


12,772 


14,912 


16,076 


17,010 


Construction 














Appropriations 


21 


1,658 


4,908 


5,617 


6,245 


1,810 


PROGRAM STATISTICS 


i960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 


1965 


Gross Enrollment by Educational Units 


3,552 


4,662 


4,898 




Liberal Arts 


3,122 


3,472 


5,062 


Graduate School 


726 


723 


30* 


602 


' ■■ fc 




Engineering & Arch. 


898 


826 


778 


772 


115 


775 


Music 


309 


316 


375 


463 


537 


537 


Dentistry 


644 


722 


726 


691 


632 


632 


Medicine 


355 


368 


377 


391 


385 


385 


Law 


106 


105 


128 


128 


137 


137 


Pharmacy 


161 


179 


177 


173 


165 


165 


Religion 


57 


64 


74 


74 


63 


63 


Social Work 


129 


135 


126 


158 


177 


177 


Peace Corps 


MM 


■■■■ 


— 


95 
8,299 


30 

8,715 


— 




6,507 


6,910 


7,118 


8,899 



Affiliated Institution: Freedmen's Hospital, Washington, D. C. In this 
institution the medical staff of Howard University in 1964 served 
15,925 in-patients and 102,488 out-patients, including emergency service. 



II - 24 



PROGRAMS 

OF THE 

U. S. DEPARTMENT OP HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE 

PART II 

Office of Education 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

Commissioner's Statement 11-27 

Office of Education 11-28 

Digest of Legislation Governing Operations 

of the Office of Education 11-31 

Program Direction and Services 11-^2 

Bureau of Educational Assistance Programs II-U4 

College and University Assistance Il-k'J 

Educational Television Facilities Program 11-50 

School Assistance In Federally Affected Areas 11-52 

State Grants (Titles III, V-A, NDEA) 11-55 

Vocational and Technical Education and 

Manpower Training II-58 

Bureau of Educational Research and Development II-63 

Educational Improvement for Handicapped Children 

and Youth ■ 11-66 

Educational Organization and Administration II-69 

Educational Research 11-73 

Educational Statistics 11-75 

Library Services 11-77 

Bureau of Higher Education Facilities 11-79 

Bureau of International Education II-81 

National Defense Education Act - Program Summary II-85 



II - 25 



Francis Keppel, U. S. Commissioner of Education 
OFFICE OF EDUCATION 



After almost a century of service, the United States Office of Education has 
been given by the Eighty-eighth Congress the heaviest responsibility and 
broadest panorama of programs in history to advance and strengthen 
American education. This increased responsibility comes at the beginning 
of an era of unprecedented domestic and international challenge, a time 
when the Nation looks to education as a principal means for assuring the 
long-term growth and stature of our democratic society. 

From an agency of four persons created in 1867 to collect and disseminate 
information on the state of American education, the Office today has become 
an organization of more than 1, 600 persons charged with informing, assist- 
ing and stimulating State, regional and local educational institutions. The 
programs the Office administers are now budgeted by the Congress at an 
annual appropriation of about $1.4 billion. 

In advancing the strength and vitality of local and institutional control of 
education in the United States, the Office of Education today administers 
new legislative programs for expanding the facilities of higher education, 
for broadening adult education, for raising the qualifications of teachers, 
for strengthening vocational and technical schools, for improving public 
community library services, for extending school guidance and counseling, 
and for promoting research into sound methods of improving education 
generally. 

The prime responsibility of the Office today is to help achieve in fact the 
Nation's century-old objective of universal education -- the availability of 
the highest quality and highest level of education to all Americans who can 
benefit from it. 



II - 27 



Office of Education 

OFFICE The Office of Education is the only Federal agency which has 
RESPONSI- education per se as its concern. It identifies needs, 
BILITIES evaluates resources, and provides professional and financial 

assistance to strengthen areas of education where the national 
interest is critically affected. It collaborates with other 
Federal agencies In reviewing and assessing the impact of 
Federal programs on education. It proposes appropriate 
Federal policies for education. 

SCOPE OF The -Office is engaged primarily in (a) administering grants 
ACTIVITIES "to the States; (b) administering grants to institutions of 

higher education; (c) contracting with colleges, universities, 
State and private agencies for studies and research on 
educational problems; (d) making studies and collecting and 
disseminating information and statistics dealing with 
education; (e) providing consultative and advisory services 
to cultural agencies, educational agencies and institutions, 
and other Federal agencies; (f ) operating programs under 
agreement with other Federal agencies. 

The financial assistance programs and the studies and research, 
intramural as well as extramural, have these ultimate objec- 
tives: the correction of imbalances in the curriculum; improved 
course content and teacher competence; to identify and educate 
more of the talented students of the Nation; to encourage the 
expansion of educational opportunities for special groups, such 
as the mentally retarded, the handicapped, and the economically 
deprived; training for the skilled, supervisory, professional, 
and scientific workers required in the economy and in the U. S. 
programs abroad. 

The Office serves as the center of educational information and 
communication, advises on educational policies and programs 
and on manpower supply, including the relationship between 
manpower demands in foreign and domestic programs that look to 
education as a source of supply. It also works with other 
Federal agencies and with international organizations in the 
study and improvement of education. 



ORGANIZA- 
TION OF THE 
OFFICE 



Programs of the Office are directed by the Commissioner of 
Education through the: Bureau of Educational Research and 
Development, Bureau of International Education, Bureau of 
Educational Assistance Programs, and Bureau of Higher 
Education Facilities established during FY 1965 to 
administer the Higher Education Facilities Act of 1963. 



II - 28 



Office of Education - Statistical Summary 



ORGANIZATION (June 30, 196k) 











Employees 






Unit 






Regular Transferred Funds 




Program Direction and Services 




204 




24 




Bureau of Educational Research and 




533 




4 




Development 














Bureau of International Education 




43 


in 




Bureau of Educational Assistance Programs 


448 




98 








Total 


1,228 


237 




PERSONNEL (as of June 30) 


I960 


1961 


1962 


15*3 


1964 




Paid Employment 


1,260 


1,246 


1,310 


1,389 


1,465 




Regular 


1,127 


1,114 


1,157 


1,173 


l,22o 




Transferred and Reim- 














bursed funds 


133 


132 


153 


216 


237 




In D.C. Area 














Regular 


1,027 


1,010 


1,058 


1,080 


1,134 




Transferred funds 


133 


132 


153 


194 


207 




Outside D.C. Area 














Regular 


100 


104 


99 


93 


94 




Transferred funds 








22 


30 




FUNDS (fiscal year) 


I960 


^L 


1962 


1963 


1964 


1965 






. thousands) 


est. 


est. 


Total available 
Appropriations : 


$1*79,353 $544,848 ; 


$616, 141 


$718,976 $810,958 i 


1.535.845 


Grants and Loans 














Appropriations 
Obligations 
Direct Operations 


461,1*51 


524,791 


585,921 


641,835 


674,615 


1,461,110 


9,550 


10,367 


11,462 


12,102 


13 , 627 


20,291 


Cooperative Research 














Appropriations 


3,200 


3,357 


5,000 


6,985 


11,500 


15,840 


Obligations 






4,644 


6,985 


11,498 


15,840 


Contracts: Captioned 














Films for the Deaf 


50 


150 


207 


525 


1,132 


1,384 


Special Foreign Currency 












Appropriations 


... 


31 




400 


500 


500 


Obligations 


— 


24 


««■«• 


34 


389 





Transfer to 0E: 














Grants 


3,427 


3,851 


11,213 


51,709 


103,320 


30,758* 


Direct Operations 


742 


1,101 


1,441 


2,123 


2,750 


2,143* 


Contracts 


933 


1,200 


897 


3,297 


3,514 


3,819 



* Manpower Development and Training Activities amount not available 



II - 29 



Digest of Legislation Governing Operations 
of the Office of Education 

Office of Education , General 

1. 1867. Establishes a Department of Education for the purpose 
of collecting statistics and facts showing the condition and 
progress of education, and to diffuse such information as 
shall aid the people of the United States in establishing and 
maintaining efficient school systems, and otherwise promote 
the cause of education. (39th Cong.) 14 Stat. 434; 20 
U.S.C. 1, et seq. 

2. 1868. Provided that the Department of Education should cease 

on June 30, 1869, and an Office of Education should be established 
and attached to the Department of the Interior. (40th Cong.) 
15 Stat. 92; 20 U.S.C. 1. 

3. 1896. Authorizes the expansion of the Office functions to 
prepare and publish a bulletin on the condition of education 
and to report on educational activities in foreign countries of 
interest to the United States. 29 Stat. 171; 20 U.S.C. 3. 

4. 1928. Howard University. Directs the Office of Education to 
inspect Howard University at least once a year. (P.L, 70-634) 
45 Stat. 1021; 20 U.S.C. 121-123. 

5. 1939. President's Reorganization Plan No. 1. Transferred the 
Office of Education with all its functions, including the 
administration of Federal-State programs of vocational education, 
from the Department of the Interior to the Federal Security 
Agency . (Public Res. 20, 76th Cong.) 53 Stat. 1424; 20 U.S.C. 

1, note. 

6. 1953. President's Reorganization Plan No. 1. Created the 
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (replaced the 
Federal Security Agency) and the Office of Education became one 
of the principal operating agencies of that Department. 

(P.L. 83-13) 67 Stat. 631; 20 U.S.C. 1, note. 

7. 1964. Coordinates Federal Education Programs; and establishes 
Federal Interagency Committee on Education. Directs the 
Secretary of the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, 
with the assistance of the Commissioner of Education, to identify 
the educational needs and goals of the Nation and make 
recommendation to the President; establishes Federal Interagency 
Committee on Education, with Commissioner as chairman, to 
facilitate coordination of Federal education programs. 
Executive Order No. 11185, 88th Cong. 29 F.R. 14399. 



II - 31 



II. Programs Providing Financial Assistance ( See also Civil Defense ) 

1 . Economic Opportunity 

1964. Title I-C of the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964 
provides grants to institutions of higher education to 
stimulate and promote part-time employment of students who 
are from low-income families and need financial assistance. 

Title II-B provides grants to States to initiate 
programs for individuals 18 or older whose inability to read 
and write constitutes a substantial impairment of their 
ability to get or retain employment commensurate with their 
real ability. (P.L. 88-452) 78 Stat. 515; 42 U.S.G. 2751. 

2. Handicapped, Education of 

1958. Provides in the Department of Health, Education and 
Welfare for a loan service of captioned films for the deaf; 
functions delegated to Commit si oner of Education. Public 
Law 87-715 amends objectives, providing for the. conduct of 
research and training of persons in the use of films for the 
deaf, and for the production and distribution of educational 
and training films. (P.L. 85-905) 72 Stat. 1742, (P.L. 87-715) 
76 Stat. 654; 42 U.S.G. 2491. 

1958. Authorizes grants to institutions of higher learning 
and to State educational agencies to encourage expansion of 
teaching in the education of the mentally retarded. 
(P.L. 85-926) 72 Stat. 1777; 20 "U.S.G. 611. These provisions 
are amended by the Mental Retardation Facilities and Community 
Mental Health Centers Construction Act of 1963. (P.L. 88-164, 
T III) 77 Stat. 293; 20 U.S*.C. 618. 

1963. Title III of the Mental Retardation Facilities and 
Community Mental Health Centers Construction Act of 1963 amends . 
P.L. 85-926 to bring within the purview of that Act teachers, 
trainers or supervisors of teachers, and other specialized 
personnel engaged in the education of hard of hearing, deaf, 
speech impaired, visually handicapped, seriously emotionally 
disturbed, crippled, and other health-impaired children and 
trainers or supervisors of teachers of mentally retarded 
children. Funds are also authorized for research and demonstration 
projects. (P.L. 88-164) 77 Stat. 293; 20 U.S.G. 618. 



II - 32 



Higher Education faciliti es 

1963. The Higher Education Facilities Act of 1263 provides 
assistance to graduate and undergraduate institutions, junior 
and community colleges, and technical institutes in constructing 
certain academic facilities needed for increased enrollments. 

Grants are authorized, to be distributed among tiie :,tates by 
formula, for the construction of academic facilites for public 
community colleges and public technical institutes and other 
institutions of higher education, grants are also authorized 
for the construction of academic facilities for graduate 
schools and cooperative graduate centers. In addition, loans 
are authorized for the construction of academic facilities. 
(r.L. 88-204) 77 Stat. 363; 20 U.S.C. 710. 

International Education (in addition to general authority 
under 14 Stat. 434 and 29 Stat. 171; 20 U.S.C. 3.) 

1961. The Act for International Development reorganizes the 
programs of military aid, economic aid, and technical assistance 
given to foreign countries pursuant to which there was established 
in the Department of State the Agency for International Development, 
(P.L. 87-195) 75 Stat. 424; 22 U.S.C. 2151. 

The Mutual Educational and Cultural Exchange Act of 1961 brings 
together within a single Act the various authorizations for 
educational and cultural exchange, and vests authority for 
provisions in the President. It consolidates and expands 
provisions of the Fulbright Act, Smith-Mundt Act, Finnish Debt 
Payments Act, Mutual Security Act of 1954, Agricultural Trade 
Development and Assistance Act of 1954, International Cultural 
Exchange and Trade Fair Participation Act of 1956. (P.L. 87-256) 
75 Stat. 527; 22 U.S.C. 2451. 

Public Law 87-256 continues the Board of Foreign Scholarships, 
including representatives of the Office of Education; the two-way 
exchange of persons between the United States and foreign 
countries and the expenditure of U.S. held foreign currencies in 
financing travel and expenses; the interchange of persons, 
knowledge and skills, the rendering of technical and other 
services, and the interchange of developments in the field of 
education, the arts, and science; the authorization to use war 
debt payments made by the Republic of Finland to finance 
reciprocal educational opportunities between Finland and the 
United States; and the authorization for sale of surplus 
agricultural commodities for foreign currencies which may be 
used for international educational exchange activities, for 



II - 33 



financing programs for the interchange of persons, for the 
use of foreign currencies in such amounts as may be specified 
in appropriation acts, to collect, collate, translate, 
abstract, and disseminate scientific and technological 
information and to conduct research and support scientific 
activities overseas for educational purposes. 

The Office acts as agent for the Bureau of Educational and 
Cultural Affairs of the Department of State in the recruitment 
of American teachers for the teacher exchange program, and 
for one-way assignments overseas; in the training program for 
vi siting teachers from other countries; and in related activities. 

The Office also acts as agent for the Agency for International 
Development, Department of State, in the recruitment of American 
educators for overseas education missions, for providing 
professional services on request to education missions, and for 
the training of foreign educators in the United States under the 
technical assistance program. 

By Executive Order 11034 the President delegated to the Secretary 
of Health, Education, and Uelfare, the administration of the 
program for teachers and prospective teachers in modern language 
and area studies under Sec. 102(b)(6). Administration has 
been redelegated by the Secretary to the Commissioner. 

1962. Migration and Refugee Assistance Act amends Mutual 
Security Act of 1954, by including "assistance to State and 
local public agencies providing educational and special training." 
Under this law the Office of Education operates the education 
part of the Cuban Refugee Program which provides assistance to 
school districts impacted with Cubans; grants for vocational 
training and English instruction; loans to college and university 
students; and retraining of professionals. (P.L. 87-510) 76 Stat. 
121; 22 U.S.C. 2601. 

5 . L and-Grant Colleges and Universities 

1862. The first Morrill Act donated public land to the States to 
promote the establishment of colleges of agriculture and mechanic 
arts, generally referred to as land-grant colleges. 12 Stat. 503, 
as amended by 14 Stat. 208, 17 Stat. 559, 22 Stat. 484, 44 Stat. 
247, 46 Stat. 1028; 7 U.S.C. 301. 

1890. The Second Morrill Act provides permanent annual grants 
of Federal funds for endowment and support of land-grant colleges 
and requires an annual report to the Congress of the disbursement 
of funds. 26 Stat. 417, 1424, 67 Stat. 631; 7 U.S.C. 321-329. 



II - 3^ 



1307. Nelson Amendment increases Federal aid to land-grant 
colleges. (P.L. 59-242) 34 Stat. 1281, as amended by 45 Stat. 
991, 53 Stat. 

1935. Bankhead- Jones Act, Title II, as amended, authorizes 
additional appropriations of Federal funds to land-grant colleges. 
(P.L. 74-182) 49 Stat. 439, (P.L. 82-390) 66 Stat. 135, and 

(P.L. 86-653) 74 Stat. 525; 7 U.S.C. 329. 

I960. Authorizes $6 million in lieu of land to Hawaii. 
(P.L. 86-624) 74 Stat. 411. 

6 „ Library Services and Library Construction 

1892. Provides that library collections of various government 
agencies, including the Office of Education, shall be accessible ... 
to students of any institution of higher education incorporated 
under the laws of Congress or the District of Columbia. (Joint 
Resolution No. 3, 52d Cong.) 27 Stat. 395. In 1901 Congress 
broadened this to include ''duly qualified individuals, students, 
and graduates of institutions of learning in the several States 
and Territories, as well as in the District of Columbia." 
31 Stat. 1039. 

1936. The Appropriation Act for the Office of "Education for 
fiscal year 1937, and subsequent legislation provide for the 
establishment and functioning of library services within the 
Office of Education to make surveys, studies, investigations, 
and reports on public school, college, and university libraries, 
foster the coordination of public school library service; 
coordinate library service on the national level with other forms 
of adult education and foster the development of library service 
throughout the country. 49 Stat. 1797. 

1956. The Library Services and Construction Act of 1964 amends 
and extends the Library Services Act of 1956 as amended. They 
authorize payments to States for construction and further extension 
of public libraries and public library services to areas without 
such services, or with inadequate services. (P.L. 84-597) 
70 Stat. 293, amended (P.L. 86-679) 74 Stat. 571, (P.L. 87-688) 
76 Stat. 586, (P.L. 88-269) 78 Stat. 11; 20 U.S.C. 351. 

7 . Loans, Student War 

1942. Authorizes the Office to collect payments on loans provided 
to students in specified professional educational fields in fiscal 
years 1943 and 1944. (P.L. 77-647) 56 Stat. 576. 



II - 35 



8. Manpower Development and Training Act 

1962. Authorizes the Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare 
to enter into agreements with States under which State vocational 
education agencies will assist in providing basic education and 
training programs for unemployed or underemployed youth and adults 
(P.L. 87-415) 76 Stat. 24, as amended (P.L. 87-729) 76 Stat. 679, 
(P.L. 88-214) 77 Stat. 422; 42 U.S.C. 2571. 

9. National Defense Education Act (iSDEA)* 

1958. Authorizes the following Federal programs to encourage 
and assist in the expansion and improvement of certain aspects 
of education to meet critical national needs: (1) Federal 
participation in college and university student loan funds; 
(2) grants to States and loans to nonprofit schools for purchase 
of equipment or materials and improvement of State supervision 
to strengthen elementary and secondary school instruction in 
science, mathematics, modern foreign languages, English, reading 
history, geography and civics; (3) fellowships for graduate study; 
(4) grants to States to strengthen guidance, counseling, and 
testing in elementary grades through junior college and 
contractual arrangements with institutions of higher learning to 
establish institutes for guidance and counseling personnel for 
those same grades; (5) language and area study centers and 
fellowships for the study of modern languages, and for the conduct 
of research; (6) research and experimentation in more effective 
use of modern communications media for educational purposes; 
(7) grants to States for development of area vocational education 
programs in scientific or technical fields. (See II, 16 - 
Vocational and Technical Education); (8) grants to States to 
improve statistical services of State educational agencies; 
and (9) institutes for teachers or supervisors of modern foreign 
languages, reading, history, geography, English, disadvantaged 
youth, school library personnel and educational media specialists. 
(P.L. 85-864) 72 Stat. 1580, as amended (P.L. 86-70) 72 Stat. 1582, 
(P.L. 86-624) 74 Stat. 413, (P.L. 87-344) 75 Stat. 759, (P.L. 87-400) 
75 Stat. 832, (P.L. 87-835) 76 Stat. 1070, (P.L. 88-210) 77 Stat. 
415, (P.L. 88-665) 78 Stat. 1100; 20 U.S.C. 401. 

10. Nondiscrimination in Public Education 

1964. Title IV of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 directs the 
Commissioner of Education and the Attorney General to perform 
certain actions intended to result in the desegregation of public 
education. The Commissioner (1) is instructed to conduct a 
survey and make a report on the extent 6f segregation in public 
education at all levels; (2) is authorized to give technical 
assistance in planning and carrying out plans for desegregating 
public schools; (3) is authorized to arrange for special 
institutes to train elementary and secondary personnel in 
effective ways of coping with problems occasioned by desegregation 
and to pay a stipend to individuals who attend such institutes 

* Because of the number of programs authorized by the HDEJA,-tne HDEA 

Program Summary (at the end of the chapter) provides recent information-- 
including the 1961+ amendments --which cannot be adequately described under 
individual programs. 

11-36 



on a full-time basis; and (4) is authorized to pay the cost of 
(a) inservice training for teachers and other school personnel in 
dealing with problems incident to school desegregation and (b) 
employing specialists to advise in problems incident to desegre- 
gation. 

In addition, all* Federal agencies which administer programs of 
financial assistance are authorized and directed, in Title VI, 
to issue regulations approved by the President designed to prevent 
discrimination against any person in such programs on grounds of 
race, color, or national origin. A program of financial assistance 
to a given recipient may be terminated because of failure to comply 
with such regulations. (P.L. 88-352) 78 Stat. 246-249; 42 U.S.C. 
2000(c) - (c-9). 

11* Redevelopment Areas, Training and Retraining 

1961. Area Redevelopment Act authorizes the Secretary of 
Health, Education, and Welfare to provide assistance for vocational 
training and retraining through contracts with State vocational 
education agencies or with public or private educational institutions. 
(P.L. 87-27) 75 Stat. 47; 42 U.S.C. 250i. 

12. Research 

1954. Authorizes cooperative research in education and permits 
the Commissioner to enter into contracts or jointly financed • 
cooperative agreements with universities and colleges and State 
educational agencies for the conduct of research, surveys, and 
demonstrations in education. (P.L. 83-531) 68 Stat. 533; 20 U.S.C. 331. 

1954. Executive Order 10521 provides that the National Science 
Foundation, in consultation with the Commissioner, shall study effects 
on educational institutions of Federal contracts and grants for scientific 
research. (19 F.R. 1499). 

See also Vocational and Technical Education, Handicapped, and National 
Defense Education Act. 

13. School Assistance in Federally Affected Areas 

1950. Authorizes funds for assistance in the operation of schools 
to districts in areas affected by Federal activities. (P.L. 81-874 
as amended and extended) 64 Stat. 1100; 20 U.S.C. 236-244. 

Authorizes funds for construction of schools in areas affected by 
Federal activities. (P.L. 81-815 as amended and extended) 
64 Stat. 967; 20 U.S.C. 631-645. 



II - 37 



14. Science Clubs 

1958 Authorizes the Commissioner to encourage, foster, and 
assist in establishment of clubs for boys and girls especially 
interested in science. (P.L. 85-875) 72 Stat. 1700; 20 tT.S.C. 
2 note. 

15. Television, Educational 

1962. Authorizes a 5-year program of grants on matching basis 

to State and local agencies to help increase and improve educational 

television transmission facilities. Office of Education has 

administrative responsibility by delegation of the Secretary of 

Health, Education, and Welfare. (P.L. 87-447) 76 Stat. 64; 

47 U.S.C. 390,399. 

16. Vocational and Technical Education 

1917. Smith-Hughes Act establishes a program of permanent Federal 
aid to States for vocational education below the college level; 
provides for cooperation with the States in the promotion of such 
education in agriculture and industry and home economics; appropriates 
money and regulates its expenditures for salaries and training of 
teachers, supervisors, or directors of agricultural subjects, and 
salaries and training of teachers of trade, industrial, and home 
economics subjects in schools and classes of less than college 
grade. (P.L. 64-347 as amended) 39 Stat. 929; 20 U.S.C. 11-15, 
16-28. 

1946. George-Barden Act (Vocational Education Act of 1946) 
supplements Smith-Hughes Act; authorizes appropriation for further 
development of vocational education of less than college grade; 
provides funds for vocational education in distributive occupations 
and additional funds for vocational education in agriculture, home 
economics, trades and industry. Also provides that funds may be 
used for administration, supervision, teacher training, vocational 
guidance, and for equipment and supplies for vocational insti _ uction. 
(P.L. 79-586 as amended) 60 Stat. 775; 20 U.S.C. 15 i-159 

1950. Federal Charter for Future Farmers of America authorizes 
the Office of Education to provide facilities and personnel to 
assist in the administration of FFA activities. (P.L. 81-740) 
64 Stat. 567; 36 U.S.C. 288. 



II - 38 



1956. Amends George- Bar den Act and authorizes annual grant 
for 5 years, not to exceed $5 million each year, for the States 
to extend and improve practical nurse training. (P.L. 84-911 
as amended) 70 Stat. 925s 20 U.S.C. 15 aa-15 jj. Practical 
nurse training program was made permanent by Section 11 of 
P.L. 88-210, 77 Stat. 411. 

1956. Amends George-Barden Act and authorizes an annual 
appropriation not to exceed $375,000, beginning with fiscal 
year 1957, for vocational education in the fishery trades and 
industry and distributive occupations therein. (P.L. 84-1027 
as amended) 70 Stat. 1126, 78 Stat. 197; 20 U.S.C. 15j(a)(5). 

1958. Amends George-Barden Act and authorizes annual grant 
for 4 years, of $15 million for area vocational education programs 
and administrative funds. (P.L. 85-864 as amended) 72 Stat. 
1598; 20 U.S.C. 15 aaa-15 ggg. The program was made permanent 
by Section 11 of P.L. 88-210, 77 Stat. 411. 

1963. The Vocational Education Act of 1963 amends and improves 
the Vocational Education Act of 1946 and supplementary vocational 
education Acts; authorizes new programs of vocational education; 
provides part-time employment for youth who need the earnings 
from such employment to continue their vocational training on a 
full-time basis. Funds allotted to the States may be used for 
the vocational education of persons attending high school; 
persons who have completed or left high school and are available 
for -full- time study in preparation for entering the labor market; 
persons who have entered the labor market and need training or 
retraining to achieve stability or advancement in employment; 
and persons who have academic, socioeconomic, or other handicaps 
that prevent them from succeeding in the regular vocational 
education program; for construction and initial equipment of area 
vocational education school facilities; and for ancillary services. 
A separate allotment to the States may be used for work- study 
programs. In addition the Commissioner may make direct grants 
to State boards, colleges and universities, and other public or 
nonprofit agencies, institutions, or organizations for research 
training, and experimental, pilot, and demonstration programs or 
for residential schools. The work-study program and demonstration 
residential schools have authorization for four years only. The 
ether programs have permanent authorization. (P.L. 88-210) 77 Stat. 
403; 20 U.S.C. 35-35n. 



II - 39 



III. Services or Programs Involving Other Agencies 

1. Aliens under Student Visas, Schools for 

1952. Immigration and Nationality Act directs the Attorney 
General to consult with the Office of Education on the approval 
of schools for nonimmigrant aliens studying here under student 
visas. (P.L. 82-414 as amended) 66 Stat. 166, (P.L. 87-256) 
75 Stat. 527; 8 U.S.G. 1101. 

2. Civil Defense, Federal 

1950. Federal Civil Defense Act, as amended, authorizes the utiliza- 
tion of the services of Federal agencies. Executive Order No. 11001 
assigns to the Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare preparation 
of national emergency plans and development of preparedness programs 
concerning educational functions and institutions. (P.L. 81-920, as 
amended) 64 Stat. 1245-1257, (P.L. 88-335) 78 Stat. 231; 50 U.S.C. 
App . 2251 et seq. 

3. Loans, College Housing 

1950. Housing Act of 1950 as amended and extended provides 
that the Administrator of the Housing and Home Finance Agency 
may consult with and secure the advice and recommendations of 
the Office of Education with respect to applications for college 
housing loans. (P.L. 81-475) 64 Stat. 48, (Reorganization Plan 
No. 1) 18 F.R. 22053, 67 Stat. 631; 12 U.S.C. 1701. 

4. Veterans Education 

1952. Veterans Readjustment Assistance Act of 1952, as 
amended, (GI Bill), requires the Administrator of Veterans 
Affairs to use the services of the Office of Education in 
developing cooperative agreements with State and local 
agencies relating to the approval of courses of education and 
training; in reviewing the plan of operations of State approving 
agencies; in assisting State and local agencies in developing 
and improving policies, standards, and regulations in connection 
with their duties; requires the Commissioner to publish a 
list of nationally recognized accrediting agencies and 
associations. Makes the Commissioner an ex-officio member 
of the Vocational Rehabilitation and Advisory Committee to 
the Administrator of Veterans Affairs. The programs of 
veterans who study overseas must be at an approved educational 
institution of higher learning. At the request of the 
Administrator of Veterans Affairs, the Office reviews programs 
of study. (P.L. 82-550, as amended) 66 Stat. 663, (P.L. 85-857) 
72 Stat, 1174, 1193, (P.L. 88-126) 77 Stat. 158, (P.L. 88-361) 
78 Stat. 297; 38 U.S.C. 1601, 1653, 1662. 



II - 4o 



IV . Committees and Boards ( See also Veterans Education and International Education) 

1. Commission on Licensure (District of Columbia) 

1929. Makes the Commissioner of Education an ex-officio member. 
(P.L. 70-831, as amended) 45 Stat. 1326, 2 D.C. Code 103. 

2. Committee on Education, National Advisory 

1/ 
1954. Authorizes appointment of a National Advisory Committee on 
Education to advise the Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare, 
on the initiation and conduct of studies of problems of national 
concern in the field of education and on appropriate action as the 
xewtlt theire^;.- (p.L. 83-532) 68 Stat. 533; 20 U.S.C. 331. 

3. Council on Education for Health Professions, National Advisory 

1963. Makes the Commissioner of Education an ex-officio member. 
(P.L. 88-129) 77 Stat. 169; 42 U.S.C. 293(e). 

4. Council on Nurse Training, National Advisory 

1964. Makes the Commissioner of Education an ex-officio member. 
(P.L. 88-581) 78 Stat. 917; 42 U.S.C. 298. 

5. Performing Arts, John F. Kennedy Center for 

1958. Makes the Commissioner of Education an ex-officio member of 
the Board of Trustees. (P.L. 85-874, as amended) 74 Stat. 1698. 



1/ No members appointed; no funds provided. 



II - 41 



Program Direction and Services 

PROGRAM To develop professional publications and conduct informational 
OBJECTIVES services for effective transmission of facts needed for guidance 
and leadership in the field of education. To develop legislative 
programs keyed to the needs of American education, as well as 
appropriately related to the role of the Federal Government in 
education. To provide effective and economical management 
which will help accomplish program operations and objectives. 
To provide central direction to assure a coordinated and 
integrated program in the Office. To effect coordination of 
regional staff. 



EXTENT OF 
THE PROBLEM 



Interest in improved education has resulted in substantially 
increased demands for services to the public, the States, and 
the Congress and in the Executive Branch in the field of 
legislation. Professional and public interest in education 
places heavy responsibility on the Office to determine sound 
policy and program objectives . 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



Determines policy and program objectives; provides executive 
leadership and management services for operations; coordinates 
Office activities with programs within the Department; provides 
liaison with Executive, Legislative, and Judicial Branches of 
the Government; and advises with national, State and local 
officials on educational problems; provides information and 
services on educational legislation. Disseminates information 
resulting from studies and research. Conducts studies of 
Federal programs in education. Represents the Commissioner 
and the Office in field relationships; coordinates Office 
activities in the field; and administers a program to meet 
civilian education needs, including the Civil Defense Adult 
Education Program in the event of a national disaster; and, 
beginning in fiscal year 1965, administers the Civil Rights 
Education Program. 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



See Digest of Legislation. 



SOURCE 
OF FUNDS 



Annual appropriations to the Office of Education. 



II - k2 



Program Direction and Services - Statistical Summary 



ORGANIZATION OF PROGRAM DIRECTION AND SERVICES (June 30, 1964) 



Unit Employees 

Office of the Commissioner 33 
Office of Program and 

Legislative Planning 31 



U nit Employees 
Office of Information 28 
Office of Administration 110 
Office of Field Services 26 



Total 



228 



PERSONNEL (as of June 30] 


I 1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 




Paid employment 


206 


209 


208 


226 


228 




In DoC. area 


171 


183 


182 


192 


192 




Outside D.C. area 


18 


17 


17 


14 


12 




Transferred and 














reimbursed funds 


17 


9 


9 


20 


24 




FUNDS (fiscal ye'arT" 


i960 


(i 


1962 
.n thousam 


1963 


J.yb4 


1965 




is) 




Total available 


$2,437 


$3,018 


$3,107 


$5,407 


$6,211 


$15,382 


Appropriations : 


$1,467 


?1,670 


?2,068 


SI, 965 


S2,154 


$11,098 


Grants and Loans 





— — — 


~ •" ~ 


~~ " 


_ __ 


6,000 


Direct Operations 













5,098 


Transfer from: 














Civil Defense 


947 


1,303 


1,019 


3,381 


3^653 


4,006 


Adminis tratlon 


14 


103 


122 


84 


139 


187 


Contracts 


933 


1,200 


897 


3,297 


3,514 


3,819 


Manpower Development 














and Training Act 








— »- 


61 


162 


278 


National Science 














Foundation 


23 


45 


20 










School Dropout 














Program 





-_- 


— 


__ — 


242 


--- 


Funds available for 














Direct Operations 


1,504 


1,818 


2,210 


2,110 


2,455 


3,592 


Contracts 


933 


1,200 


897 


3,297 


3,514 


3,819 


Grants 












242 


■■MM 


PROGRAM STATISTICS (fiscal year) 














1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 




Publications printed: 


191 


176 


184 


219 


175 




New titles 


110 


126 


88 


148 


144 




Reprint titles 


81 


50 


96 


71 


31 




Printed publications 














distributed: 














Free 1 . 


,746,306 1 


,950,000 1 


,845,730 2 


,287,540 2 


,500,086 




Sold 


689,832 


551,393 


625,646 


261,868 


385,527 




Duplicated publications 














distributed free 1. 


,599,000 2 


,558,000 2 


,076,500 2 


,214,242 


840,882 




Inquiries answered 


120,319 


135,880 


140,765 


159,301 


158,222 




Convention exhibits 


18 


12 


17 


17 


15 




Audience 


165,220 


107,725 


145,030 


143,450 


119,650 




Press releases 


151 


67 


60 


31 


93 





II - k-3 



Bureau of Educational Assistance Programs 

BUREAU Its primary responsibility is to promote the cause of education 
RESP0NS1- through programs of financial assistance in areas designated in 
BILIT1ES the national interest. Surveys, studies, and consultations are 
performed in related and other selected areas. In carrying out 
its mission, the Bureau cooperates with State and local educa- 
tional agencies, colleges and universities, education associa- 
tions, and other private organizations. 

SCOPE OF Financial assistance is provided for vocational and technical 
ACTIVITIES education, for construction and operation of schools in feder- 
ally impacted areas, for the strengthening of instruction in 
selected subjects in elementary and secondary schools, for 
expansion of guidance services, and for financial assistance 
to institutions of higher education for providing aid to 
students and for the conduct of certain educational programs. 

Bureau personnel perform consultative services on education 
problems, furnishing States and other appropriate agencies 
with information to help them make more effective use of 
Federal, State, and local funds. These services include con- 
ducting national surveys, studies, and conferences, producing 
curriculum guides and materials which help to raise standards 
of quality and strengthen American education. 

BUREAU The Bureau administers five major programs of financial assist- 
PROGRAMS ance to all levels of education: (1) grants to local school 

districts for the construction and operation of elementary and 
secondary schools in federally affected areas (Public Laws 815 
and 874); (2) grants to States for strengthening instruction 
in science, mathematics, and modern foreign languages in 
elementary and secondary schools and for maintaining and 
improving guidance services (titles III and V-A of the National 
Defense Education Act); (3) grants to States for vocational and 
technical education and manpower training (Smith-Hughes Act, 
George-Barden Act, Area Redevelopment Act of 1961, the Manpower 
Development and Training Act of 1962, and the Vocational Act 
of 1963); (4) programs of assistance to institutions of higher 
education to provide financial aid to students, strengthen 
graduate education, train guidance counselors and modern 
foreign language teachers, and strengthen language 
instruction (titles II, IV, V-B, and VI of NDEA and the 
Fulbright-Hays and Land-Grant Acts.) Educational assist- 
ance is also provided to Cuban refugees through certain of 
these programs; (5) grants for construction of educational 
television facilities. 



II - H 



Bureau of Educational Assistance Programs--Statistical Summary 
ASSOCIATE COMMISSIOHER FOR EDUCATIONAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS: Arthur L. Harris 



ORGANIZATION (June 30, 1964) 

Unit 
Office of the Associate Commissioner 
Division of Vocational and Technical Education 
Division of School Assistance in Federally 

Affected Areas 
Division of State Grants 

Division of College and University Assistance 
Manpower Development and Training Activities 
Area Redevelopment Program 
Educational Television Facilities 



TOTAL 



Employees 
29 
78 

156 
74 

118 
65 
12 

545 



PERSONNEL (as of June 30) 



1960 



1961 



1962 



1963 



1964 



Paid employment 




418 


412 


464 


515 


546 




In D.C. Area 




336 


325 


375 


360 


366 




Outside D.C. Area 




82 


87 


82 


79 


82 




Transferred Funds: 
















In D.C. Area 




- 


• 


7 


54 


68 




Outside D.C. Area 




- 


- 


- 


22 


30 




FUNDS (fiscal vear) 




1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 


1965 (est.) 








(in thousands) 






Total available 


$452,624 


$515,064 


$582,279 


$678,641 


$749,311 


$945,021 


Appropriations 


452,624 


514,055 


573,852 


630,457 


650,772 


918,795 


Transfer from 
















Dept. of Labor: 
















Manpower Development 














& Training Act 
















Administration 




- 


- 


- 


548 


843 


N.A. 


Grants 




- 


- 


- 


34,000 


79,455 


N.A. 


Area Redevelopment 


Act 














Administration 




- 


- 


83 


180 


149 


207 


Grants 




- 


- 


2,881 


3,284 


3,265 


3,335 


Dept. of HEW: 
















Cuban Refugee Program 














Administration 




- 


- 


- 


24 


40 


46 


Grants & Loans 




- 


1,009 


5,463 


9,440 


9,604 


9,723 


Educational Television 














Facilities 
















Administration 




- 


. 


. 


27 


145 


215 


Grants 




" 


" 


• 


1,460 


6,215 


12,700 



II - k5 



Funds available for 


1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 


1965 (est. 


,) 


Direct operations 


$3,813 


$4,044 


$4,304 


$5,322 


$6,077 


$6,898 




Grants : 
















land-Grant Colleges 


5,052 


5,052 


10,744 


14,500 


14,500 


14,500 




Land -Grant College Aid 


2,225 


3,775 


- 


- 


- 




Current Operating 
















Expense, SAFA 


186,300 


217,300 


247,000 


282,322 


320,670 


332,000 




Construction, SAFA 
















Appropriations 


60,135 


62,492 


61,042 


62,886 


22,940 


57,580 




Obligations 


66,368 


54,060 


63,342 


55,292 


21,252 


65,000 




Transfer to HHFA for 
















Technical Services 
















Appropriations 


1,000 


900 


900 


800 


800 


820 




Obligations 


994 


923 


848 


772 


800 


820 




Sal th- Hughes 


7,161 


7,170 


7,161 


7,161 


7,161 


7,161 




George - Barden 


33,702 


33,672 


33,672 


34,716 


34,756 


34,796 




Voc. Ed. Act of 1963 












123,500* 




Area Vocational - 
















NDEA VIII 


7,000 


9,000 


12,800 


15,000 


15,000 


15,000 




NDEA-III & V-A 
















Appropriations 


71,800 


66,270 


66,270 


66,270 


62,000 


96,100 




Obligations 


63,603 


47,327 


61,398 


60,933 


95,794 


96,085 




NDEA-IV, V-B, VI, XI* 


28,761 


40,989 


44,612 


43,700 


43,700 


82,740 




Loans: 
















NDEA-II, III 
















Appropri at ion s 


47,900 


64,941 


81,655 


97,780 


123,168 


147,700 




Obligations 


41,062 


107,292 


75,236 


91,448 


109,737 


147,700 




Cuban Refugee Program 
















(Grants & Loans) 


- 


1,009 


5,463 


9,440 


9,604 


9,723 




Manpower Development and 














Training Act (Grants) 


- 


- 


- 


34,000 


79,455 


N.A. 




Area Redevelopment Act 
















(Grants) 


- 


- 


2,881 


3,284 


3,265 


3,335 




Educational Television 
















Facilities (Grants) 


— 


• 


• 


1,460 


6,215* 


12,700 

—*- — ...n 





* New in Fiscal Year 1965 



II - 46 



College and University Assistance 

PROGRAM To administer programs of financial aid to students and 
OBJECTIVES institutions of higher education; specifically, the four 

higher education programs of the National Defense Education 
Act, Federal funds for land- grant colleges and universities, 
and the work-study program of the -Economic Opportunity Act 
of 1964. 

EXTENT OF To enable colleges and universities to provide the quality 
PROBLEM of education required to assure the fullest development of 
the mental resources and skills of the Nation's young men 
and women, it is of vital importance - especially in the 
face of rising costs and enrollments - that necessary 
financial assistance be made available both to students and 
to the institutions of higher education they attend. 

In addition, students from low-income families who want to 
go to college usually find themselves required to assume a 
heavy burden of debt which may seriously handicap them in 
their later careers. Part-time employment, combined as far 
as possible with loans or scholarships, offers such students 
a way of meeting college expenses without mortgaging their 
futures, besides providing them with valuable work experience. 

PROGRAM NDEA funds are provided for loans to college students, title 
SCOPE II, (including special funds for loans to Cuban refugees 

thru attending United States institutions of higher education); 
FY 196^ for graduate fellowships, title IV; for counseling and 

guidance training institutes, Part B of title V; and for 
foreign language development, title VI, including language 
and area centers, modern foreign language fellowships, 
language research and studies, and language institutes. 
In addition, funds are provided for the support of instruc- 
tion in land-grant colleges and universities. Finally, funds 
are" provided to support part-time employment - either on- 
campus or off-campus - for academically qualified students 
from low income families to enable them to finance their 
higher education. 

*Under amendment to NDEA, effective December 19&3; a H higher 
education titles, due to expire June 30, 19^4, were extended 
for one year, to June 30, 1J&5 • Significant amendments to 
each higher education title were as follows : 

^Additional substantial amendments made October 1964 are 
described in the NDEA Program Summary at the end of this 
chapter . 



II - hj 



Title II - Authorization increased to $125 million for FY 1964 
and to $135 million for FY 1965; institutional ceiling on 
Federal Capital Contribution raised from $250,000 to $800,000; 
teacher forgiveness provisions extended to teachers serving in 
elementary and secondary overseas schools of the U.S. Armed 
Forces and in schools conducted by the Federal Government 
within the States; deferment on loan interest and repayments 
extended to students continuing their education in institutions 
of higher education outside the United States. 

Title IV - Re-awarding of vacated fellowships permitted; cost- 
of-education allowance to institutions placed on a flat-grant 
basis of $2,500 per year. 

Title V(B) - Program extended to include personnel engaged in 
or perparing to engage in counseling and guidance of students 
who are not below grade 7 in elementary or secondary schools. 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



Title VI - Modern Foreign Language Institutes provision broad- 
ened to permit institutes for teachers of English as a second 
language . 

See Digest of Legislation. 



SOURCE OF Annual appropriations to Office of Education, permanent appro- 
FUNDS priation of $2.55 million (Morrill-Nelson) for land- grant 

colleges; and transfers from other Government agencies. 

Work- study funds not appropriated as of October 1, 196k. 

ADVISORY Advisory Committee on Graduate Fellowships, Advisory Committee 
GROUPS on Counseling and Guidance Training Institutes, Advisory 
Committee on Language Development. 



College and University Assistance—Statistical Summary 
DIRECTOR: Kenneth W. Mildenberger 



ORGANIZATION (June 30, 1964) 

Unit 
Office of Director 
Field Operations Staff 
Counseling & Guidance Institutes Branch 
Graduate Fellowship Branch 
Language Development Branch 
Student Financial Aid Branch 

Total 



Employees 
12 
18 
12 
9 
35 
32 

118 



II - 1+8 



FUNDS (fiscal year) 


1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 


1965 (est.) 








(in thousands) 






Total available 


$74,513 


$107,062 


$135,655 


$151,083 


$183,004 


$246,940 


Appropriations 


74,513 


106,727 


134,306 


149,500 


180,368 


243,940 


Transfer (Cuban 














Refugee Program) 




335 


1,349 


1,583 


2,636 


3,000 


Funds available for 














Grants : 














Land-Grant Colleges 


5,052 


5,052 


10,744 


14,500 


14,500 


14,500 


Land -Grant College Aid 




2,225 


3,775 








NDEA- Title IV 


12,650 


20,690 


22,262 


21,200 


21,200 


32,740 


NDEA - Title V-B 


5,491 


6,500 


7,100 


7,250 


7,250 


7,250 


NDEA - Title VI 














Appropriations 


10,620 


13,799 


15,250 


15,250 


15,250 


13,000 


Obligations 




13,022 


15,248 


15,220 


15,250 


10,122 


NDEA - Title XI* 












29,750 


Loans: 














NDEA - Title II 














Appropriations 


40,700 


58,461 


75,175 


91,300 


122,168 


146,700 


Obligations 




106.641 


74,564 


90,832 


109,216 


146,700 


Transfer to OE 














Cuban Refugee Program 














(Grants & Loans) 




335 


1,349 


1,583 


2,636 


3,000 


PROGRAM STATISTICS 


1960 1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 (i 






est.) 


Title II - Student Loans 















Participating institutions 1,363 
Student borrowers 115,450 
Average loan $438 

Title IV - Graduate Fellowships 

Fellowships awarded 1,500 
Approved graduate programs 474 
Participating institutions 139 

Title V-B - Counseling and Guidance 



Training Institutes 
Institutes 

Enrollees 



103 
3,356 



Title VI - Language Development 
Language and Area Centers 
Centers 46 

Institutions 30 

Languages supported 44 



1,417 

151,068 

$470 



1,500 
678 
149 



93 
3,126 



47 
33 

48 



1,47k 1,536 

186,465 216,930 

$478 $478 



1,500 1,500 
810 935 
161 166 



87 76 
2,567 2,260 



53 
33 

52 



55 
34 
56 



1,574 

264,000 

$490 



1,500 

1,052 

168 



64 
1,920 



55 
34 
66 



Language Fellowshins 
Fellowships awarded 
Languages studied 
Institutions 

Research and Studies 


474 
31 
34 

95 

42 
2,145 


769 
43 
47 

50 

75 
3,876 


1 
4, 


,004 
55 
59 

42 

85 
418 


1 
4, 


,035 
59 
56 

33 

83 
336 


1,074 
58 
52 


Contracts negotiated 
Language Institutes 


47 


Institutes 
Enrollees 


85 
4,368 



II - k9 



Educational Television Facilities Program 



PROGRAM To administer Public Law 37-447, the purpose of which is 
OBJECTIVES to assist, through matching grants, in the construction 

of noncommercial educational television broadcasting 

stations. 



EXTENT OF 
PROBLEM 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



Prior to this legislation, approximately 30 educational 
television stations were constructed throughout the 
country. Since 1952, the Federal Communications 
Commission has reserved more than 300 TV frequencies 
exclusively for educational use. Existing stations have 
demonstrated an increasingly important role during that 
period as an instrument of education at local, State, 
and regional levels. The additional activation of 
reserved channels needed in many more communities, 
however, has been impeded by the high capital costs 
required for construction. Public Law 87-447 provides 
for matching grants to qualified applicants to acquire 
essential transmission apparatus. 

Legislation authorizes $32,000,000 over a five-year 
period, terminating June 30, 1968, and provides that a 
maximum of $1,000,000 in Federal funds may be awarded 
applicants in any one State. Grants are made only for 
transmission apparatus (as defined in published list of 
eligible equipment) to be used to activate or to expand 
ETV stations on channels in the UHF and VHF band 
reserved for educational use by the FCC. Federal 
matching rate is not to exceed 50 percent of eligible 
project cost (plus, in some cases, a credit factor of 
25 percent of the cost of ETV apparatus previously owned 
by applicant). Criteria for evaluation of applications 
relate the need for an ETV service to local, State, and 
regional plans and the development of broad-range 
educational television broadcast service. 



Authority to recommend grant action is delegated to the 
Commissioner of Education, and applications are 
processed and evaluated in the Office of Education. 
Policy determinations are delegated to the Assistant to 
the Under Secretary (ETV). 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



See Digest of Legislation. 



SOURCE OF Annual appropriations to the Office of the Secretary, 
FUNDS subsequently transferred to the Office of Education. 
Funds do not lapse. 



II - 50 



Educational Television Facilities Program--Statistical Summary 



DIRECTOR : "Raymond J Stanley 

ORGANIZATION (June 30, 1964) 

Unit 
Office of the Director 



Employees 
13 



FUNDS (fiscal year) 

Total available 
Transfer from 
Depto of HEW 

Funds available for 
Direct operations: 

Transfer from HEW 

Obligations 
Grants: 

Transfer from HEW 

Obligations 



1963 1964 1965 (est.) 

(in thousands) 
$1,487 $6,360 $12,915 



27 
15 

1,460 



145 
137 

6,215 

5,195 



215 



12,700 



PROGRAM STATISTICS 

Number of grants awarded : 
Activate new channels 
Expand existing channels 

Number of grant applications pending : 
Activate new channels 
Expand existing channels 

Amount of grants awarded : 
Activate new channels 
Expand existing channels 

Amount of grant applications pending : 
Activate new channels 
Expand existing channels 

Population receiving new or improved 
ETV service 



1963 



1964 





34 


-- 


18 


— 


16 


1 


34 


1 


17 


— 


17 


-- 


(in thousands) $5,739 
3,336 


-- 


2,403 


$339 
339 


7,343 
4,167 


— 


3,176 



41,000 



II - 51 



School Assistance in Federally Affected Areas 

PROGRAM To compensate school districts for burdens imposed on them 
OBJECTIVES by Federal activities such as ownership of land by the 

Federal Government (largely military installations) and an 
influx of school children whose parents live on or are 
employed on non- taxable Federal property or are otherwise 
engaged in activities of the United States; to construct 
and arrange for operation of schools on Federal installa- 
tions when local agencies cannot accept the responsibility 
for education of pupils residing on Federal property. 

EXTENT OF About 5,000 eligible applicants have claimed and received 
PROBLEM funds under these programs; about 4,800 local school dis- 
tricts under Public Law 874 and about 1,900 local school 
districts under Public Law 815. 

PRESENT Payments are made currently to over 4,000 eligible appli- 
PROGRAM cants based on over 2 million eligible pupils under Public 
SCOPE Law 874. During the 14 years of the construction program 
(Public Law 815) about 1,900 eligible applicants have 
received approval for 5,532 projects to construct over 
60,000 classrooms and related facilities to house about 
1,800,000 pupils; of these, 357 projects were constructed 
for Federal agencies on Federal property. 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



See Digest of Legislation* 



SOURCE OF 
FUNDS 



Annual appropriation to the Office of Education. 



ADVISORY 
GROUPS 



Consultants as needed. 



II - 52 



School Assistance in Federally Affected Areas--Statistical Summary 
ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER, DIVISION OF SAFA : Rail I. Grigsby 
ORGANIZATION (June 30, 1964) 



Unit 






Employees 






Office of Director 






6 






Technical Operations Branch 






79 






Field Operations ! 


Branch 






71 










Total 


} 


56 






FUNDS (fiscal year) 


1960 


1961 


1962 


lWi " 


196Alest.; 


1965 (est.) 






(in thousand 


Is) 






Total available 


$247,435 


$281,366 


$313,056 


$353,865 


$351,378 


$397,123 


Appropriations 


247,435 


280,692 


308 ,942 


346,008 


344,410 


390,400 


Transfer (Cuban Refugees) 


— 


674 


4,114 


7,857 


6,968 


6,723 


Funds available for 














Grants: 














Construction 














Appropr iations 


60,135 


62,492 


61,042 


62,886 


22,940 


57,580 


Obligations 


66,368 


54,060 


63,342 


55,292 


21,252 


65,000 


Current Oper. Exp. 


186,300 


217,300 


247,000 


282,322 


320,670 


332,000 


Transfer to HHFA for 














Technical Services 














Appropriations 


1,000 


900 


900 


800 


800 


820 


Obligations 


994 


923 


848 


772 


80,0 


820 


Cuban Refugee Program 


~ ~ 


674 


4,114 


7,857 


6,968 


6,723 



II - 53 



PROGRAM STATISTICS 

Public Law 815, As Amended, Construction Projects for 5-Year Period, 
Fiscal Years 1960-1964 





1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 


(Est.) 


Projects 














Received 


836 


393 


592 


265 


285 




Reserved 


307 


268 


250 


175 


92 




Approved 


404 


295 


191 


200 


145 




Under Constr. 74 


94 


79 


81 


76 




Completed 


369 


403 


327 


340 


258 




Funds 




(in 


thousand 


s) 






Allocated 


$61,135 


$86,392 


$61,942 


$63,686 


$23,740 




Reserved 


77,294 


51,886 


64,193 


54,523 


23,113 




Paid 


88,988 


71,042 


56,495 


59,945 


50,440 




Public Law 874, As Amended, Maintenance and Operation of Schools 


Entitlements: 


1/ 


(in 


thousand 


s) 








1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 


(Est.) 


Total 


$184,979 


$214,768 


$246,633 


$264,621 


$301,154 




Local 


175,786 


203,234 


233,253 


250,069 


283,775 




Federal 


9,193 


11,534 


13,380 


14,552 


17,379 




Eligible 














Applicants: 














Total 


3,839 


4,013 


4,121 


4,149 


3,937 




Local 


3,794 


3,965 


4,065 


4,084 


3,877 




Federal 


45 


48 


56 


65 


60 




Local and Federal 












pupils on which 












payments were 














made. 


1,528 


1,656 


1,792 


1,839 


1,949 





1/ Fiscal year figures subject to adjustment. 



II - 54 



State Grants (Titles III, V-A, NDEA) 



PROGRAM 
OBJECTIVES 
Through 
Fiscal Year 

1964* 
EXTENT OF 
PROBLEM 



PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



To strengthen instruction in science, mathematics, and 
modern for eign languages, and to establish and main- 
tain programs of testing and guidance and counseling. 

In the National Defense Education Act of 1958, the 
Congress declared that the defense of this Nation 
depended upon the mastery of modern techniques developed 
from complex scientific principles and upon the discovery 
and development of new principles, new techniques, and 
new knowledge. The Congress said that we must increase 
our efforts to identify and educate more of the talent of 
our Nation and that this required programs that would 
correct existing imbalances in our educational programs 
which had led to an insufficient proportion of our 
population educated in science, mathematics and modern 
foreign languages. 

Federal grants are made to State educational agencies for 
one half of the cost of laboratory and other special 
equipment and of minor remodeling of school space for 
instruction limited to subjects in the three fields taught 
in public elementary and secondary schools. Enrollment in 
these grades was 40.2 million in the fall of 1963 and is 
projected to increase to 44. 8 million in 1970. Equipment 
for which these funds may be spent includes published 
materials other than textbooks, test-grading equipment, 
and specialized equipment for audiovisual libraries. 
Schools that may submit projects include public junior 
colleges, if considered secondary under State law, 
laboratory and other special schools, and schools of 
agencies of the United States, if they receive no other 
money under the Act. Loans are made to nonpublic schools 
for similar purposes. Other grants are made for State 
supervision and administration. All States and Territories 
participate except American Samoa, Canal Zone, and Wyoming. 
Under Title V-A, grants are made to all State and 
Territorial educational agencies with the same three 
exceptions for one half of the cost of programs of testing 
and guidance and counseling in public schools. The Office 
of Education also arranges by contract for the testing of 
some students in nonpublic schools. 

See Digest of Legislation? *and see NDEA Program Summary 
for amendments and expansions in Fiscal Year 1965 



SOURCE OF 
FUNDS 



Annual appropriations to the Office of Education. 



ADVISORY 
GROUPS 



Ad hoc groups as required. 



II - 55 



State Grants — Statistical Summary 



DIRECTOR ; Ralph J- Becker 
ORGANIZATION (June 30, 1964) 



Unit 








Employees 






Office of the Director 










7 






Grant and Loan Management Branch 








22 






Instructional Resources Branch 








18 






Guidance and Counseling Programs Branch 






27 












Total 




74 






FUNDS (fiscal year) 


1960 


1961 
( 


1962 
in thousand 


1963 
s) 


1964 


1965 (est. 


,) 


Total available 


$79,000 


$72,750 


$72,750 


$72,750 


$62,750 


$97,100 




Appropriations 


79,000 


72,750 


72,750 


72,750 


62,750 


97 , 100 




Funds available for 
















Grants: 
















NDEA - Title III 
















Equipment and 
















Remodeling 
















Appropriations 


52,800 


47,520 


47,520 


47,520 


1/ 


70,400 




Obligations 


46,335 


29,945 


44,120 


43,099 


77,431 


70,400 




Supervision and 
















Administration 
















Appropriations 


4,000 


3,750 


3,750 


3,750 


1/ 


5,200 




Obligations 


2,530 


2,414 


2,841 


2,885 


3,366 


5,200 




NDEA - Title V-A 
















Appropriations 


15,000 


15,000 


15,000 


15,000 


15,000 


,20,500 




Obligations 


14,737 


14,968 


14,437 


14,949 


14,997 


20,485 




Loans : 
















NDEA - Title III 
















Appropriations 


7,200 


6,480 


6,480 


6,480 


1/ 


1,000 




Obligations 


394 


651 


672 


616 


521 


1,000 





1/ FY 1964 appropriation for (a) grants to States for local acquisition 
of equipment and minor remodeling projects and State level supervision 
and administration and (b) loans to nonprofit private schools totaled 
$47,750,000. 



II - 56 



PROGRAM STATISTICS 



1960 



Number of approved 

projects for equipment 

'"y minor remodel ins 55,859 



1961 



1962 



1963 



1964 
(est. ) 



55,392 58,810 56,184 70,000 



Estimated cost of approved 

projects $105.5 

In science 79.3 

In mathematics 9.0 

In foreign languages 17.2 



(in millions) 

$94.3 $99.7 $105.5 $150.0 

69.5 72.1 77.5 110.2 

8.0 9.0 9.1 12.9 

17.3 18.6 18.9 26.9 



Number of classrooms and 

laboratories to be 

remodeled under above 

projects 5.332 

In science 4,174 

In mathematics 628 

In foreign languages 530 



4,968 3,321 2,438 3,000 

3,524 2,086 1,723 2,121 

925 362 178 219 

519 873 537 660 



Full-time eouivalent 
State supervisors and 
consultants - SMFL 



203 



257 



250 



233 



238 



Number of full-time and 
part-time professional 
personnel in State-level 
guidance programs 



255 



256 



240 



257 



265 



Number of full-time 

professional personnel 
in State-level guidance 
programs 



156 



163 



166 



169 



173 



Number of full-time 

equivalent local secondary 
guidance and counseling 
personnel 18,739 



21,774 24,317 27,109 30,000 



Secondary counselor- 
student ratio 



1:640 



1:570 1:550 1:530 1:510 



Number of approved loans to 
nonprofit, private 
schools 



41 



46 



39 



44 



40 



II - 57 



Vocational and Technical Education and Manpower Training 
Part A: Vocational and Technical Education 

PROGRAM To maintain t extend and improve vocational and technical 
OBJECTIVES education and to develop new programs to assure that 

persons of all ages in all communities have ready access 
to training or retraining of high quality, realistic in 
the light of actual or anticipated opportunities for 
gainful employment and suited to their needs, interests, 
and abilities. 

EXTENT OF Rising population and increased use of automation and 
PROBLEM technology in business and industry have resulted in a 

demand for workers with high levels of skill and education. 
It is estimated that 26 million young people will seek work 
for the first time during the 1960's and that 7.5 million 
of them will not have completed high school. The rate of 
unemployment has been about 5 percent of the labor force 
in recent years. These figures indicate the need for 
expanded occupational training programs that are responsive 
to changes in the economy. Training or retraining is 
needed by youth preparing to enter the labor market, the 
unemployed and veteran workers who face job obsolescence 
and need to upgrade or change skills. 

PRESENT Federal grants are made to help support training for any 
PROGRAM occupation other than the professions; for services to 
SCOPE assure high quality programs, such as teacher training and 
supervision, evaluation, demonstration and experimental 
projects and development of instructional materials and 
equipment; for vocational counseling and guidance; for 
construction of area vocational school facilities; for 
experimentation with residential vocational schools, and 
work-study programs for those who need earnings to stay in 
school; for research and experimental and pilot programs 
designed to solve problems of training the culturally and 
academically handicapped. 

RECENT P.L. 88-210 of 1963 authorized a permanent program of 
CHANGES Federal support for vocational and technical programs in 

a wide variety of institutions; continued existing vocational 
education statutes but amended them to permit funds to be 
transferred from one occupational category of training 
to another; made permanent the practical nurse training 
program (Title II of the George-Barden Act) and the area 
vocational school program for training of highly skilled 
technicians CTitle VIII of the National Defense Education 
Act) ; provided for grants by the U.S. Commissioner of 



II - 58 



Education to support research and demonstration and 
experimental projects to solve problems of training the 
socioeconomically handicapped; established 4-year pilot 
programs for (1) experiment with residential vocational 
schools and (2) work-study programs for disadvantaged 
youth o 

LEGAL See Digest of Legislation, 
BASIS 

SOURCE OF Annual appropriations to the U.S. Office of Education 
FUNDS under the Vocational Education Act of 1963, Smith-Hughes 
Act, George-Barden Act and other Statutes. 

ADVISORY State Advisory Committees; National Advisory Committee 
GROUPS to advise the U.S. Commissioner of Education, and a 

Review Council to be named by the Secretary of Health, 
Education, and Welfare to evaluate programs in 1966 and 
periodically thereafter. 



II - 59 



Vocational and Technical Education--Statistical Summary 
ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER FOR VOCATIONAL AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION ; Halter M. Arnold 



ORGANIZATION (June 30. 1964) 












Unit 


Employees 


Unit 


Employees 


Office of Director 




16 


Trade and 


Industrial 12 




Agricultural Education Branch 


14 


Education Branch 






Distributive Education Branch 


9 


Practical Nurse Education 4 




Hone Economics Education Branch 


15 


Area Vocational Education 










Branch 




8 












Total 78 




FUNDS (fiscal year) 


1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 


1965 (est.) 






(in thousand 


s) 






Total Available $ 


47.863 


$ 49.842 


$ 53.633 


$ 56.877 


$ 56.917 


$180,657 


Appropriations 


47,863 


49,842 


53,633 


56,877 


56,917 


180,657 


Funds available for Grants 


: 












Smith-Hughes 


7,161 


7,170 


7,161 


7,161 


7,161 


7,161 


George-Bard en 














Appropriations 


33,702 


33,672 


33,672 


34,716 


34,756 


34,796 


Voc. Ed. Act of 1963* 












123,500 


Area Voc. Educ.(NDEA) 


7,000 


9,000 


12,800 


15,000 


15,000 


15,000 


PROGRAM STATISTICS 


1932 


1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 




Enrollment, bv Class Type 


3,70 2 


3.768 


3.855 


4.072 


4.217 




Evening 


1,642 


1,686 


1,725 


1,824 


1,908 
(Adult) 




Part-time 


343 


341 


347 


329 


359 












(Post Secondary) 


Day 


1,717 


1,741 


1,783 


1,919 


1,950 
(Secondary) 




Enrollment, bv Program 


3.702 


3.768 


3.855 


4.072 


4.217 




Agriculture 


757 


796 


805 


823 


828 




Home Economics 


1,586 


1,588 


1,610 


1,725 


1,839 




Trades & Industry 


968 


939 


964 


1,005 


1,002 




Apprentices receiving 














related training in 














vocational program 1/ 


(133) 


(139) 


(132) 


(123) 


(132) 




Distributive Occupations 


311 


304 


306 


321 


309 




Practical Nursing 


31 


40 


47 


49 


54 




Area Vec. Educ.(NDEA) 


49 


101 


123 


149 


185 




Expenditures, bv Source 


228.314 


238.812 


254.074 


283.948 


308.899 




Federal 


41,399 


45,313 


48,010 


51,438 


54,582 




State 


79,534 


82,466 


89,155 


104,264 


112,685 




Local 


107,381 


111,033 


116,909 


128,246 


141,632 





1/ Included in trades and industry. 
* New in Fiscal Year 1965 



II 



60 



Part B: Manpower Training 

PROGRAM To provide training for any recognized occupation in 
OBJECTIVE which there is reasonable expectation of employment for 
unemployed and underemployed youth and adults who need 
training and basic education to obtain appropriate full- 
time work* 

EXTENT OF There is high unemployment at a time when many jobs are 
PROBLEM unfilled and when millions are unable to find work because 
they lack education and training. The skills of many 
veteran workers have become obsolete because of technological 
and other social and economic changes . 

PRESENT Manpower Development and Training Act grants are made to 
PROGRAM States to finance institutional training in public or 
SCOPE private educational institutions for persons referred by 
the Department of Labor* Basic education may be provided 
along with occupational training* Amendments enacted in 
December 1963, broadened the scope of the Manpower Act 
by 8 among other things: lowering the age of youths 
eligible to receive training allowances; allowing up to 
20 weeks of basic education in addition to 52 weeks of 
occupational training for trainees with educational 
handicaps; increasing weekly training allowances; per** 
mitting trainees to work up to 20 hours a week without 
losing eligibility for training allowances* and providing 
financial aid for relocation of trainees* 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



Assistance is also provided to the States under the Area 
Redevelopment Act for occupational training in areas 
designated by the Secretary of Commerce as economically 
depressed* 

Manpower Development and Training Act of 1962 (P.L* 87- 
415) 76 Stat. 23, 42 U.S.C. 2571-2620 as amended by 
(P.L. 88-214) 77 Stat. 422; Area Redevelopment Act 
(P.L. 87-27). 



SOURCE OF Funds are appropriated to the Department of Labor which 
FUNDS transfers money for training under both MDTA and ARA to 
the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. 



II - 6i 



Manpower Training--Statistical Sunmary 
ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER FOR VOCATIONAL AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION : Walter M. Arnold 
ORGANIZATION (June 30, 1964) 

Unit Employees 



Manpower Development and Training Program 65 
Area Redevelopment Program 12 

Total 77 






FUNDS (fiscal year) 1960 
Total available 


1961 1962 1963 
(in thousands) 

$ 2.881 $ 37.284 


1964 
$ 82.720 

79,455 
3,265 


1965 (est.) 
N.A. 


Transfer from Department 
of Labor for: 
Manpower 
Area Redevelopment 

Funds available for 


34,000 
2,881 3,284 


N.A. 
3,335 



Training Program Grants, 

ARA 
Training Program Grants, 

MDTA 



2,881 3,284 3,265 3,335 
34,000 79,455 N.A. 



PROGRAM STATISTICS 

ARA 
Fiscal Year No. Projects 

1962 147 

1963 329 

1964 304 



Trainees 


No. Proj 


MDTA 
ects 


Trainees 


9,074 


— 




m — 


13,754 


1,507 




57,444 


11,676 


1,938 




114,586 



II - 62 



Bureau of Educational Research and Development 

BUREAU To collect, verify, evaluate, interpret, and publish facts 
RESPONSI- and estimates on the status and trends of education in the 
BILITIES United States. To afford consultative and advisory services 
to school and college officials and others concerned with 
educational problems. To stimulate and support the conduct 
of educational research and demonstration by public and pri- 
vate institutions. To administer financial assistance for 
certain types of programs closely related to those of 
particular units of the Bureau. 

SCOPE OF The concerns of the Bureau extend to the acquisition and 
ACTIVITIES dissemination of knowledge about every significant aspect 
of education. Areas of emphasis include: talent develop- 
ment and creativity; curriculum improvement with special 
attention to science, English and the social studies; the 
encouragement of appreciation and performance in the arts; 
the special educational problems of the deaf, the aging, 
the blind, the mentally retarded, workers displaced by 
automation or by changing economic patterns, and other 
special groups; the unusual educational needs of the juvenile 
delinquent and of the culturally disadvantaged; recruitment 
and retention of good teachers; financial problems of 
American education; the expansion of library services; 
library construction; educational needs in central cities; 
urban communities, and rural areas; junior colleges and 
technological institutions; the roles of museums and other 
cultural institutions. 



BUREAU 
PROGRAMS 



In addition to conducting and reporting on surveys and studies, 
the Bureau administers three programs of extramural research: 
Cooperative Research; Education and Training Films for the 
Deaf; and Educational Media. The Bureau also administers: 
grants to States for improvement of educational statistics; 
scholarships for training teachers of the deaf; fellowships 
for educators concerned with the mentally retarded; grants 
for extension of library services. 

Educational Improvement for Handicapped Children 

and Youth 
Educational Organization and Administration 
Educational Research 
Educational Statistics 
Library Services 



II - 63 



Bureau of Educational Research and Development— Statistical Summary 



ASSOCIATE COMMISSIONER FOR EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT t Ralph C. M. Flynt 



ORGANIZATION (June 30. 1964) 














Dnit 










Employees 


Office of Associate Commissioner 








30 




Division of Educational Research 








133 




Division of Educational Statistics 








122 




Division of Educational Organization and Administration 




156 




Division of Library Services 










42 




Division of Handicapped Children and Youth 






_§i 












Total 


537 




PERSONNEL (as of June 30) 


1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 




Paid employment 


499 


489 


503 


504 


537 




In D.C. area 


484 


467 


471 


491 


533 




Transferred and 














reimbursed funds 


15 


22 


32 


13 


4 




FUNDS (fiscal year) 


1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 


~t955 






(in thousands) 




(est.) 


Total available SIS 0> 


$22,764 


$26,662 


$29,992 


$47,846 


$103,003 


Appropriations 


19,844 


22,606 


26,279 


29,688 


47,554 


102,849 


Transfer from: 














National Science 














Foundation 


— 


48 


82 


90 


30 


30 


National Institutes 














of Health 


10 


65 


21 


13 


55 




Housing and Home 














Finance Agency 


23 


25 


25 


26 


26 


26 


Department of Defense 


... 


— 


215 


95 


97 


63 


Department of HEW: 














Juvenile Delinquency 


— 


— 


40 


80 


84 


35 


White House Conference 














on Aging 


— 


20 


— 


— 


— 


— 



II - 6k 





1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 


1965 


Funds available for 












(est.) 


Direct Operations 


3,987 


4,477 


5,165 


5,140 


6,050 


6,633 


Grants: 














Expansion of Teaching in 














Education of the 














Mentally Retarded 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


... 


-- . 


Expansion of Teaching in 














Education of the Deaf 


... 


... 


1,500 


1,500 


•■«■«■ 


... 


Rural Libraries 














Appropriations 


7,431 


7,500 


7,500 


7,500 


7,500 


55,000 y 


Obligations 






8,231 




7,455 




NDEA (VII) 


2,689 


3,409 


2,763 


1,553 


1,610 


1,700 


NDEA (X) 














Appropriations 


1,139 


1,550 


1,520 


1,700 


1,920 


2,100 


Obligations 




1,300 






1,807 




Educational Improvement 














for the Handicapped 










14,000 


16,500 


Contracts? 














Cooperative Research 














Appropriations 


3,200 


3,357 


5,000 


6,985 


11,500 


15,840 


Obligations 






4,644 




11,498 




Captioned Films for 














the Deaf 


50 


150 


207 


525 


1,132 


1,384 


NDEA (VII) 


381 


1,321 


2,007 


3,447 


3,390 


3,263 


Special Foreign Currency 


«•*•■• 


«■«•> 


•»•»•■ 


338 


452 


429 



1/ Effective July 1, 1964, this program was expanded to Include libraries in urban 
areas and to provide funds forthe construction of public library facilities. 



II -65 



Educational Improvement for Handicapped Children and Youth 

PROGRAM To advance the educational opportunities for handicapped children 
OBJECTIVES and youth. To assist in the training of teachers for the handicapped. 
To identify and stimulate needed research and demonstration projects 
related to educational programs for the handicapped. To administer 
a program of educational and training films for the deaf. 

EXTENT OF There are an estimated 5 million school-age handicapped children 
PROBLEM in the United States in need of special education, hut only one-fourth 
are enrolled in special education programs. The greatest obstacle 
to the initiation and expansion of such programs is the extreme 
shortage of qualified personnel. Lack of scientifically tested 
knowledge is also a major problem. Further, there is a dearth of 
materials, such as training and educational films, for individuals 
who are deaf. 



PRESENT Program responsibilities include the administration of activities 
PROGRAM related to the education of children who are mentally retarded, hard 
SCOPE of hearing, deaf, speech impaired, visually handicapped, seriously 

emotionally disturbed, crippled, or otherwise health impaired. These 
include a grant program for training professional personnel in each 
area of the handicapped; a grant program to conduct research and 
demonstration projects; and a program to develop and distribute 
captioned films for the deaf. In addition, the Division conducts 
a series of intramural research studies and provides consultative 
services to State and local school systems, institutions of higher 
learning, State education agencies, and professional organizations 
on programs for the handicapped. 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



See Digest of Legislation. 



SOURCE 
OF FUNDS 



Annual appropriations to the Office of Education. 



ADVISORY Advisory Council on Education of Handicapped Children and Youth; 

GROUPS Advisory Committee on Research and Demonstration in the Education 
of Handicapped Children; Advisory Committee on Teacher Training - 
Crippled and Special Health Problems; Research and Demonstration 
Panel - Crippled and Special Health Problems; Advisory Committee on 
Teacher Training - Visually Handicapped; Research and Demonstration 
Panel - Visually Handicapped; Advisory Committee on Teacher Training - 
Deaf; Research and Demonstration Panel - Deaf; Advisory Committee 
on Teacher Training - Emotionally Disturbed; Research and Demonstra- 
tion Panel - Emotionally Disturbed; Advisory Committee on Teacher 
Training - Speech Impaired and Hard of Hearing; Research and Demonstra- 
tion Panel - Speech Impaired and Hard of Hearing; Advisory Committee 
on Teacher Training - Mentally Retarded; Research and Demonstration 
Panel - Mentally Retarded. 



II - 66 



Educational Improvement for Handicapped Children and Youth 

Statistical Summary 

DIRECTOR, DIVISION OF HANDICAPPED CHILDREN AMD 
YOUTH : Morvin A. Wirtz 

ORGANIZATION (June 30, 1964) 

Unit 
Office of the Director 

Research and Demonstrations Branch 9 



Physical and Sensory Handicaps 

Branch 14 



Employees Unit Employees 

7 Education of Mentally Retarded 
and Emotionally Disturbed 
Branch l4 

Captioned F ilm s for the Deaf 
Branch 10 



Total 



54 



FUNDS (fiscal year) 

Total available 
Appr opr iat i ons 

Funds available for 

Grants 

Fellowships, Traineeships , 

Scholarships 
Research and Demonstration 
Captioned Films for the Deaf 



1961 



1,000 
150 



2,500 
207 



2,500 
524 



13,000 
1,000 
1,380 



1965 



1962 1963 1964 
(funds in thousands) 
$1,150 $2,707 $3,024 $15,380 $17,880 
1,150 2,707 3,024 15,380 17,880 



14,500 
2,000 
1,380 



PROGRAM STATISTICS 

Programs for Training Professional Personnel in the Education of Handicapped Children 

Awards 

Institutions of Higher 
Learning (Training Pro- 
fessional Personnel) 
Cost (thousands) 

Institutions of Higher 

Learning (Stimulation Grants) 
Cost (thousands) 

State Educational Agencies 
(Professional Personnel) 
Cost (thousands) 



1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 


1965 (est.) 


68 
$387 


510 
$1,867 


509 
$1,873 


2,441 
$9,207 


2,980 
$11,000 


4 
$42 


6 
$63 


3 
$31 


42 

$683 


20 
$300 


96 
$564 


96 
$56l 


107 
$622 


2,420 
$3,147 


2,440 
$3,200 



II - 67 



AWARDS, cont'd 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 


1965 (est.) 


Research and Demonstration 
(Extramural Projects) 
Cost (thousands) 


- 


- 


- 


34 
$1,000 


25 
$2,000 


Captioned Films for the Deaf 
New Film Titles Acquired 
Total Film Prints Available 
Average Showing per Month 
Average Total Monthly Audience 


39 
91 


66 

254 

69 

7,781 


92 

2,475 

259 

25,873 


151 
3,900 

48l 

33,450 


160 

6,000 

600 

45,000 



_ 11-68 



Educational Organization and Administration 



PROGRAM To collect and disseminate basic information about the 
OBJECTIVES organization and administration of education at all levels, 
including elementary and secondary schools (State, county, 
and local school administration) , higher education insti- 
tutions, their facilities, staff needs, and finances; students, 
their distribution and characteristics; professional edu- 
cational personnel, requirements for, supply of, and 
characteristics; problems, trends, and developments. To 
furnish requested consultative, advisory, and survey services 
to States, counties, local school systems, institutions, and 
organizations. To study, investigate and propose solutions 
for specific problems of nationwide scope. To provide direct 
services to Federal officials and agencies in connection with 
problems or programs related to organization and administra- 
tion of education at all levels. 

EXTENT OF The Nation's schools, colleges and universities face problems 
PROBLEM of facilities, finances, and staffing that will continue to 

increase in magnitude and severity. The shortage of qualified 
educational personnel continues to be a problem at all edu- 
cational levels and is becoming increasingly severe in the 
senior high schools and in colleges and universities. Limited 
educational opportunities exist in many areas of the country. 
Economic deprivation has rendered many children disadvantaged 
for life. Organizational and administrative practices must 
be improved if our schools and institutions are to keep pace 
with the Nation's needs. 

PRESENT Functions include interpreting the national interest in 
PROGRAM education; furnishing essential information which enables 
SCOPE States and educational institutions to comprehend the nature 
and scope of trends in education; engaging in and reporting 
on surveys and special studies, and providing consultative and 
other studies. The present program activities are directly 
related to some of the principal problems: trends in the 
financing of public education by States and local school 
districts; special problems resulting from the concentration 
of low- income groups in urban areas; developments in church- 
state relations affecting education; trends in negotiations 
between teacher organizations and boards of education; edu- 
cational terminology and definitions; school housing; team 
teaching, ungraded schools, and other developments in the 
organization and administration of the school. The program 
activities at the higher education level are in the areas of 
student and faculty services, business administration, and 
general organization and administration, with special emphasis 



II - 69 



on facilities for higher education in the face of mounting 
enrollments, recruitment and education of teachers, and finan- 
cial support. A program has been initiated aimed specifically 
at problems related to the supply of and demand for educa- 
tional personnel at all levels. 

Additional functions assigned by statute or specifically 
delegated include an annual inspection of Howard University, 
advising the Department of Justice on approval of schools 
which may be attended by foreigners on student visas, advising 
the Housing and Home Finance Agency on loans for college 
housing, cooperation with Veterans Administration in certain 
relations with State approving agencies, preparing and main- 
taining a list of nationally recognized accrediting agencies 
and associations, processing of requests of Federal agencies 
for authorization to confer graduate degrees, certifying 
of American academic credentials of foreign students, making 
a special study of school attendance and child labor laws, 
determining the eligibility of institutions for participation 
in the program of grants for the construction of academic 
facilities, advising Public Health Service regarding insti- 
tutional eligibility for participation in the program of 
grants for the construction of teaching facilities, and 
publishing directories of higher education and reports of 
studies on educational organization and administration. 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



See Digest of Legislation. 



SOURCE 
OF FUNDS 



Annual appropriations to the Office of Education 



ADVISORY 
GROUPS 



Ad hoc groups as required. 



II - 70 



Educational Organization and Administration — Statistical Summary 
DIRECTOR. DIVISION OF EDUCATIONAL ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION : 
R. Orin Cornett 



ORGANIZATION (June 30, 1964) 



Unit 



Office of the Director 

Educational Personnel Branch 

Elementary and Secondary Organization and 

Administration Branch 
Higher Education Organization and 

Administration Branch 
College Housing Loan Program 



Employees 

15 
16 

81 

41 

3 

156 



Program Statistics (academic year) 

1960 1961 



Enrollment in 
Full -Time Public 
Day Schools 

Elementary 

Secondary 

Total 



24,349,932 
11,931,362 



24,603,352 
12,860,722 



1962 



25,263,661 
13,485,246 



1963 



25,816,893 
14,400,322 



1964 (est) 



26,100,000 
14,900,000 



36,281,294 37,464,074 38,748,907 40,217,215 41,000,000 



Classroom Teachers 
in Full-Time Public 
Day Schools 

Elementary 

Secondary 

Total 



858,249 
549,844 



869,072 
591,983 



886,161 
621,391 



908,536 
667,526 



939,600 
685,400 



1,408,093 1,461,055 1,507,552 1,576,062 1,625,000 



II - 71 



PROGRAM STATISTICS (academic year) 



Higher Education 
Institutions 

Public 2- year 
4- year 

Total Public 

Private 2-year 
4- year 
Total Private 



1960 

330 
255 
585 

368 
1,058 
1,426 



1961 

334 

369 
703 

259 
1,066 
1,325 



1962 



1963 



1964 



346 




366 


381 


375 




377 


381 


721 




743 


762 


247 




262 


263 


1,072 


1 


,095 


1,114 


1,319 


1 


,357 


1,377 



Total 
Institutions 



2,011 



2,028 



2,040 



2,100 



2,139 



Higher Education 
Enrollment (opening Fall) 

Public 2-year 356,922 393,553 458,296 

4- year 1,645,946 1,742,137 1,893,423 

Total Public 2,002,868 2,135,690 2,351,719 



520,987 553,302 
2,075,917 2,319,521 
2,596,904 2,872,823' 



Private 2-year 
4- year 
Total Private 



54,573 
1,344,856 
1,399,429 



60,064 
1,414,2 53 



62,707 
1,476,8 04 



1,474,317 1,539,511 



71,341 74,504 
1,538,427 1,581,189 
1,609,768 1,655,693 



Total 
Enrollment 



3,402,297 3,610,007 3,891,230 4,206,672 4,528,516 



Earned Degrees Conferred 
Bachelor's or first 

professional 394,889 
Master's or second 

professional 74,497 

Doctor's 9,829 

Total Degrees 479,215 

Applications for desig- ^ 
nation as nationally recog- 
nized accrediting agency 
(Veterans' Readjustment 
Assistance Act of 1962 and 
National Defense Education 
Act of 1958 

Certification of Academic 
Credentials 1,579 

College Housing Loan 
Applications reviewed 

Petitions for approval 

of schools for foreign 
students (Immigration & 

Nationality Act of 1952) 
Surveys: Institutions 



401,656 

78,397 

10,575 

490,628 

2 



847 



420,485 450,592 491,000 



84,889 

11,622 

516,996 

5 



622 



91,418 

12,822 

554,832 

5 



816 



95 , 100 

13,200 

599,300 

3 



922 



80 


125 


82 


77 


52 


45 


55 


39 


60 


62 



17 



12 



46 



II - 72 



Educational Research 



PROGRAM 
OBJECTIVES 



EXTENT OF 
PROBLEM 



To advance improvements in education by developing ways 
to test and evaluate results and by demonstrating prac- 
tical application. To accelerate application of the 
new knowledge. To identify and stimulate research needed 
to fill gaps. 

The funds available for research in education have been 
insufficient to guarantee sustained attack on the wide 
spectrum of problems in education. The problems in 
theory, practice and personal student characteristics 
that affect academic achievement, are further compounded 
in the case of the handicapped, the culturally deprived 
and similar snecial groups. The absence of a central 
listing of research completed has led to a fragmented 
approach in many areas. Practical application lags far 
behind health and other fields. 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



The cooperative research program provides support — for re- 
search, surveys, and demonstrations — to State education 
agencies, colleges and universities. There is no restric- 
tion as to the field of education. Research so far has 
dealt largely with: mental retardation, teacher practices, 
creativity, finance, curriculum improvement (English, 
mathematics, science, and the social studies). Another 
extramural program provides research and experimentation 
in ways to use television, radio, motion pictures, and 
related media, for educational purposes; for demonstrations 
of such use; and for reporting information. The Educational 
Media program is carried out through grants and contracts 
with public and nonprofit private agencies, organizations 
and individuals. A third program provides for the establish- 
ment of science clubs for boys and girls throughout the 
nation. A reorganization, effective May 15, 1964, added staff 
to this Division from the previous Division of Elementary and 
Secondary Education; Higher Education and Continuing Education 
and Cultural Affairs. This reorganization will facilitate a 
closer relationship between research activities and subject 
matter specialists. 

Public Law 83-531; title VII, National Defense Education Act 
of 1958; Public Law 85-875, Science clubs for boys and girls. 



SOURCE 
OF FUNDS 



Annual appropriations to the Office of Education. 



ADVISORY 
GROUP 



Research Advisory Council; Advisory Committee on New Educational 
Media; and ad hoc groups as required. 



II - 73 



Educational Research—Statistical Summary 
DIRECTOR: Francis A. J. Ianni 



ORGANIZATION : (June 30, 1964) 

Unit 
Office of the Director 
Arts and Humanities Branch 
Media Research and Dissemination Branch 
Curriculum and Demonstration Branch 
Basic Research Branch 
Educational Research Information Center 



Total 



Employees 

18 

8 

26 

56 

19 

6 

133 



FUNDS : (fiscal year) 

Total available 
Appropriations 



1960 

$6,270 
$6,270 



1961 

$8,087 
$8,087 



1962 1963 



1964 



1965 



Transfers from 

National Science Foundation 
Department of Defense 
Welfare Administration, DHEW 
Vocational Rehabilitation Adm. , DHEW 
National Institutes of Health, DHEW 

Funds available for 



(in thousands) 
$9,770 $12,409 $17,082 
$9,770 $12,323 $16,929 



$21,219 
$21,219 



36 
50 



63 

30 

5 

55 



Grants : 














NDEA (VII) 


2,689 


3,409 


2,763 


1,553 


1,610 


1,700 


Contracts : 














NDEA (VII) 


381 


1,321 


2,007 


3,447 


3,390 


3,263 


Cooperative Research 


3,200 


3,357 


5,000 


6,985 


11,500 


15,840 


Special Foreign Currency 


- 


- 


- 


338 


429 


416 



PROGRAM STATISTICS 
(fiscal year) 

Cooperative Research 
Proposals Received 
Contracts Awarded 
Projects Completed 

Media Research and Dissemination 
Proposals Received 
Grants and Contracts Awarded 
Projects Completed 



1960 



324 
83 
42 



358 

114 

25 



1961 



394 
70 
48 



294 
80 
32 



1962 



438 

131 

53 



280 
70 
83 



1963 



469 

142 

60 



304 
63 
56 



1964 



1,129 
386 
100 



298 
69 
70 



1965 (est.) 



2,200 
300 
200 



325 
75 
70 



II - Ik 



Educational Statistics 

PROGRAM To provide more precise, up-to-date data on the status and 
OBJECTIVES trends of education. To achieve a coordinated Federal - 

State-local-institutional system of comparable basic data 
that serves the purpose both of the agencies and of the 
Federal Government. 



EXTENT OF 
PROBLEM 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



SOURCE OF 
FUNDS 



Education is a multibillion dollar enterprise. Assessment 
of the true state of education calls for information that 
is current, and capable of meaningful analysis and inter- 
pretation. There is an increasing demand for information 
in connection with planning, research, and the appraisal 
of our ability to produce manpower for domestic and for- 
eign program as well as to meet national needs. 

A reporting system for basic and derived data on important 
aspects such as curricula, enrollment, staff and facilities, 
at all levels of the educational system — publicly and pri- 
vately supported. Activities that contribute to the system 
are: the planning and conduct of large-scale data collec- 
tion and statistical processing operations; the development 
of technical improvements in machine and related procedures ; 
consultation and technical assistance in data processing; 
stimulation of the use of new methods for collecting, proc- 
essing, and analyzing data; surveys on a universe or sam- 
pling basis; and the administration of the grant program to 
State educational agencies for strengthening their statisti- 
cal services. 

Basic Act of 1867 and other laws (See Digest) authorizing 
specific programs, including title X of the National 
Defense Education Act of 1958. 

Annual appropriations to the Office of Education; funds 
transferred from the National Science Foundation and the 
Department of Defense. 



II - 75 



Educational Statistics - Statistical Summary 
DIRECTOR: Virgil R. Walker (Acting) 



ORGANIZATION (June 30, 


196U) 










Unit 


Employees 


Unit 




Employees 


Office of Director 


10 


Standards & Processing 


Branch 56 


Studies & Surveys Branch U7 


Field Programs 


Branch 


9 












Total 122 


FUNDS (fiscal year) 


1961 


1962 


1963 


196U 


1965 (est.) 






(in thousands) 




Total available 


$2,556 


$3,093 


$3,102* 


$3,395 


$3,808 


Appropriations 


2,14i3 


2,803 


2,990 


3,331 


3,778 


Transfer from: 












National Science 












Foundation 


U8 


72 


53 


30 


30 


National Institute 












of Health 


65 


3 


13 






Department of Defense 


215 


U5 


3k 




HEW 


— 


— 


3 


— _ 


— -- 


Funds available for 












Direct Operations 


1,006 


1,573 


1,U0U 


1,1*75 


1,708 


Grants: NDEA Title X 












Appropriations 


1,550 


1,520 


1,700 


1,920 


2,100 


Obligations 


1,300 










PROGRAM STATISTICS 


1961 


1962 


1963 


196U 


1965 (est.) 


Statistical Surveys 












Annual 


13 


1U 


18 


16 


18 


Biennial 


5 


h 


1 


5 


6 


Less frequent 


3 


h 


3 


7 


h 


Total 


21 


22 


22 


28 


28 


Improvement of State 


1961 


1962 


1963 


196h 


1965 (est.) 


Statistics 












States and Territories 










participating in NDEi 


1 










Title X 


IS 


Uh 


U8 


U9 


50 



II - 76 



Library Services 

PROGRAM To advance the education program of the Nation by providing 
OBJECTIVES leadership and coordination of the Nation's interest in the 
extension and improvement of adult education and library 
services at all levels, including the administration of the 
Library Services and Construction Act. To collect, analyze, 
and make available more precise, up-to-date information in 
these fields—more specifically, on literacy, fundamental 
and citizenship education, educational programs for the 
aging, library resources and services. 

EXTENT OF A fundamental purpose of education in the United States is to 
PROBLEM produce well-informed citizens, capable of exercising sound 
judgment throughout their lives on the complex problems of 
today's rapidly changing world. The need of education beyond 
the school years is indicated by the 1960 Census which showed 
some 8.3 million persons, age 25 and over (more than 8 percent 
of the total population), had completed less than five years 
of schooling. School, college and university, public, special, 
and research libraries—all have to provide improved services 
to our continually growing population. Public libraries are an 
indispensable component of education including self-education; 
yet, an Office of Education study reveals that 18 million per- 
sons have no legal access to public library service and 110 
million persons have only inadequate service available to them. 

PRESENT Gives special attention to the extension and improvement of in- 
PROGRAM formal education programs, including education for aging, com- 
SCOPE munity forums and discussion groups, university extension pro- 
grams, citizenship and literacy education. Collects, analyzes, 
and disseminates information and data on school, college, State, 
research, public library and library training resources, services, 
and promotion of adult education opportunities, including oppor- 
tunities for the aging. Administers the Library Services and 
Construction Act (P.L. 88-269) which amended the Library Services 
Act to provide for the development of library services in urban 
as well as rural areas; public library construction, and increased 
authorization. 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



Basic Act of 1867, the Library Services and Construction Act, 
and other laws (See Digest) authorizing specific programs. 



SOURCE 
OF FUNDS 



Annual appropriations to the Office of Education. 



ADVISORY 
GROUPS 



Advisory Committee on the Library Services Program. 



* Formerly Continuing Education and Cultural Affairs. Name changed with 
reorganization on 6/30/64 which transferred Cultural Affairs Branch to 
new Division of Educational Research as Arts and Humanities Branch. 



II - 77 



LIBRARY SERVICES DIVISION—Statistical Summary 
DIRECTOR : John G. Lorenz 
ORGANIZATION (June SO, 1964) 





Unit 




Employees 






Office of Director 




3 








Adult Education Branch 


8 








Library 


Services Branch 


31 












TOTAL 


42 






FUNDS (fiscal year) 


1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 


1965 








(in thousands) 






Total available 


$7,431 


$7,500 


$7,500 


$7,500 


$7,500 


$55,000 


Appropr lat Ions 


$7,431 


$7,500 


$7,500 


$7,500 


$7,500 


$55,000 


Funds available for 














Grants : 














Public Libraries 














Appropriations 


1/7,431 


7,500 


7,500 


7,500 


7,500 


— 


Obligations 






8,231 


7,406 


7,455 


~ — 



PROGRAM STATISTICS 

Library Services Program 
States Participating 



1960 



53 



1961 



52 



1962 



1963 



1964 



54 



1965 



Population receiving 34,000 

new or improved 

library services 

(est.) 2/ 
Professional 360 

librarians added 

in States 2/ 
Bookmobiles 

purchased 2/ 250 

Books and other 

informational 

materials added _?/ 6,000 



53 53 
(in thousands) 
36,000 38,000 39,600 42,000 



402 



312 



450 



350 



470 



370 



490 (Est.)- 



390 (Est.)- 



(in thousands) 
8,000 10,000 11,800 14,000 (Est.)- 



L/ $6.1 million in funds were available with the proviso that funds be allotted 
to the States on the basis of $7.5 million. 

2/ Data shown are cumulative. 



II - 78 



BUREAU OF HIGHER EDUCATION FACILITIES 

BUREAU To make grants and loans to public and other nonprofit institutions of 
RESPONSI- higher education in financing construction, rehabilitation, or improve- 
BILITIES ment of needed academic and related facilities. 

SCOPE OF Financial assistance is provided for the construction of classrooms, 
ACTIVI- laboratories, libraries and related facilities at undergraduate institu- 
TIES tions of higher education and for construction of academic facilities 
for graduate schools and cooperative graduate centers. 

Construction must result in a substantial expansion of the institution's 
student enrollment capacity or create urgently needed enrollment capacity 
in undergraduate institutions; or improve or establish graduate schools 
and cooperative graduate centers to increase the Nation's supply of 
critically needed professional personnel. 

Bureau personnel perform administrative procedures for the entire program 
and perform consultative services with the States, with colleges and 
universities, and with other appropriate agencies to help the institutions 
make effective use of Federal funds. 

BUREAU The Bureau administers four programs of financial assistance to 
PROGRAMS institutions of higher education (P.L. 88-204): (1) Grants to States 

for public community colleges and public technical institutes (Title I, 
sec. 103); (2) Grants to States for institutions of higher education 
other than public community colleges and public technical institutes 
(Title I, sec. 104); (3) Grants to institutions of higher education 
and to cooperative graduate center boards (Title II); and (4) Loans to 
institutions of higher education or to higher education building agencies 
(Title III). 



II - 79 



Bureau of Higher Education Facilities- 
Statistical Summary (No appropriations FY '64) 

Associate Commissioner For Higher Education Facilities : Peter P. Muirhead (Acting) 

Organization (June 30, 1964): Task Force of an estimated average of 10 full-time 

employees since December 1, 1963. 

Funds (fiscal year) 1965 

(in thousands of dollars) 

Total Available $464,236 

1. Grants for construction 

of facilities 

a. Public Community Colleges 

and Technical Institutes 50,600 

b. Other higher education 

facilities 179,400 

2. Grants for construction of 

graduate facilities 60,000 

3. Construction Loans 169,250 

4. Grants for State Administrative 

Expenses 3,000 

5. Technical Services 900 

6. Direct Operation 1,086 

TOTAL $464,236 



II - 80 



Bureau of International Education 



PROGRAM To provide information concerning education in other 
OBJECTIVES countries of value to educational interests in the United 
States; to provide advice, service, and leadership in the 
area of international education, including exchange of 
teachers, training programs for foreign educators, and 
recruitment of American educators for overseas assignments; 
to improve the teaching of modern foreign languages and 
area studies; and to support national policy and action 
abroad. To provide information concerning U.S. education 
to foreign educators and to international organizations. 

EXTENT OF Education has become an increasingly important part of our 
PROBLEM national foreign policy in promoting international cooper- 
ation and understanding. Among the emerging new nations 
many countries are seeking United States assistance in 
developing and improving their education. American edu- 
cational institutions are rapidly increasing their interest 
in, and efforts to inform students about, other countries 
and to improve competence in foreign language and area 
studies. Therefore, there is great need for more up-to-date 
and precise information on other nations and educational 
developments around the world. 

PRESENT The Bureau is responsible for studies in comparative edu- 
PR06RAM cation and collects and disseminates information to Inform 
SCOPE the American public of developments and trends in education 
abroad; and for the use of specialists in comparative and 
international education, educational institutions, and 
governmental and professional agencies. It collects and 
analyzes data and interprets their significance in terms of 
American education; provides extensive consultant service 
to both public and private educational institutions and 
organizations interested in international aspects of edu- 
cation; assists colleges, universities, and other insti- 
tutions in the interpretation of foreign student credentials. 
Technical assistance is provided for United States partici- 
pation in international meetings involving education. 
Materials on United States education are prepared for publi- 
cations issued by international organizations. A demonstration 
collection of educational materials and textbooks published 
in the United States and in foreign countries is available 
for examination by foreign and United States educators . 



II - 81 



LEGAL 
BASIS 

SOURCE OF 
FUNDS 

ADVISORY 
GROUPS 



Courses of study, materials from educational organizations 
in the United States, and data relating to education in 
other countries are also collected and maintained for 
research purposes. (See Special Foreign Currency Program.) 

Administrative grants for teachers, instructors, and 
assistant professors of modern foreign language and area 
studies to attend summer seminars or engage in study and 
research abroad in these fields are provided in Section 
102(b)(6), the Fulbright-Hays Act. 

The Bureau also administers the following programs under 
agreements with other Federal agencies: 

For Department of State and UNESCO : Assists the Agency for 
International Development in the development and evaluation 
of educational programs; recruits educators for service in 
United States Operations Missions and furnishes professional 
advice and assistance to the AID education staff, both in 
Washington and in foreign countries. Assists UNESCO in the 
recruitment of American educational specialists for its 
overseas educational programs. Plans and administers teacher- 
exchange and training programs for the Bureau of Educational 
and Cultural Affairs and recruits American teachers and school 
administrators for summer seminars and overseas assignments; 
and administers programs for teachers and educational leaders 
brought to this country by the AID; maintains a clearinghouse 
of information on educational exchanges. 

See Digest of Legislation. 



Annual appropriations to the Office of Education; funds trans- 
f erred from Department of State and other agencies. 

National Advisory Committee for the Exchange of Teachers. 
Ad hoc groups from time to time. 



II - 82 



Bureau of International Education—Statistical Summary 

ASSOCIATE COMMISSIONER FOR BUREAU OF INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION : Oliver J. Caldwell 

(Acting) 
ORGANIZATION (June 30, 1964) 

Unit Employees 

Office of Associate Commissioner 13 

Division of International Studies and Services 36 

Division of Technical Assistance and Exchange Programs 92 

Other 13 

Total 154 



PERSONNEL (as of June 30) 

Paid Employment 
In D.C. Area 

Office of Education 
Department of State 
CO 
AID 



1960 

137 

36 

41 
60 



1961 

136 

35 

43 
58 



1962 

135 

30 

46 
59 



1963 1964 
154 
43 



144 
37 



50 
57 



53 
58 



FUNDS (fiscal year) 1960 

Total available $4,416 

Appropriations 317 

Special Foreign Currency 

Appropriations 

Obligations 
102(b)(6) 

Appropriations 

Obligations 
Direct Operations 317 

Transfer from: 

Department of the Army 

Direct operations 

Training grants 
Department of State -Bureau 

of International Cultural 

Affairs 1,418 

Direct operations 309 

Training grants 1,109 



1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 (est.) 
(in thousands) 
$4.002 $4.093 $4.936 $7,590 $8,203 
365 391 516 2.071 2.147 



31 
24 



334 



8 
4 
4 



1,674 

361 

1,313 



391 

3 
11 



1.514 

399 

1,115 



62 
25 



48 
21 



71 
50 



1,500 1,500 

1,458 1,500 

454 523 576 

2 

3 
4 



2.166 


1.800 


2.015 


420 


488 


515 


1,746 


1,312 


1,500 



AID 


2.681 


1.955 


2,174 


2.247 


3.719 


4.041 


Direct operations 


363 


430 


431 


472 


492 


541 


Training grants 


2,318 


1,525 


1,743 


1,775 


3,227 


3,500 


Funds available for 














Direct operations 


989 


1,129 


1,224 


1,349 


1,503 


1,500 


Special Foreign Currency 














Appropriations 


- 


31 


- 


62 


48 


71 


Obligations 


- 


24 


- 


25 


21 


50 


Training grants 


3,427 


2 ,842 


2,869 


3,525 


2,468 


2,500 



II - 83 



PROGRAM STATISTICS 





1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 


1965 (est.) 


Section 102(b)(6) Fulbright-Hays 


Act 












One Year Study or Research Grants 








25 


25 


Summer Seminar Grants 










139 


140 


Foreign Specialists in Language 














and Area Studies 










15 


15 


Programmed by OE 














Teacher Exchanges: 














1-way to foreign 














country 


133 


130 


148 


142 


110 


120 


1-way to U.S. 


31 


46 


71 


79 


69 


70 


Interchanges 


300 


310 


280 


278 


264 


260 


Seminars 


155 


139 


227 


225 


232 


215 


Number of countries 


43 


41 


45 


46 


44 


40 


Teacher Development 














Program 


491 


540 


516 


478 


715 


658 


Number of countries 


67 


70 


64 


64 


76 


73 


Technical Training Program 


893 


769 


796 


822 


790 


850 


Number of countries 


50 


50 


55 


56 


53 


55 


Secondary and Nonprogram 














Foreign Visitors 


448 


618 


909 


2,057 


1,666 


2,000 


Nominated to vacant 














AID positions 


82 


65 


67 


7 


6 


15 


Recommended for expected 














AID vacancies 


- 


65 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Backstopping requests 














for AID 


102 


130 


113 


78 


65 


75 


Nominated for UNESCO 














positions 


223 


260 


172 


287 


300 


325 


Credentials evaluated 


4,437 


5,355 


6,085 


7,326 


8,472 


9,000 



II - 8k 





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II - 86 



NATIONAL DEFENSE EDUCATION ACT AMENDMENTS OF 1964 (RL.88-665) 

Wilbur J. Cohen and Francis Keppel 

The 88th Congress added to the list of its outstanding achievements 
in the field of education legislation, in passing, in the closing days of 
the session, the National Defense Education Act Amendments of 196^- 
(P.L. 88-665). 

On October l6, IS&h, President Johnson approved the legislation, which 
extends the Act for three years, through fiscal year 1968, and expands 
significantly several of the NDEA programs. The new legislation further 
undergirds the entire structure of American education and increases oppor- 
tunities for young people to attain the highest level of education of which 
each is capable. 

SUMMARY OF MAJOR PROVISIONS 

The principal changes made by the amendments are: 

. An increase in authorized annual appropriations for student 
loans under Title II from the present level of $135 million 
to $195 million in 1968, expansion of the loan forgiveness 
feature, and an increase in the individual loan ceiling for 
graduate and professional students from $1,000 to $2,500 per 
year; 

. Expansion of the Title III Critical Subject Program to include 
English, reading, history, geography, and civics; 

. Expansion of the Title IV Graduate Fellowship Program to a 
level of 7,500 fellowships by 1967; 

. Expansion of the Title V Guidance, Counseling, and Testing 
program to all elementary grades, public junior colleges and 
technical institutes, with authorized annual appropriations 
increased to $30 million by ±967; 

. Expansion of the Title VI Language Development Program by 
raising the ceiling in authorized annual appropriations from 
the present $8 million to $18 million by 1968; 

. Establishment of a new Title XI, Training Institutes, in- 
corporating the old Title VI -B with authorized appropriations 
of $32 . 75 million for each of fiscal years I965 through 1968. 

Mr. Cohen is the Assistant Secretary (for Legislation) and Mr. Keppel is the Commissioner of Education in the 
U. S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. 

Health, Education, and Welfare Indicators, November 1964 



II - 87 



REMARKS OF PRESIDENT JOHNSON ON SIGNING 
THE NATIONAL DEFENSE EDUCATION ACT AMENDMENTS OF 1964 (P.L. 88-665) 

The 88th Congress is gone but its good works continue. The measure before me is one of the finest 
works of this very fine year. 

For reasons personal, as well as Presidential, I am pleased and I am proud to be able to sign this 
measure into law today. 

In 1958, I was privileged to be one of the authors of the National Defense Education Act which this 
legislation extends and expands .... 

When this original legislation was enacted, I said— and I hope you will pardon me if I repeat it today: 
"History may well record that we saved liberty and saved freedom when we undertook a crash program in the 
field of education." 

"We have not gone far enough fast enough. There must be an awakening not only here in the Congress 
but throughout this great country of ours. And first things must come first." 

Today under your leadership, because of your courage and your counsel, there has been an awakening. 
We face the challenges and the contests of the world with much greater certainty and sureness than we did 
six years ago. Our effort in education is succeeding and is moving forward. More than 3,000 young men and 
women have been trained for college teaching. Five thousand more are already enrolled. Over 600,000 
students have been helped to secure a college education under the NDEA Student Loan Programs. Much 
has been done. 

But as I said in '58 to the Congress, "first things must still come first." 

We are now losing more than 100,000 school graduates of the highest ability who cannot afford to go to 
college . . . this just must not continue. The challenge is obvious and we must meet it. Higher costs must 
not put higher education out of reach. 

The Continental Congress was the first to pledge... "That the means of education shall forever be 
encouraged." Nowit's up to us to keep that pledge in our time. 

That is the purpose of this legislation that I sign today. 




Secretary Celebrezze (left) and other officials observe President Johnson's 
signing the NDEA Amendments of 1964. 



II - 88 



PROGRAMS 



OF THE 



U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE 

PART II 
Food and Drug Administration 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Page 

Mission and Challenge - by the Commissioner 11-91 

Responsibilities 11-92 

Enforcement Program 11-100 

Certification, Inspection, and Other Services Program 11-102 

Civil Defense and Continuity of Government Programs II-IOU 



II - 89 



MISSION AND CHALLENGE 

Food and Drug Administration - George P. Larrick, Commissioner 

The problems facing the Food and Drug Administration affect the general 
health and welfare of all American consumers and are becoming increasing- 
ly complex. Basically, three factors account for these challenges: the 
rapid evolution of (l) the Nation's economy, (2) the Nation's technology, 
and (3) the pattern in which the Nation's population has grown and redis- 
tributed itself. 

The millions of dollars the food, drug, cosmetic, and household chemical 
industries have been spending on research every year have literally re- 
shaped the Nation's supplies of these commodities as well as the way they 
are produced, packaged, and distributed. 

New product development in the regulated industries has brought miracu- 
lous new chemicals for agriculture, strange new additives for processed 
foods, life-saving new drugs, and useful chemical household aids. All 
employ potent substances requiring preventive safeguards to assure that 
consumer benefits to be gained by all of these advances are not accompanied 
by public health hazards. 

To protect consumers, Congress has changed the controls over these prod- 
ucts by legislation calling for revolutionary changes in FDA operations — 
stepped up basic research, new scientific methodology, revised inspectional 
techniques — and greatly increased coverage in all areas. To meet its grow- 
ing responsibilities, the FDA enforcement staff has been increased from 829 
for the fiscal year 1955 to 3,928 for the fiscal year 1961+ . 



II - 91 



Food and Drug Administration 

FDA The Food and Drug Administration administers the Federal Food, 
RESPONSI- Drug, and Cosmetic Act and five related laws — the Tea Importa- 
BILITIES tion Act, the Import Milk Act, the Federal Hazardous Substances 
Labeling Act, the Federal Caustic Poison Act, and the Filled 
Milk Act. In addition, the FDA is assigned important emergency 
civil defense responsibilities under the Federal Civil Defense 
Act and Executive Order 11001. 

SCOPE OF The Food and Drug Administration: 

ACTIVITIES (a) enforces prohibitions against adulteration and mis- 
branding ; 

(b) inspects foods, drugs, therapeutic devices, cosmetics, 
hazardous substances, and caustic poisons in interstate 
commerce and while held for sale after shipment in inter- 
state commerce, and establishments producing or handling 
them; 

(c) inspects lots of these products offered for importa- 
tion; 

(d) develops legal actions in the Federal Courts to remove 
violative products from the market, to restrain their inter- 
state shipment and to punish offenders; 

(e) causes detention, through the Bureau of Customs, of 
illegal articles offered for importation; 

(f) evaluates the safety and efficacy of new drugs before 
they are placed on the market ; 

(g) evaluates the safety of food additives before permitting 
their use in or on foods; 

(h) establishes through public procedures safe tolerances 
for poisonous or deleterious substances (other than pesti- 
cide chemicals used in or on raw agricultural commodities) 
which cannot be avoided under good manufacturing practices; 

(i) establishes reasonable standards of identity, quality, 
and fill-of-container for foods (fresh and dried fruits and 
vegetables exempted) to promote honesty and fair dealing in 
the interest of consumers; 

(j) inspects public eating places to insure that consumers 
are properly notified when they are served oleomargarine; 

(k) conducts investigations to insure that dangerous pre- 
scription drugs are sold to the public only on the authori- 
zation of licensed practitioners; 



II - 92 



(l) evaluates and requires hazardous substances intended 
or suitable for household use to bear suitable warning 
labeling; 

(m) conducts research and methods development necessary to 
support FDA activities; 

(n) and conducts educational and public information activi- 
ties to promote voluntary compliance with the law. 

The Food and Drug Administration in its certification, inspec- 
tion, and other service programs: 

(a) conducts the pretesting and certification of batches 
of antibiotic drugs, insulin, or any derivatives thereof; 

(b) lists color additives which are suitable and safe for 
use in foods, drugs, and cosmetics, and certifies batches 
of certain colors; 

(c) maintains supervisory inspection of seafood (shrimp and 
oyster) packing establishments that voluntarily apply tfdr it; 

(d) and establishes safe tolerances for residues of pesti- 
cide chemicals in or on raw agricultural commodities. 

FDA, in its emergency preparedness programs, develops plans and 
conducts training and other activities to promote a state of 
readiness for inspection of food and drugs under all conditions 
of a national emergency. In all its enforcement activities, the 
Food and Drug Administration cooperates with State and local 
agencies, and pursues a coordinated approach to avoid overlapping 
of efforts and assure consumer protection. 

Digest of Legislation Governing Operations 
of the Food and Drug Administration 

1. Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (June 25, 1938) (21 USC 301-392) 

The basic Federal law prohibits movement in interstate commerce of 
adulterated and misbranded food, drugs, devices, and cosmetics. Its 
passage repealed the original legislation, the Federal Food and Drugs 
Act of June 30, 1906. 

Significant amendments to the Act provided: 

(a) for the registration and periodic inspection of drug 
manufacturers to assure that manufacturing methods are in 
conformity with current good manufacturing practices, 

(b) that new drugs be shown to be effective as well as 
safe, 

(c) for procedures to be followed in the testing of new 
drugs, including patient consent, 

II - 93 



(d) for summary suspension of new drug applications when 
there is an imminent hazard to public health; 

(e) for withdrawal of new drugs when their safety or effec- 
tiveness is no longer assured; 

(f) that manufacturers must keep records and furnish FDA 
reports in connection with safety and effectiveness of new 
drugs and antibiotics; 

(g) for standardization of nonproprietary drug nomenclature; 

(h) for additional labeling and advertising control of pre- 
scription drugs; 

(i) that manufacturers make available to physicians, upon 
written request, all required labeling information for pre- 
scription drugs; 

(j) for certification of insulin and of all antibiotics for 
man and certain antibiotics for animals, except those exempted 
by the Secretary; 

(k) for the pretesting for safety of food additives prior to 
their use in or on foods; 

(l) for the establishment of tolerances and the determination 
of suitability and safety of color additives prior to their 
use; and 

(m) for the establishment of tolerances for pesticide chemi- 
cals on raw agricultural products. 

Other significant amendments defined in detail classes of drugs 
limited to prescription sale, prohibited the use of the prescrip- 
tion legend on other drugs, and further regulated the dispensing of 
prescription drugs; and regulated the marketing of oleomargarine 
and its serving in public eating places. 

2. Tea Importation Act (March 2, 1897 ) (21 USC Ul-50) 

Prohibits the importation of any tea which is inferior in purity, quality, 
and fitness for consumption to standards established under the authority 
of the Act. 

3. The Filled Milk Act (March k, 1923) (21 USC 6l-6k) 

Prohibits the substitution of any fat or oil for milk fat in milk or cream 
with certain exceptions for infant foods. 

k. The Import Milk Act (February 1$, 1927) (21 USC 1UI-IU9) 

Prohibits the importation of milk or cream unless the shipper holds a 
permit from the Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare. 

II - 9h 



5. The Federal Caustic Poison Act (March U, 1927) (15 USC UOl-ltll) 

Regulates the labeling of products containing 12 caustic or corrosive 
substances packaged in household-size containers. It was repealed by 
the Federal Hazardous Substances Labeling Act except that it remains in 
effect with respect to foods, drugs, and cosmetics. 

6. The Federal Hazardous Substances Labeling Act (July 12, i960) 
(15 USC 1261-1273) 

Regulates labeling of hazardous substances in containers intended or 
suitable for household use which may cause personal injury or illness. 

7. The Federal Civil Defense Act of 1950 (January 12, 1951) 
(50 USC APP 2251-22977 

Under Executive Order 11001 (27 F.R. 153*0 assigning emergency prepared- 
ness functions to the Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare, is 
delegated responsibility to prepare national emergency plans and develop 
and direct preparedness programs covering maintenance of purity and 
safety in the manufacture and distribution of food, drugs, and biologi- 
cals. In addition, Executive Order 103^6 (17 F.R. 3^+77) assigns emer- 
gency planning responsibilities for maintaining continuity of essential 
functions concurrently to all Federal departments and agencies. 

FDA OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER— The Office of the Commissioner pro- 
FUNCTI0NAL vides overall planning, coordination, and evaluation of agency 
STATEMENTS operations as well as leadership and service for business manage- 
ment activities. 

NATIONAL ADVISORY FOOD AND DRUG COUNCIL— Consists of citizens 
prominent in science, industry, government, labor, law, and con- 
sumer activities. Advises the Commissioner of Food and Drugs on 
national needs and effectiveness of FDA programs and policies. 

LEGAL SERVICES (From PHEW Office of General Counsel) — The Divi- 
sion of Food and Drugs (0GC) performs legal services in connec- 
tion with the administration of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cos- 
metic Act and related Acts. 

OFFICE OF PUBLIC INFORMATION — Advises the Commissioner on public 
relations, press and related matter involving communications 
with the public. Serves as the focal point for releases of 
information customarily disseminated through the medium of the 
press, television, radio, magazines, and various related publi- 
cations. Under the supervision of the Director of Public Infor- 
mation, FDA, staff members of the Office of Public Information 
maintain contact with media and with organizations and groups 
who carry on information and communication activities related to 
the objectives of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. 

OFFICE OF FEDERAL-STATE RELATIONS — Develops and coordinates a 
program of cooperation between FDA and State and municipal agen- 
cies enforcing laws regulating foods, drugs, cosmetics, and re- 
lated products. 

II - 95 



OFFICE OF EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS— Operates FDA emergency pre- 
paredness and civil defense program. 

ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER FOR PLANNING— Responsible for identifying 
emergent trends and problem areas in the field of food, drugs, 
and cosmetics, and provides for future needs or solutions to 
problems by planning and developing new programs and policies. 

ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER FOR REGULATIONS— Directs and coordinates 
the regulation-making activities of the Food and Drug Adminis- 
tration, to include procedural regulations, interpretative regu- 
lations, exemption regulations, rule-making regulations, and for- 
mal and informal regulatory policy statements. 

ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER FOR ADMINISTRATION— Serves as principal 
adviser to the Commissioner on all phases of management inherent 
in the operations of FDA. 

ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER FOR SCIENCE RESOURCES— Responsible for 
development of programs to strengthen the science resources of 
the FDA. Responsible for developing a science communications 
program; and for broadening FDA's relations with scientific organi- 
zations both in this country and internationally. Responsible 
for the introduction of new and modern research systems and tech- 
niques. Responsible for coordinating research contracts. 

ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER FOR OPERATIONS— Responsible for the over- 
all coordination of FDA day-to-day operations. 

BUREAU OF MEDICINE — Responsible for developing medical policy of 
the Food and Drug Administration with respect to efficacy and 
safety for man and animals of drugs and devices; establishes 
medical policy and advises the Commissioner concerning the health 
effects of toxic substances found in foods, drugs, cosmetics, 
and household substances; responsible for the coordination and 
evaluation of New Drug Applications and claims for Investiga- 
tional Drugs; operates an Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Pro- 
gram; conducts through contracts a program of clinical studies 
of drugs and devices; responsible for medical aspects of FDA's 
inspectional and investigational programs and court cases. 

BUREAU OF EDUCATION AND VOLUNTARY COMPLIANCE— Responsible for 
voluntary compliance and cooperation among the public , the 
regulated industries, and the FDA through educational and infor- 
mational activities. ( 

BUREAU OF REGULATORY COMPLIANCE— Responsible for direction and 
operation of inspection, investigation, sample collection, sur- 
veillance, and analytical programs necessary to enforce the FD&C 
and other Acts, including the operation of district offices and 
laboratories and resident inspection stations. Responsible for 
Federal-State cooperative enforcement programs. 



II - 96 



BUREAU OF SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH— Responsible for the conduct of 
systematic scientific research and studies to support FDA's 
basic mission, including long-range research to solve consumer 
protection problems and to develop better analytical methods 
for use by headquarters and field laboratories. Provides scien- 
tific expertise, advice, and consultation to the Bureau of Medi- 
cine, the Bureau of Scientific Standards and Evaluation, and 
other FDA bureaus in connection with food, drug, and cosmetic 
regulatory matters. Responsible for developing the following 
scientific disciplines: chemistry, pharmacology, pharmaceuti- 
cal chemistry, bacteriology, pathology, microbiology, physics, 
genetics, nutrition, biology, physiology, mathematical statis- 
tics, zoology, dermatology, dietetics, radiology, botany, en- 
tomology, nematology, parasitology, and food, drug, and cosmetic 
manufacturing technology. Operates appropriate laboratories 
and testing facilities. 

BUREAU OF SCIENTIFIC STANDARDS AND EVALUATION— Responsible for 
the scientific evaluation of pesticide, food additive, and color 
additive petitions; for the development of regulations for pesti- 
cide tolerances and exemptions, food additives, color additives, 
food standards, and antibiotic and insulin drugs; for adminis- 
tering certification programs for antibiotics, insulin, and 
color additives; for toxicological evaluation of investigational 
new drug and new drug applications ; for the scientific evalua- 
tion of the labeling of hazardous substances; for planning and 
conducting laboratory investigations to develop scientific facts, 
methods, and bases of evaluation and other studies pertinent to 
the standard making, certification, and evaluation functions. 

FIELD SERVICE — Through personnel located in 18 Food and Drug Dis- 
tricts and k6 Resident Inspection Stations carries out investi- 
gations to discover and prove violations of the Acts administered 
by FDA. Inspects manufacturing plants for conditions which may 
lead to violations. Collects and analyzes samples. Recommends 
the initiation of legal proceedings. Cooperates with State and 
local authorities. Provides information to members of industry 
and consumers. Maintains prescribed liaison with designated HEW 
Regional Offices. 



II - 97 



FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION-STATISTICAL SUMMARY 
ORGANIZATION (as of June 30, 1964) 



Unit 

Office of the Commissioner 

Office of Public Information 
Office of Federal State Relations 
Office of Emergency Preparedness 
Assistant Commissioner for Planning 
Assistant Commissioner for Science Resources 
Assistant Commissioner for Operations 
Assistant Commissioner for Administration 
Assistant Commissioner for Regulations 
Bureau of Regulatory Compliance 
Field District Offices 
Consultants 
Bureau of Medicine 
Bureau of Scientific Research 
Bureau of Scientific Standards & Evaluation 
Bureau of Education & Voluntary Compliance 

Total 



PERSONNEL (as of June 30) FY 1959 



Paid Employment 
In D. C. Area 
Outside D. C. Area 




1,472 
648 
824 

FY 1962 


Paid Employment 
In D. C. Area 
Outside D. C. Area 

FUNDS 




2,584 
1,116 
1,468 

FY 1959 


Enforcement Approp. 
From Other Sources 
Certification Fees 


$10 
1 


,917,000 

221,270 

,281,015 

FY 1962 



Enforcement Approp, 
From Other Sources 
Certification Fees 

Buildings 



$23,000,000 

205,632 

1,737,189 



FY 1960 

1,860 

783 

1,077 

FY 1963 

3,485 
1,503 
1,982 

FY 1960 



FY 1961 

2,248 

979 

1,269 

FY 1964 

3,928 
1,778 
2,150 

FY 1961 



$13,800,000 $18,848,000 

271,081 206,605 

1,711,808 1,505,840 



FY 1963 



FY 1964 



Employees 

16 

9 

18 

8 

22 

7 

3 

306 

15 

141 

2150 

8 

310 

457 

369 

89 

3928 



FY 1965 



$29,064,700 $35,805,000 $39,200,000 (est) 

208,189 201,000 204,000 (est) 

1,889,510 1,587,993 2,337,000 (est) 



$ 1,750,000 $ 



$ 4,466,000 $10,875,000 



II - 98 



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II - 99 



ENFORCEMENT PROGRAM 

PROGRAM To achieve a maximum degree of compliance with the requirements of 
OBJECTIVES the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. Other Acts require FDA: 

To insure that all milk and cream offered for importation into 
the United States is shipped by holders of valid permits, 

To prevent the substitution of any fat or oil for milk fat in 
any milk, cream, or skimmed milk, except distinctly proprietary 
food compounds not readily mistaken in taste for milk or cream 
or for evaporated, condensed, or powdered milk or cream, 

To insure that the label of any hazardous substance bears suit- 
able warnings and instructions in a container intended or suit- 
able for household use, and 

To insure that all tea imported into the United States is not 
inferior in purity, quality, and fitness for consumption as com- 
pared with standards established under the authority of the Act. 

EXTENT OF Regulation of foods, drugs, devices, and cosmetics under the 
PROBLEM Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act is not static, but a con- 
tinuous, expanding, and complex responsibility. 

There are an estimated 500,000 manufacturers, distributors, and 
storers of foods, drugs, therapeutic devices, and cosmetics plus 
an additional 375,000 public eating places and 56,000 drugstores. 
Of the first 500,000 establishments, it is estimated that over 
120,000 substantially affect interstate commerce so that their 
activities must be investigated periodically by establishment 
inspections and product examinations to insure that commodities 
marketed are not adulterated, misbranded, or otherwise in vio- 
lation. 

The 375,000 public eating places are subject to inspection to 
insure that consumers are properly notified when oleomargarine 
is served. The 56,000 drugstores (plus an unknown number of 
other miscellaneous outlets) must be kept under surveillance 
to prevent the "bootlegging" of drugs which are so dangerous 
that they are required by law to be sold only upon prescription. 
The total number of interstate shipments, each of which may con- 
stitute a separate violation of the laws enforced, is not known 
and cannot even be estimated. The annual value at the consumer 
level of all commodities subject to regulation is estimated at 
$117 billion. Estimates are that in excess of 65% of these 
commodities are a major workload responsibility so that for each 
of the approximately 825 Food and Drug Inspectors, there are 
about $100 million worth of commodities subject to regulation. 

Since 1958, FDA has examined for radioactivity over 19,000 samples 
of food products from all parts of the United States and many 
foreign nations. FDA's surveillance program also includes indus- 
trial and accidental radiological contamination. 



II - 100 



The Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act provides that new drugs 
must be proven safe and effective before they can be marketed. 
Approximately 16,750 applications for the marketing of new drugs 
have been processed since 1938. 

FDA received l,l8U food additives petitions for direct and in- 
direct additives since September 6, 1958, the date of enactment. 
Seven hundred forty-four of these were filed, and 6oU regulations 
were issued. 

All tea consumed in the United States is imported; standards have 
to be kept up-to-date. The main ports of entry are New York, 
San Francisco, and Boston. 

There are over 2,600 manufacturers, repackers, or relabelers of 
hazardous substances subject to regulation. 

The enforcement program under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cos- 
metic Act is limited in scope, and based upon a priority selec- 
tion according to the seriousness of probable violations in the 
following order: 

(1) Violations that endanger public health. 

(2) Violations having a hygienic or esthetic significance; e.g., 
filthy or decomposed foods , or foods produced under insanitary 
conditions. 

(3) Violations involving economic fraud or cheat. 

FDA conducts planned and controlled inspections of factories , 
storage warehouses, carriers, and (in some phases of the work) 
retail establishments , and field and laboratory examinations of 
interstate and import shipments. The level of factory inspections, 
sample collections, and legal actions is indicated in the statis- 
tical summary sheet. 

In the promulgation of regulations, the FDA receives assistance 
from the General Counsel's Office of the Department. 

Preventive measures and education are an important part of the 
FDA enforcement program. These activities are designed: (a) 
to obtain voluntary compliance by the regulated industries; (b) 
to reach a higher standard of public health and safety through 
consumer understanding of the laws administered by FDA; (c) to 
enlist the cooperation and assistance of scientific groups (uni- 
versities, foundations, pharmaceutical manufacturers, profes- 
sional societies, etc.) in establishing standards of potency, 
labeling, etc.; and (d) to assist State and local enforcement 
officials by providing: scientific, technical and legal infor- 
mation, training, and close day-to-day contact on current issues. 



II - 101 



LEGAL The Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, as amended (21 USC 
BASIS 301-392); the Tea Importation Act, as amended (21 USC 1*1-50); 
the Import Milk Act (21 USC lUl-lU9); the Federal Hazardous 
Substances Labeling Act (15 USC 1261-1273); the Federal Caustic 
Poison Act (15 USC 1+01-ltll); and the Filled Milk Act, as amended 
(21 USC 6l-6k) . The Kefauver-Harris Amendments to the FD&C Act, 
of October 10,1962 (P.L. 87-781), provide additional legal re- 
quirements to assure that drugs are safe and effective. 



SOURCE 
OF FUNDS 



Annual Congressional appropriations. 



ADVISORY Board of Tea Examiners, Food Standards Committee, and Public 
GROUPS Service Advisory Committee. 

CERTIFICATION, INSPECTION, AND OTHER SERVICES PROGRAM 

PROGRAM To assure by adequate pretesting and certification the safety 
OBJECTIVES and efficacy of antibiotic drugs , the safety and potency of 
insulin, and the safety of color additives for use in foods, 
drugs, and cosmetics; to provide supervisory inspection to sea- 
food (shrimp and oyster) packers who voluntarily request it; 
and to establish safe tolerances with respect to residues of 
pesticide chemicals in or on raw agricultural commodities. 

EXTENT OF The Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act requires the pretesting 
PROBLEM and certification of all batches of antibiotic drugs and insulin, 
or any derivatives thereof; the listing and batch for use in 
foods, drug, and cosmetics; the continuous inspection of seafood 
(shrimp and oyster) packing establishments upon the voluntary 
application of seafood packers; the establishment of tolerances 
with respect to residues of pesticide chemicals in or on raw 
agricultural products. 

PRESENT (l) Antibiotics Certification Services . Chemical tests and bio- 
PROGRAM logical assays are made of samples submitted by the manufacturers. 
SCOPE When established that the samples of a batch meet all standards 

of safety and efficacy, a certificate is issued and the batch may 

be marketed. 

(2) Insulin Certification Services . Examinations are made of 
samples of batches of drugs composed wholly or partly of insulin, 
or its derivatives, by chemical, biological, and bacteriological 
tests and assays to determine their strength, quality, and purity, 
Certificates are issued for those batches meeting the standards. 

(3) Color Additives Certification Services . Certification of 
color additives consists of chemical and physical tests to 
establish that they are safe and suitable for use. 

(k) Pesticides Tolerances Services . The Pesticide Chemicals 
Amendment is applicable to economic poisons used in the produc- 
tion, storage, or transportation of raw agricultural commodities 
to promote an abundant food supply. 



II - 102 



To protect the public health, the amendment provides a procedure 
for deciding maximum levels of residues of pesticide chemicals 
that may remain on raw agricultural commodities. 

(5) Seafood Inspection Services . Continuous supervisory inspec- 
tion is provided to packers of seafood (shrimp and oysters) upon 
voluntary application of packers. 

For each of the above services the Federal Food, Drug, and Cos- 
metic Act provides that fees shall be charged as are necessary 
to provide, equip, and maintain an adequate service. 

LEGAL Sections U06, 1+08, 506, 507, 702a., and 706 of the Federal Food, 
BASIS Drug, and Cosmetic Act, as amended (21 USC 3 1 46,3 1 +6a., 356, 357, 
372a., and 376). The Kefauver-Harris Amendments to the FD&C 
Act of October 12, 1962 (P.L. 87-781), require that all antibiotic 
drugs intended for administration to humans be certified by FDA 
to assure they are safe and effective before they are released 
for sale. The Amendments added 30 groups of antibiotic drugs 
to the 5 groups already certifiable. 

SOURCE Fees for services. The aggregate of the advance deposits during 
OF FUNDS the current fiscal year to cover payments of fees for services 

in connection with such certification, inspection, or establish- 
ment of tolerances, remain available until expended; advance 
deposits for which no services are rendered are refunded. 

ADVISORY Ad hoc committees selected by the National Academy of Sciences 
GROUPS with respect to residues of pesticide chemicals in or on raw 
agricultural commodities : Aldrin-Dieldrin Committee and Com- 
mittee on Chlordane Residue Tolerance. 



II - 103 



CIVIL DEFENSE AND CONTINUITY OF GOVERNMENT 

EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS PROGRAMS 

PROGRAM To prepare the Nation to meet the problems bearing upon the 
OBJECTIVES safety of food and drugs in a national emergency by: (l) pre- 
paring national emergency plans and developing and directing 
programs covering maintenance of purity and safety in the manu- 
facture and distribution of food, drugs, and biologicals; (2) 
training of Federal, State, and local food and drug officials 
and food and drug industry officials concerning the effects 
of chemical and biological warfare agents and nuclear weapons 
on food and drugs to enable them to take pre- and post-attack 
action sufficient to assure safety on an emergency basis; (3) 
achieving a state of operational readiness for maintaining con- 
tinuity of FDA essential functions; and (k) conducting scien- 
tific research to determine the vulnerability of food and drugs 
to contamination by biological and chemical warfare agents in 
the event of overt or covert attack and to develop practical 
procedures for the decontamination or salvage of contaminated 
food, drugs, and biologicals. 

EXTENT OF In a National emergency, stocks of food and drugs may be rendered 
PROBLEM unsafe through radiological, biological and chemical warfare 

weapons effects. Federal, State, and local food and drug offi- 
cials and food and drug industry officials must be aware of and 
be prepared to carry out their emergency responsibilities. FDA 
must take measures to assure the continuation of its essential 
functions in event of an enemy attack. 

PRESENT Developing National plans covering the responsibilities of Fed- 
PROGRAM eral, State, and local food and drug officials and food and drug 
SCOPE industry officials to ensure safe food, drugs, and biologicals 
in an emergency. This includes the development of an overall 
National plan and FDA emergency plans to assure continuation of 
its essential functions in event of an enemy attack. 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



A modest training program, limited by available allocated funds, 
continues to be an important asset in developing an operational 
readiness to assure a safe food and drug supply in a National 
emergency. Based upon available data, there are about 5.7 Fed- 
eral, State, and local food and drug officials per 100,000 popu- 
lation. Since I960, FDA has been able to train only 3.2 offi- 
cials for each 100,000 population. 

The Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, as amended (21 USC 301- 
392); Federal Civil Defense Act of 1950, as amended (Public Law 
920, 8lst Congress); Reorganization Plan No. 1 of 1958 (72 Stat. 
1799); Executive Order 103U6 of April 17, 1952, as amended; Exec- 
utive Order 11001 of February 16, 1962. 



SOURCE OF Allocation of funds made available to the Department from Con- 
FUNDS gressional appropriations to the Office of Emergency Planning. 



II - 10U 



PROGRAMS 
OF THE 

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. EDUCATION. AND "WELFARE 

PART II 
Public Health Service 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Page 
Statement by the Surgeon General 11-107 

Public Health Service 11-109 

Digest of Legislation 11-11 it- 
Office of the Surgeon General 11-11 8 

Division of Health Mobilization 11-11 8 

National Center for Health Statistics 11-120 

National Library of Medicine . 11-130 

Bureau of Medical Services 11-132 

Division of Foreign Quarantine 11-13^ 

Division of Hospitals and Medical Care 11-136 

Division of Indian Health ...» H-138 

Freedmen's Hospital 11-140 

Bureau of State Services — Community Health 11-1^2 

Division of Accident Prevention xi^kk 

Division of Chronic Diseases 11-146 

Communicable Disease Center II-148 

Division of Community Health Services II-I50 

Division of Dental Public Health and Resources „ .11-152 

Division of Hospital and Medical Facilities II-1 54 

Division of Nursing II-160 

Bureau of State Services — Environmental Health ........ °xi-'\62 

Division of Air Pollution 11-164 

Arctic Health Research Center II-166 

Division of Environmental Engineering and Food Protection .H-168 

Environmental Health Sciences . „ II-1 70 

Division of Occupational Health 11-172 

Division of Radiological Health , H-174 

Division of Water Supply and Pollution Control H-1 76 



II -105 



Page 

National Institutes of Health 11-178 

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases . . . .11-1 80 
National Institute of Arthritis and Metabolic Diseases . . . .11-182 

National Cancer Jnstitute . «, II-184 

National Institute of Child Health and Human Development . . .11-186 

National Institute of Dental Research 11-188 

National Institute of General Medical Sciences 11-190 

National Heart Institute .... .11-1 92 

National Institute of Mental Health 11-194 

National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Blindness . .11-196 

Clinical Center II-I98 

Division of Biologies Standards „ 11-200 

Division of Research Grants ... .11-202 

Division of Research Facilities and Resources 11-204 



11-106 



Statement by Dr. Luther L. Terry- 
Surgeon General, Public Health Service 

During the past year, the Public Health Service expanded a number of 
its activities as it continued to respond to the increasing complexity of 
health problems and social changes . 

New legislation enacted during the year gave the Service significant 
new responsibilities in maintaining the Nation's health and improving health 
resources . 

The Health Professions Educational Assistance Act of 1963 authorized 
the Seryice to make grants to help build schools of medicine, dentistry, and 
other health professions, and to administer a program of loans for students at 
these schools. Planning was begun during the year to implement this new 
legislation by the start of the 196^-65 academic year. 

The passage of the Mental Retardation Facilities and Community Mental 
Health Centers Construction Act of 1963 launched a major new attack on the 
problems of mental illness and mental retardation. This bill provides for 
expanded research to determine the causes of retardation, establishes diag- 
nostic treatment clinics, and permits the construction of community centers 
for the care of the retarded and the mentally ill. Emphasis will be placed on 
health services at the community level rather than in huge custodial insti- 
tutions . The research provisions of this measure are being administered by 
the new National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, while the 
construction of mental retardation facilities and comprehensive mental health 
centers is the responsibility of the Division of Hospital and Medical Facili- 
ties. A new Mental Retardation Branch was also established in the Division of 
Chronic Diseases to work with the States and communities in establishing 
effective control programs . 

The Clean Air Act of 1963 enabled the Federal Government to expand and 
increase its activities to control air pollution. The Act authorized the 
Public Health Service to make grants to State and local governments for air 
pollution abatement programs. It also authorized accelerated research, tech- 
nical assistance, and information programs on air pollution. And it gave the 
Federal Government limited enforcement powers in this field. 

The Public Health Service remains the largest supporter of health 
research in the Nation. Two of the nine National Institutes of Health com- 
pleted their first full year of work. The National Institute of Child Health 
and Human Development concentrated its research efforts on the total process 
of human development — from before conception through the prenatal period, 
infancy, childhood, adolescence, maturity, and old age. The National 
Institute of General Medical Sciences provided research and training in the 
sciences basic to medicine, biology, and public health. Advances in the study 
of leukemia and viral causes of cancer, the artificial replacement of human 
organs, and the laboratory synthesis of insulin were among the highlights of 
research accomplishments by the National Institutes of Health and its grantees 
in the past year. 



11-107 



The community health programs of the Public Health Service continued 
to work with State and local agencies to improve public health practice and 
to expand community health services . Under the Community Health Services and 
Facilities Act of 196l, the Service was supporting 136 projects designed to 
test and demonstrate improved out-of -hospital health services, particularly 
for the chronically ill and the aged. The Service is also supporting, under 
the Vaccination Assistance Act of 1962, 6l projects in 34 States to vaccinate 
children against diphtheria, whooping cough, tetanus, and polio. 

Aedes aegypti eradication projects, in cooperation with the Pan 
American Health Organization, were initiated as part of a hemisphere -wide 
effort to eradicate the source of yellow fever. In its first full year, the 
Migrant Health program funded 54 projects in 26 States, to provide family 
health services to migrant agricultural workers . A unit in the Bureau of 
State Services was formed to develop and propose a program of alcoholism 
activities for the Public Health Service. 

Environmental health programs expanded their activities against the 
hazards of air and water pollution. Public Health Service scientists identi- 
fied endrin, a pesticide, as the cause of the large-scale fish kills in the 
lower Mississippi in the fall and winter of 1963-64. Municipalities spent 
$424.2 million to build 1,012 new and urgently needed sewage treatment pro- 
jects during the year. Of this, funds allocated by the Public Health Service 
amounted to $l49.2 million. Two new laboratories were established—in 
Alabama and Rhode Island—to study shellfish sanitation measures. 

The communications link between the scientist and the practitioner was 
strengthened by the establishment of the MEDLARS computer system at the 
National Library of Medicine. This system, combined with an extremely high- 
speed printing apparatus, is designed to permit the rapid storage, retrieval, 
and dissemination of scientific information. 

In January of 1964, an Advisory Committee to the Surgeon General on 
Smoking and Health concluded that "cigarette smoking is a health hazard of 
sufficient importance in the United States to warrant appropriate remedial 
action." The Public Health Service is developing a wide program of research 
and education in response to the Committee report. Research on the pro- 
perties of cigarette smoke and its effect on living tissues is now in pro- 
gress, and grants have been made to support studies related to public infor- 
mation and education on the hazards of smoking. A National Clearinghouse on 
Smoking and Health has been established in the Division of Chronic Diseases, 
and a National Interagency Council on Smoking and Health has been formed by a 
number of national health and education agencies to develop plans and programs 
to combat smoking. 

Through these activities, and many others, the Public Health Service 
meets its responsibilities as the Federal agency charged with the protection 
of the Nation's health. 



11-108 



The Public Health Service 



SERVICE The Public Health Service, under the direction of the Surgeon 
RESPONSI- General, is the Federal agency specifically charged with responsi- 
BILITIES bilities for protecting and improving the health of the people 
of the Nation. It collaborates with other Federal agencies and 
with international organizations in world health activities. 

The major functions of the Service are: to conduct and support 
research in the medical, environmental, and related sciences and 
in health status, needs, and the resources and requirements for 
meeting those needs; to provide medical and hospital services to 
persons authorized to receive care from the Service; to prevent 
the introduction and spread of disease; to aid in the development 
of health facilities and services throughout the Nation; to give 
increased emphasis to more effective communication of scientific 
knowledge for the prevention and control of disease; to further 
the application of knowledge for treating chronic disease and 
related health problems of the aged; and to promote the maintenance 
of a healthful environment. 

SCOPE OF Research activities are associated with all areas of Public Health 
ACTIVITIES Service responsibility. They include intramural research; 
cooperative research with public or private institutions, 
organizations, and individuals; and research grants to or 
contracts with such agencies and individuals. Further support 
for research is provided through grants for the construction of 
research facilities, research fellowship and training grants and 
by the work of the National Library of Medicine. Closely related 
to fundamental laboratory and clinical research activities is the 
licensing of establishments for the production of biological 
products. Other activities involving research and related study 
include the collection, interpretation, and publication of 
statistical and other factual material concerning the health 
status and health requirements of the Nation. 

Direct medical care is provided to merchant seamen, Indians, and 
other beneficiaries designated by act of Congress. For this 
purpose a system of hospitals, outpatient clinics, offices, and 
related facilities is maintained. The hospitals also serve as 
the principal resource for the education of physicians, nurses, 
dentists, pharmacists, and other health personnel employed 
throughout the Public Health Service. The Service assists in the 
establishment of sanitation facilities for Indian communities. 
It also provides personnel to administer medical care programs 
for certain other Federal agencies. 



11-109 



Included within the activities to prevent the introduction and 
spread of disease are the quarantine inspections of persons and 
conveyances from foreign countries and of airports, piers, and 
certain imports; assistance to States and municipalities in the 
prevention and control of diseases which may be transmitted 
through foods served to the public and also in the control of 
communicable diseases in epidemic and disaster situations. The 
Service administers a program to prepare the Nation to meet 
civilian health needs in the event of national disaster. 

To further the development of State and community health facilities 
and services, the Service administers programs of grants for 
several purposes: to enable States and communities to maintain 
comprehensive public health services at adequate levels, to 
establish improved services, and to cope with urgent national 
•health problems; for the construction of hospital, nursing home, 
and other health facilities, centers for research on mental 
retardation and related aspects of huiaan development, and teaching 
facilities; to support studies and experiments designed to develop 
methods for improving out-of -hospital health care services; and 
for the training of professional personnel in certain public 
health specialties. The Service also provides consultation and 
technical assistance to States and communities in disease control, 
the prevention of disability, and the organization and adminis- 
tration of health services. 

Through its environmental health programs, the Service provides 
leadership in recognizing and identifying environmental hazards 
and in developing control and prevention methods and practices 
necessary for the protection of the nation from chemical, 
physical and biological contamination. These programs carry on 
direct operations and provide financial assistance to State and 
local agencies, universities and other non-profit organizations 
and individuals in the public health field. Direct operations 
include research on the origin, nature, control and prevention of 
environmental hazards; national surveillance networks to determine 
trends in these hazards; technical assistance to, and consultation 
with organizations concerned with environmental problems; training 
courses and other dissemination of technical and non-technical 
information. Financial assistance is provided through grants for 
research, training, program development, and demonstration projects 
in environmental health and construction of waste treatment 
facilities. 



II - 110 



ORGANIZA- Officers of the Public Health Service Commissioned Corps and Civil 
TION Service employees, together representing some 350 occupations, 
OF THE perform the work of the Service under the direction of a Surgeon 
SERVICE General. The President appoints an officer of the Cominissioned 
Corps to a 4— year term as Surgeon General. 

Service activities are administered by the Surgeon General through 
four Bureaus: The Bureau of Medical Services, The Bureau of State 
Services (Community Health and Environmental Health), The National 
Institutes of Health, and the Office of the Surgeon General. By 
law, the National Library of Medicine operates in the Public 
Health Service, but not within the Bureau structure. The fact 
sheets that follow describe the operating responsibilities of the 
Bureaus and the programs they administer. 

Trie Public Health Service Regional Organization provides liaison 
between the Bureaus and the States in the nine regions of the 
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. Public Health 
Service regional staff perform specific functions in the areas 
of community health services, environmental health services, 
health mobilization, health statistics, and mental health 
services. This staff for a region includes a Regional Health 
Director, an Associate Regional Health Director for Community 
Health Services, and an Associate Regional Health Director 
for Environmental Health. 

By Congressional authority, public advisory groups, whose 
members are highly qualified persons from throughout the country, 
advise the Surgeon General in certain subject areas. 



II - 111 



PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE— Statistical Summary 
ORGANIZATION (June 30, 196*0 



Unit 




Employees 


Ui 


lit 


Employees 


Office of the Surgeon General 


1,339 


National 


Institutes 




Bureau of Medical Services 




13,511 


of Health 


11,217 








National 


Library of 




Bureau of State Services 




8,686 


Medicine 


259 


Community health 




4,857 








Environmental health 




3,829 


1 


Cotal 


35,012 


PERSONNEL (as of June 30) 




L961 


1962 


1963 


1964 


Paid employment 


28 


,909 


31,746 


33,804 


35,012 


In D. C. area 


11 


,515 


12,965 


13,913 


14,605 


Outside D. C. area 


17 


,39^ 


18,781 


19,891 


20,407 



FUNDS (fiscal year) 



(in thousands) 
1961 1962 



1963 



1964 



1965 



Total available 
Appropriations 
Other funds 



Funds available 



$1,061,391 $1,362,086 $1,809,979 $1,738,461 $1,986,586 

1,040,154 1,339,321 1,568,787 1,701,353 1,960,956 

21,237 22,765 241,192 37,108 25,630 



for: 










Direct operations 285,489 


378,506 


387,093 


460,283 


477,475 


Direct construc- 










tion 26,023 


30,569 


47,928 


22,508 


31,978 


Grants 749,879 


953,010 


1,374,958 


1,255,670 


1,477,133 



II - 113 



Digest of Legislation 

Governing Operations of the 

Public Health Service 

Public Health Service Act , as amended (4-2 U.S.C. 201-232, 24-1-295; amendments 
are cited in program descriptions under "Legal Basis.") 

The Public Health Service Act, approved July 1, 1944 (P.L. 410, 78th 
Cong,), represented a general consolidation and revision of laws relating 
to the Service; frequently amended since that time, its seven present titles 
comprise the following: I — Short Title and Definitions; II — Administration; 
III — General Powers and Duties of Public Health Service; IV — National 
Research Institutes; V — Miscellaneous; VI — Construction of Hospitals; 
VII — Health Research and Training Facilities and Training of Professional 
Health Personnel. 

Federal Water Pollution Control Act (33 U.S.C. 4.66-466k) 

This Act, enacted as part of the Water Pollution Control Act Amendments 
of 1956 (P.L. 660, 84th Cong.), supplants the Water Pollution Control Act 
enacted in 194-8 (P.L. 845, 80th Cong.). It includes provisions for 
comprehensive programs for water pollution control; interstate cooperation; 
research, investigation, training; grants for water pollution control programs; 
grants for construction of treatment works; Advisory Board; enforcement measures 
against pollution of interstate waters, etc. The 196I amendments (P.L. 87-88) 
to the Act vested all functions under the Act in the Secretary and, among other 
things expanded the enforcement authority, increased the maximum grants for 
construction of treatment works, and authorized the establishment of field 
laboratory and research facilities. 

Clean Air Act (Code citation not yet available) 77 Stat. 392 et seq. 

The Clean Air Act (P.L. 88-206), enacted December 17, 19 63, replaces 
the Act of July 14, 1955, as amended, and provides the foundation for the 
development of a comprehensive national program for the prevention and 
control of air pollution. The Act (l) authorizes an expanded national 
program of research and development in air pollution control; (2) authorizes 
grants-in-aid to assist local, State and regional air pollution control 
agencies to initiate, expand or improve their programs; (3) authorizes the 
Secretary to take action to secure abatement of specific air pollution 
problems that are endangering the public health and welfare; (4) and 
authorizes the establishment of an Automotive Vehicle and Fuel Pollution 
Advisory Committee. 

Indian Health— Transfer of Functions and Facilities (4-2 U.S.C. 2001-2004.) 

The Act of August 5, 1954 (P.L. 563, 83rd Cong.), effective July 1, 
1955, transferred to the Surgeon General — for administration under the • 
direction of the Secretary — all functions, responsibilities, and authority 
of the Department of the Interior relating to the conservation of the health 
of Indians; it also provided for the transfer and administration of health 
facilities. 



II - 114 



Construction of Hospitals Serving Indians and Non-Indians (42 U.S.C. 2005-2005f) 

The Act of August 16, 1957 (P.L. 85-151) authorizes the use, under 
prescribed conditions, of appropriations for the construction of Indian 
health facilities, to pay part of the cost of construction of community 
health facilities serving both Indians and non-Indians. 

Indian Health — Provision of Sanitation Facilities (42 U.S.C. 2004a) 

The Act of July 31, 1959 (P.L. 86-121) amends the Act of August 5, 1954 
(P.L. 568, 33rd Cong.), and authorizes the Surgeon General: to construct, 
improve, extend, or otherwise provide and maintain essential sanitation 
facilities for Indians; to arrange for participation with tribal groups, 
local authorities, and other public and nonprofit agencies, in the construction 
costs and in subsequent operation and maintenance of facilities; and to 
transfer completed facilities to State or local authorities and Indian 
tribes, or in the case of domestic facilities, to individual Indians. 

Major Legislative Changes — 1st Session, 88th Congress (1963) 

Training of Physicians and Other Professional Health Personnel 

The Health Professions Educational Assistance Act (P.L. 88-129), 
enacted September 24, 1963, amends Title VII of the Public Health Service 
Act to authorize a three year program of matching grants for constructing 
teaching facilities for training physicians, dentists, pharmacists, 
optometrists, nurses (limited to collegiate schools of nursing), osteopaths, 
podiatrists and professional public health personnel. The Act also 
authorizes a three year program of loans to students of medicine, dentistry, 
and osteopathy. 

Construction of Facilities for the Mentally Retarded and Mentally 111 

The Mental Retardation Facilities and Community Mental Health Centers 
Construction Act (P.L. 8S-I64) , enacted October 31, I963 amends Title VII of 
the Public Health Service Act to authorize project grants for the construction 
of facilities for research on mental retardation and vests authority in the 
Secretary for programs for the construction of (l) public and other nonprofit 
facilities for the mentally retarded, (2) university-affiliated facilities 
for the mentally retarded, and (3) community mental health centers. The Act 
also extends and strengthens existing programs for training teachers of 
mentally retarded and deaf children and expands those programs to include 
teachers of other handicapped children. 

Control of Air Pollution 

Trie changes made by the Clean Air Act (P.L. 88-206), enacted 
December 17, 1963, are described above. 



II - 115 



Other Legislation 

There are numerous statutes which have some provisions .applicable to 
the Service, but which fall primarily within other legislative areas. 
Examples are the legislation for employee health services (5 U.S.C. 150 ) 
and the provision for medical examination of aliens in the Immigration 
and Nationality Act of 1952 (8 U.S.C. 1224); legislation relating to the 
uniformed services but having reference also to officers in the Commissioned 
Corps of the Service. 

Frequently additional temporary or permanent authority for various 
programs is derived from the language of current appropriation acts. Also, 
working agreements whereby work is often performed for other departments, 
pursuant to Section 601 of the Economy Act (31 U.S.C. 686) or pursuant to 
other such statutes, may enlarge the activities of a division or program. 

Major Legislative Changes, 2nd Session, 88th Congress (1964) 



Construction of Nursing Schools; Training of Professional Nurses 

The Nurse Training Act of 1964 (P.L. 88-581), approved September 4, 
1964, adds a new Title VIII to the Public Health Service Act which 
(l) authorizes a 4-year program of construction grants for teaching 
facilities to expand and improve the training capacity of nursing 
schools; (2) authorizes a 5-year program of project grants to assist 
diploma, collegiate and associate degree schools of nursing to meet 
the additional costs of strengthening, improving and expanding their 
training programs; (3) authorizes a 5-year program of formula grants 
to diploma schools of nursing for partial reimbursement of costs of 
training students of nursing whose attendance may reasonably be attrib- 
utable to this legislation; (4) continues for 5 more years and 
expands the existing program of traineeships for advanced training 
of professional nurses; and (5) establishes a student loan program 
for students at collegiate, associate degree and diploma schools 
of nursing. 



Construction and Modernization of Hospitals and Other Medical Fac il ities 

The Hospital and Medical Facilities Amendments of 1964, (P.L. 88-443) 
approved August 18, 1964, extend for 5 years and significantly revise 
Title VI of the Public Health Service Act, popularly known as the 
Hill -Burton hospital construction program. The Amendments provide 
for: (l) a new grant program to assist in areawide planning of health 
facilities; (2) continuation of the existing grant program for 
construction of hospitals and other medical facilities; (3) a new 
grant program for modernization of hospitals and medical facilities; 
(4) continuation of the long-term, low interest loan program for 
hospital construction, with the addition of modernization projects 
to the program; and (5) studies and demonstrations relating to effec- 



II - 116 



tive development and uses of hospital facilities, services and resources. 
For the first time, states are authorized to use part of their allot- 
ments for administration of their construction programs . 



Training of Professional Public Health Personn el 

The Graduate Public Health Training Amendments of 196k, (P.L. 88-497) 
approved August 27 , 196k, amend section 306 of the Public Health Service 
Act to extend for 5 additional years the existing programs of trainee- 
ships for graduate or specialized training in public health for 
professional health personnel. The Amendments also extend for k 
additional years the authority provided by section 309 to make project 
grants to strengthen or expand the graduate or specialized public 
health training programs of schools of public health, nursing and 
engineering. The project authority is also broadened to make grants 
available to other public or nonprofit private institutions providing 
such training. 



II - 117 



Division of Health Mobilization 



PROGRAM To prepare the nation to meet the health needs of the civilian 
OBJECTIVES population in the event of a national disaster by: (1) Mini- 
mizing effects of disaster through emergency medical care meas- 
ures and preventive health services; (2) maintenance of health 
in the surviving population; (3) restoring essential community 
health services. 

EXTENT OF Problems which might confront a community after a disaster are: 
PROBLEM a marked disparity between the health and medical resources and 
the needs for these resources; radiation fallout which causes 
illness and prohibits immediate rescue and care of casualties; 
loss of essential health services and facilities; contamina- 
tion of water and destruction of water and sewage systems; in- 
crease in disease vectors; lack of shelter, food, clothing, 
fuel, and communications; and psychological reactions. 

PRESENT Program activities consist of: preparing the civilian popula- 
PROGRAM tion to meet its health needs when professional medical services 
SCOPE are unavailable, assisting States and communities in organizing 
health personnel and resources so that emergency health surviv- 
al plans can be implemented effectively, planning a coordinated 
emergency program for Federal agencies having health or health- 
related responsibilities, and instituting emergency health plans 
in Federal agencies. 

Provision of increased community medical capability through the 
pre-positioning of substantially greater quantities of expend- 
able medical supplies with each 200-bed civil defense emergency 
hospital; greater emphasis is being placed on natural manage- 
ment and requirements. 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



SOURCE 
OF FUNDS 



ADVISORY 
GROUPS 



Federal Civil Defense Act of 1950 as amended (P.L. 920, 81st 
Congress), particularly sections 405 and 408; Reorganization 
Plan No. 1 of 1958 (23 FR 4991); E.O. 10773, 7/1/58 (23 FR 
5061) as amended by E.O. 10782, 9/6/58; P.L. 87-141, 8/17/61; 
E.O. 10902, 1/9/61; Emergency Preparedness Order No. 4, 1/10/61; 
E.O. 10952, 7/20/61; E.O. 10958, 8/14/61; E.O. 11001, 2/20/62. 

1964 Independent Offices Appropriation Act (P.L. 88-215) - 
DHEW-PHS-Emergency Health Activities - to remain available un- 
til expended. 

American Medical Association Committee on Disaster Medical Care; 
Special Committee on Disaster Medical Services and Health Mobi- 
lization of the Association of American State and Territorial 
Health Officers; Surgeon General's Professional Advisory Com- 
mittee for Emergency Health Preparedness; Public Health Service 
Professional Advisory Committee for Health Mobilization; State 
and Territorial Civil Defense Directors; and committees of 
other professional organizations with health or health-related 
responsibilities. 



II - 118 



Division of Health Mobilization 

DIVISION CHIEF: Mr. Arnold H. Dodge, Acting 

ORGANIZATION (June 30, 1964) 

Unit 

Stockpile Management 

Regional and State Assignments 

Training 

Program Planning and Technical Services 

TOTAL 



Statistical Summary 



Employees 

43 
65 
32 
42 

182 



PERSONNEL (as of June 30) 


1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 




Paid employment 




116 


104 


139 


181 


182 




In D. C. area 




65 


66 


110 


103 


106 




Outside D. C. area 




51 


38 


29 


78 


76 




FUNDS (fiscal year) 




1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 


1965 (Est.) 








(in thousands) 








Total available 


$ 


1.003 


2.629 


37.087 


8.422 


28.872 


10.397 


Appropriations 








35,433 


7,000 


27,510 


8,875 


Other funds 


$ 


1,003 


2,629 


1,654 


1,422 


1,362 


1,522 


Funds available for: 
















Direct operations 


$ 


1,003 


2,629 


37,087 


8,422 


28,872 


10,397 



II - 119 



National Center for Health Statistics 

CENTER The National Center for Health Statistics brings together the 
RESPONSI- major components of Public Health Service competence in the 
BILITY measurement of health status of the Nation and the identifi- 
cation of significant associations between characteristics of 
the population and health related problems. 

SCOPE OF The National Center for Health Statistics is the Federal 
ACTIVITIES government's general-purpose statistical organization for the 
collection, compilation and dissemination of vital and health 
statistics to serve the needs of all segments of the health 
and related professions. The Center stimulates optimal use 
of technical and methodological innovations in collecting, 
processing and analyzing demographic and health statistics 
and provides a source for technical assistance in these areas. 
It carries out a program of extramural activities, both 
national and international, which includes technical assistance 
to the States and programs of research in foreign countries 
under the Special International Research Program. Through the 
Office of Health Statistics Analysis, the Center utilizes vital 
and health statistics to assess the health status of the public, 
develops measures and indexes of health, studies problem and 
disease classification, and acts as secretariat for the U. S. 
National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics. 

CENTER The Center is organized as follows: Office of the Director; 

PROGRAMS Office of Health Statistics Analysis; Division of Data 

Processing; Division of Vital Statistics; Division of Health 
Interview Statistics; Division of Health Examination 
Statistics, and Division of Health Records Statistics. The 
Division of Data Processing provides data preparation and 
computer processing services to the entire Center and provides 
consultation and technical assistance to other public health 
programs and to the States. The four substantive divisions 
are described in detail on the following pages. 

LEGAL PHS Act, as amended, particularly Sec. 301, 305, 312(a), 313, 
BASIS 3lMc), and 315 (1*2 USC, 2Ul, 2l+2c, 2W»a, 2U5, 2h6c, 2**7). 



SOURCE 
OF FUNDS 



Appropriation - National Health Statistics, PHS. 



ADVISORY U. S. National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics; 
GROUPS Surgeon General's Advisory Committee on the National Health 
Survey . 



11-120 



National Center for Health Statistics — Statistical Summary 
DIRECTOR OF PROGRAM : Forrest E. Linder, Ph. D. 
ORGANIZATION OF PROGRAM (June 30, 1964) 



Unit 

Office of the Director 1/ 

Office of Health Statistics Analysis 

Division of Health Interview Statistics 

Division of Health Examination Statistics 

Division of Health Records Statistics 

Division of Vital Statistics 

Division of Data Processing 



Total 



PERSONNEL (as of June 30) 

Paid Employment 
In D. C. area 
Outside D. C. area 



1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 



315 

293 

22 



326 363 

301 344 

25 19 



384 

354 

30 



Employees 


92 


11 


23 


57 


30 


45 


126 



FUNDS (fiscal year) 



Total available 
Appropriations 
Other funds 



_1960 1961 1J>6_2 1_963 

(in thousands) 



1964 



384 



$ 4,274 $ 4,666 $ 5,529 $ 6,361 

4,028 4,495 5,149 5,963 

246 171 380 398 



1965 



$ 6,510 

6,152 

358 



59 




97 


138 


-- 




-- 


166 


22 




90 


99 


111 




216 


496 


2,186 


2 


,428 


2,769 


1,896 


1 


,835 


1,861 



Total funds by organizational unit 
Prior to September 1963 reorganization 

Office of the Director 

Publications Staff 

Office of Health Statistics 

Analysis 
Office of Electronic Systems 
National Health Survey Division 
National Vital Statistics Division 

Organization funding after September 1963 reorganization 

Office of the Director 

Office of Health Statistics Analysis 

Division of Health Interview Statistics 

Division of Health Examination Statistics 

Division of Health Records Statistics 

Division of Vital Statistics 

Division of Data Processing 

\_/ Includes the immediate Office of the Director, the Office of the Assistant 
Director, the Office of the Executive Officer, the Office of Information and 
Publications, and junior professional trainees in rotational assignments. 



901 


869 


151 


174 


1,425 


1,439 


1,063 


1,057 


599 


605 


497 


490 


1,725 


1,876 



II 



121 



Division of Health Interview Statistics 

PROGRAM To collect, analyze and publish statistical data on the social 
OBJECTIVES and demographic dimensions of morbidity, disability, use of 
medical services, health expenditures and other health 
measurements in the noninstitutional population of the United 
States; to carry on an aggressive program of research in 
health interview survey methodology; and to assist others in 
the application of survey methods and in the use of survey 
results. 

EXTENT There is an urgent and increasing demand for current infor- 
OF THE mation on the health and medical care status of the national 
PROBLEM population. In recent years, rapid changes have occurred in 
the patterns of use of physician and specialist services, in 
hospitalization, in methods of treatment, in financing of 
health care and in many other factors affecting the health of 
the people. At the same time, there have been changes in the 
age distribution of the population, in income and educational 
levels, in urban-rural patterns, and in other characteristics 
related to morbidity, disability and receipt of health 
services. Information on these subjects and their inter- 
relationships is needed to appraise the levels of health of 
the people, to assist in program planning, to identify 
research needs, and to measure the personal and national 
economic impact of work loss and other disability. 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



The Health Interview Survey carries on a long-range program 
for development of new health topics ; a program of methodo- 
logical and evaluative research to improve survey techniques; 
a continuous national sample survey of persons interviewed in 
their own homes; and a program of analysis, publication and 
other release of both methodological and substantive survey 
findings. A wide range of health topics is covered on a 
continuing basis and, in addition, supplementary surveys are 
conducted at intervals to obtain additional detailed data on , 
specific health problems. At present, interviews are 
conducted weekly in a probability sample of about 1+2,000 
households, or 1 1+0, 000 persons, representative of the non- 
institutional population of the United States and of a number 
of geographic and demographic subclassifications of the 
population. Approximately 15 analytical and methodological 
reports are produced each year. 

PHS Act, as amended, Sec. 305 {h2 USC 2ii2c). 



SOURCE 
OF FUNDS 



Appropriation - National Health Statistics, PHS. 



11-122 



Division of Health Interview Statistics — Statistical Summary 
DIVISION CHIEF; Philip S. Lawrence, Ph. D. 



ORGANIZATION OF PROGRAM (June 30, 196k) 

Unit 

Office of the Chief 
Computations Staff 
Analysis and Reports Branch 
Survey Methods Branch 



Total 



Employees 

5 

9 

5 

J+_ 

23 



PERSONNEL (as of June 30 ) 

Paid employment 
In D. C. area 



1961+ 

23 
23 



FUNDS (fiscal year) 

Total available 
Appropriation 

Funds available for : 
Direct operations 



(in thousands) 



1961* 1965 

$1.1*25 $ 1,U39 
1.U25 V+39 



1,1)25 1.U39 



PROGRAM STATISTICS 

Households interviewed 

Persons in sample of house- 
hold interviews 

Number of hospitalizations 
reported in interviews 

Number of illness conditions 
reported in interviews 

Percent of noninterviews in 
sample 

Percent of refusals 

Publications in regular NCHS 
series 



I960 1961 1962 1963 196U 

36,580 36,1+87 36,367 1+2,731 1+0,183 

118,068 119,51+7 118,1+32 139,055 129,801 

ll+,120 13,550 13,762 18,363 17,770 

106,091+ 112,086 116,562 11+1,951 136,798 



1+.8 


fc.7 


1+.8 


5.0 


l+.l 


.9 


.8 


.9 


1.0 


.9 



11 



12 



10 



10 



11-123 



Division of Health Examination Statistics 

PROGRAM To collect, analyze ana disseminate data on illness and 
OBJECTIVES disability in the United States, focusing on data which is 
obtained by direct health examinations, laboratory tests 
and measurements of individuals who are a probability sample 
of the population studied; and to conduct research on the 
survey methodology of health examinations. 

EXTENT OF The Public Health Service has the responsibility to protect 
PROBLEM and improve the health of Americans. This makes it necessary 
to have current and reliable information on the prevalence 
of specific diseases and disabling conditions. Research 
workers and program administrators in the health field need 
this information. Certain types of data can be obtained only 
by sample surveys which entail direct examination. Examples 
are prevalence data on specifically defined diseases, 
distributions of the population by such physiological variables 
as blood pressure or visual acuity, and information on the 
extent of disease which has not been previously brought to 
medical attention. 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



The division conducts a succession of health examination 
surveys, each directed to a segment of the population and to 
a set of objectives. These surveys are called "cycles." 
Simultaneously, the division analyzes and reports results from 
a completed cycle, conducts examinations and collects data on 
the succeeding cycle, and plans and carries out methodological 
research on the third cycle. The surveys use specially 
designed mobile examination centers and traveling teams of 
physicians, dentists and other specialized personnel. Data 
on the prevalence of various chronic diseases in the adult 
population already has been published, data on the growth and 
development of children (ages 6 through 11 years) are being 
collected, and a survey of the 12-through-lT-year-old popu- 
lation of the Nation is in the planning and pretesting stages. 
The Bureau of the Census cooperates in various areas of the 
work on a contract basis. 

PUS Act, as amended, Sec. 305 (U2 USC 2l+2c). 



SOURCE 
OF FUNDS 



Appropriation - National Health Statistics, PHS. 



II - 124 



Division of Health Examination Statistics — Statistical Summary 
DIVISION CHIEF: Arthur J. McDowell 



ORGANIZATION OF PROGRAM (June 30, 196U) 

Unit 

Office, of the Chief 
Sampling and Demographic Branch 
Data. Analysis and Reports Branch 
Operations Management Branch 
Field Examination Staff 



?otal 



Employees 

12 

2 

5 

9 
29 
57 



PERSONNEL (as of June 30) 



Paid enrnlovment 

I ■ H I ! ill I It I I II 

In D. C. area 
Outside D. C. area 



196U 

51 
?8 

29 



FUNDS (fiscal year) 

Total available 
Appropriations 

Funds available for : 
Direct operations 



(in thousands) 



196H 1965 

$1,063 4 1,057 
1,063 1,057 



1,063 1,057 



PROGRAM STATISTICS 

Children age 6-11 included in 
national sample 

Children in sample -participating 
in examination survey 

Locations at which examinations 
were conducted 

Miles traveled by mobile exami- 
nation caravans 

Publications resulting from earlier 
sample of adult population 



196k 

3,570 

3,1+25 

19 

8,200 

k 



11-125 



Division of Health Records Statistics 

PROGRAM To collect, analyze, interpret and publish national and 
OBJECTIVES vital health statistics and related data obtained by sample 
surveys utilizing health and vital records and to administer 
a continuing program for ascertaining the needs for these data 
and for developing the most efficient means for producing the 
data. 

EXTENT OF There is an urgent and increasing demand for current infor- 
PROBLEM mation on the number and characteristics of persons suffering 
from illness, injuries or impairments, and in the use of 
hospitals, physicians, dentists and other services. Such 
information is needed for appraising the true state of health 
of the population, for program planning, for research and for 
population analysis. 

PRESENT The Health Records Statistics Division consists of three types 
PROGRAM of sample survey activities: (l) the Vital Records Surveys to 
SCOPE supplement and amplify the information contained on vital 
records by collecting information from relatives and from 
sources such as physicians and hospitals that provided health 
services; (2) a Hospital Discharge Survey, a continuing survey 
of short-term hospitals, relying predominately upon abstracting 
information from existing hospital records for samples of 
discharge patients, to obtain national and regional statistics 
on characteristics of patients and diagnoses for which treated 
as well as for statistics on hospital care, and services, 
charges and sources of payment; (3) the Institutional Popu- 
lation Surveys, a series of surveys of institutional establish- 
ments such as long-term hospitals, nursing homes and homes for 
the aged, relying in large measures upon abstracting infor- 
mation from existing records for samples of resident patients 
in order to obtain detailed statistics on various aspects of 
health care. 

LEGAL PHS Act, as amended, Sec. 305 (U2 USC 2U2c) and Sec. 312(a) 
BASIS and 313 (k2 USC 2Mta, 2U5); Reorganization Plan No. 2 of 19^6 
(5 USC 133y - 16 note). 



SOURCE 
OF FUNDS 



Appropriation - National Health Statistics, PHS 



II - 126 



Division of Health Records Statistics — Statistical Summary 
DIVISION CHIEF : Monroe G. Sirken, Ph. D. 
ORGANIZATION OF PROGRAM (June 30, 196*0 

Unit 



Office of the Chief 
Survey Clerical Staff 
Vital Records Survey Branch 
Institutional Population Survey Branch 
Hospital Discharge Survey Branch 



Total 



Employees 

5 

10 

6 

6 

_2 

30 



PERSONNEL (as of June 30) 

Paid employment 
In D. C. area 



FUNDS (fiscal year) 

Total availahle 
Appropriated 
Other funds 

Funds available for : 
Direct operations 



(in thousands) 



PROGRAM STATISTICS 

National Mortality Surveys - Number 

of recent deaths included in 

sample survey 
National Natality Surveys - Number 

of recent births included in 

sample survey 
Master Facility Inventory - Number 

of places included in list of 

hospitals and institutional 

establishments 
Resident Places Surveys 

Sample of establishments in survey 
designed to obtain general infor- 
mation about health of residents ■ 
and facilities in places providing 
personal care primarily to the 
aged population 

Sample of establishments in survey 
designed to obtain more detailed 
information about establishments — 
their facilities, staff qualifica- 
tions, and residents providing 
personal care to the aged population 



5,200 10,500 

U,300 

30,000 



3,350 



196h 

30 
30 



196U 1965 



$599 

55T 

h5 



$ 605 

585 

20 



599 605 



1961 1962 1963 196*4 1965 



12,000 

8,600 



1,200 



11-127 



Division of Vital Statistics 

PROGRAM To collect, analyze and publish the official U. S. vital 
OBJECTIVES statistics of births, deaths, fetal deaths, marriages and 

divorces; to conduct health and social-research studies based 
on vital records; to coordinate Federal, State and local 
activities into an effective national vital statistics system; 
to conduct both fact-finding and methodological research in 
vital and health statistics on the administrative and legal 
aspects of vital records as well as on the scientific aspects 
of health and demography; and to improve vital statistics and 
their applications through technical assistance and 
professional training at the Federal, State, local and inter- 
national levels. 

EXTENT OF (l) Since vital statistics data originate from 56 independent 
PROBLEM jurisdictions, their diverse activities and interests must be 
coordinated to produce the national vital statistics while 
continuing to serve State and local program requirements. 
(2) The need for timely, accurate, clear, factual vital data 
on a multitude of current problems is rapidly expanding. (3) 
The increasing uses to which vital data are being put are 
constantly changing, in health programs, medical research, 
social welfare, population analysis and economic and political 
planning at all levels, (h) The rapid development of new or 
improved statistical tools and techniques, as in survey 
methods and computer applications, require flexibility of 
methods and continual staff development and training. 

PRESENT (l) Regular publication of certain monthly provisional 
PROGRAM statistics. (2) Comprehensive annual statistics with geo- 
SCOPE graphical detail for States and lesser areas. (3) Special 
research studies, some in cooperation with other agencies 
within and outside the Public Health Service, (k) Life tables. 
(5) Special services to consumers of vital statistics data on 
a reimbursable basis. (6) Informational publications on vital 
registration. (T) Promulgation of a model vital statistics 
act. (8) Promulgation of standard vital certificates. (9) 
Development of complete national marriage and divorce 
statistics. 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



PHS Act, as amended, particularly Sec. 312(a) and 313 (**2 USC 
2UUa, 2U5); Reorganization Plan No. 2 of 19^6 (5 USC 133y-l6 
note) . 



SOURCE 
OF FUNDS 



Appropriation - National Health Statistics, PHS. 



ADVISORY Standing Committee (on joint Federal-State vital and health 
GROUPS statistics problems). 



11-128 



Division of Vital Statistics--Statistical Summary 

DIVISI ON CHIEF ; Robert D. Grove, Ph„ D. 

ORGANIZATION OF PROGRAM (June 30, 1964) 

Unit 

Office of the Chief 

Registration Methods Branch 

Mortality Statistics Branch 

Natality Statistics Branch 

Marriage and Divorce Statistics Branch 

Total 



Employees 

10 
11 
10 
5 
_9 
45 



PERSONNEL (as of June 30) 

Paid employment 
In D. C. area 



1964 

45 
45 



FUNDS (fiscal year) 

Total available 
Appropriation 
Other funds 

Funds available for : 
Direct operations 



(in thousands) 



1964 

$ 497 
496 

1 

497 



1965 



$ 490 



486 

4 

490 



PROGRAM STATISTICS (cal. year) 
Number in US (reg.in thousands) 

Births 

Deaths 

Fetal deaths, 20 wks„ or more 

Marriages 

Divorces 
Number of areas reporting 

births, deaths, fetal deaths 

Notifiable diseases 5/ 
Number of registration areas as of 

July 1 

Marriages 

Divorces 
Publications released to printer 

Periodical 

Annual and special studies 

Procedural instruction manuals 
Completion of annual reports 

(Months after the data year) 

Vol. I, Natality 

Vol. II, Mortality 
Consultative activities 

Conference & technical meeting 

Surveys of State offices 

Consult, trips to State offices 
1_/ Includes Alaska for the first t 
3/ Provisional. 4/ Estimated. 5/ 



1959 1/ 1960 2/ 1961 



1962 



1963 



4,245 4,258 4,268 4,167 4,098 

1,657 1,712 1,702 1,757 1,814 

69 68 69 66 NA 

1,494 4/ 1,523 4/ 1,548 1,580 3/ 1,651 3/ 

395 4"/ 393 %/ 414 4/ NA NA 



56 
56 


56 
56 


56 


56 


56 


36 

19 


36 
19 


39 
21 


39 

22 


39 
23 


76 
93 
21 


50 
42 
29 


38 
21 
29 


39 
21 
21 


39 
18 
11 


18 
14 


11 
16 


14 
15 


12 
12 




39 

4 

19 


30 

1 

20 


32 

1 

23 


23 



14 


18 

2 

19 



ime. 2/ Includes Hawaii for the first time. 
Transferred to CDC, 1960. 



11-129 



NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE 

PROGRAM The Library functions to support the totality of the national 
OBJECTIVES effort devoted to medical research, education, and care by 

both public and private agencies through making published bio- 
medical knowledge more readily available to users. This availa- 
bility has two aspects: knowledge of the existence of publica- 
tions, and accessibility to the publications themselves. The 
Library acts as an ultimate resource for all institutions, 
groups, and individuals in the United States seeking to locate 
medical publications. The Library carries out these objectives 
through intramural and extramural programs. 

SCOPE OF The Library's collection policy is global, comprising all publica- 
ACTIVITIES tions, of all times, and in all languages. Present holdings 
total 1,116,935 cataloged pieces: books, journals, theses, 
pamphlets, prints. It is the largest resource of such materials 
in the world. Due to the Library's efforts the literature of 
the medical sciences has been indexed for a longer period and 
more comprehensively than that of any other scientific field. 
This indexing function was shifted to a computer base in FY 1964, 
and the resulting MEDLARS Project constitutes the largest machine 
information storage and retrieval system yet to be accomplished 
in any scientific field in any country. Through its Photo- 
duplication Service the Library supports a national network of 
medical and scientific libraries, making approximately two 
million pages of photocopy annually on behalf of universities, 
hospitals, institutions, agencies of Federal, State, and local 
government throughout the United States and overseas. 

Through the Extramural Program, the utilization of recorded 
scientific information is facilitated by the support of the 
publication of monographs, critical reviews, directories, 
abstracts, and bibliographies, and the translation of bio- 
medical literature important to the national health effort. 
The management of the published literature, including access 
and dissemination, is improved through the conduct and support 
of studies to improve capability for storing, retrieving and 
disseminating biomedical literature, fostering programs to 
train librarians and specialists in the communication of 
recorded medical knowledge, and support of research, as well as 
training programs, in the history of the life sciences, with 
special reference to the history of medicine especially as it 
relates to social, cultural, and scientific advancements. 



LEGAL PHS Act, Sees. 
BASIS 275 - 280a). 



301, and 371 to 377 /as amended/ (42 USC 241; 



SOURCE OF National Library of Medicine; Scientific Activities Overseas; 

FUNDS Buildings and Facilities; Advances and Reimbursements 

ADVISORY Board of Regents of the National Library of Medicine; Advisory 

GROUPS Committee on Scientific Publications 



II - 130 



National Library of Medicine—Statistical Summary 

DIRECTOR : Dr. Martin M. Cummings 

ORGANIZATION OF NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE (June 30, 1964) 

Unit Employees Unit Employees 

Office of Director 38 History of Medicine Division 13 

Extramural Program 11 Bibliographic Services Division 29 

Technical Services Division 60 Reference Services Division 70 

Data Processing Division 37 Total 259 



PERSONNEL (as of June 30) 

Paid employment 
In D. C. area 
Outside D. C. area 



1960 



1961 



1962 



1963 



1964 



215 


222 


216 


238 


259 


205 


212 


216 


238 


259 


10 


10 












FUNDS (fiscal year) 

Total available 
Appropr iat ions 
Other funds 



Funds available for : 
Direct operations 
Direct construction 
Grants 



1961 



1962 



1963 



1964 1965 est. 





(in thousands) 






$1,773 


$4,281 


$3,348 


$4,094 


$4,000 


1,738 


4,267 


3,335 


4,084 


3,947 


35 


14 


13 


10 


53 


1,773 


4,152 
129 


3,348 


4,094 


3,825 

55 

120 



PROGRAM STATISTICS 
(fiscal year) 
Growth of collection 
Acquired: 

Books 

Serial pieces 

New serial titles added 
Cataloged (titles) 
Circulated (volumes) 
Pho todup 1 ic at ion : 

Orders completed 

Filmed for orders (pages) 

Filmed for preservation 
purposes (pages) 
Published in Index Medicus 

(items) 



1960 



1,049 



1961 



1962 



1963 



(in thousands) 
1,066 1,084 1,098 



1964 



1,117 



16 


17 


11 


16 


20 


69 


70 


64 


68 


71 


1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


22 


27 


17 


15 


14 


135 


153 


161 


206 


214 


91 


105 


108 


130 


126 


2,080 


2,137 


2,356 


2,327 


1,967 


892 


690 


577 


903 


1,291 


112 


130 


142 


139 


133 



II? - 131 



Bureau of Medical Services 

BUREAU To meet the medical care needs of Public Health Service 
RESPONSI- beneficiaries, and to administer foreign quarantine legis- 
BILITIES lation, International Sanitary Regulations, and the medical 
aspects of immigration laws. 

SCOPE OF Administers medical care programs for Indians and Alaska 
ACTIVITIES Natives (380,000), merchant seaman (117,800), active and 
retired Coast Guard personnel, PHS Commissioned Officers, 
and officers and crewmen of the Coast and Geodetic Survey 
(51,000), persons with leprosy, narcotic drug addicts, 
Federal employees with a job-related, compensable injury or 
illness, and several other beneficiary groups; furnishes 
public and preventive health services for Indian communi- 
ties. Serves as the focal point for administration of PHS 
responsibilities under the Uniformed Services Dependents' 
Medical Care Act. 

As corollaries to the provision of medical care services, 
provides training for physicians, dentists, and other health 
personnel and conducts studies and demonstrations in clinical 
research, treatment methods, and administrative practices. 

The administration of quarantine laws and the medical aspects 
of foreign immigration includes inspection and vaccination of 
persons at ports of entry to prevent introduction of communi- 
cable diseases; a medical screening program overseas for visa 
applicants and physical examinations of immigrants at ports 
of entry; inspections of certain imports; and control programs 
for rodents and insects. 



BUREAU 
PROGRAMS 



ADVISORY 
GROUPS 



The Bureau is also responsible for detailing medical personnel 
to the Bureau of Prisons, Coast Guard, and Bureau of 
Employees' Compensation, and for the medical care activities 
of these agencies. The Bureau, in cooperation with the Agency 
for International Development, recruits, orients, and provides 
technical guidance to surgical teams assigned to Vietnam. It 
provides consultative services to Government agencies on the 
establishment of employee health programs. 

The programs of the Bureau are: 

Hospital and Medical Care 
Indian Health 
Foreign Quarantine 

The Bureau also has supervisory responsibilities for Freedmen's 
Hospital* 

Advisory Committee on Hospitals and Clinics 



11-132 



Bureau of Medical Services--Statistical Summary 



CHIEF OF BUREAU : Dr. Leo J. Gehrig 

ORGANIZATION (June 30, 1964) 

Unit 

Office of the Chief 
Division of Hospitals 
Division of Indian Health 
Division of Foreign Quarantine 
Federal Prison Service 
Details to agencies outside PHS 



Total 



Employee* — 

47 
6,792 
5,547 

693 

291 

141 



13,511 



PERSONNEL (as of June 30) 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 

Paid employment - 12,955 13,085 13,471 13,668 13,511 

In D.C. area 698 511 523 554 527 

Outside D.C. area 12,257 12,574 12,948 13,114 12,984 



FUNDS (fiscal year) 

Total available— 
Appropriations 
Net transfers, 

reimbursements and 

other funds 

Funds available for ; 
Direct operations 
Payment to Hawaii 
Hospital construction 

research 2/ 
Construction of Indian 

Health facilities 
Nurse training grants 3/ 
Hospital construction 

grants 2/ 
Dependents' medical 

care (contract payments) 
Direct construction 



1960 



1963 



1961 1962 

(in thousands) 

$304,607 $123,987 $128,871 $140,999 $140.615 

295,414 113,969 117,629 123,803 127,103 



1964 1965 (Est. ) 



S147.679 
134,074 



9,193 10,018 11,242 17,196 13,512 13,605 



104,443 


110,298 


117,029 


122,186 


129,830 


134,083 


1,000 


1,200 


1,200 


1,200 


1,200. 


1,200 


1,200 


.... 


.... 


• • • • 





.... 


4,787 


9,714 


8,285 


14,698 


6,176 


8,466 


5,910 

















185,000 


• • • • 


• • • • 





.... 





2,267 


2,645 


2,357 


2,915 


3,409 


3,459 



* Actual paid employment (full and part-time) June 30, 1964. 
1/ Excludes employees and funds for Freedmen's Hospital. 
2/ Transferred to Bureau of State Services, November 20, 1960. 
3/ Transferred to Bureau of State Services, September 1, 1960. 



471 



II - 133 



Foreign Quarantine 

PROGRAM To administer foreign quarantine legislation, International 
OBJECTIVES Sanitary Regulations, and medical aspects of immigration 
legislation, thereby preventing the introduction into the 
United States of quarantinable diseases and other illnesses 
that pose a significant threat to public health and economy. 

EXTENT The increase in world travel, especially in volume and speed 
OF of air transport, has intensified quarantine problems. 
PROBLEM Medical inspections of arriving aliens continue to increase 
as a result of expanded tourism, exchange programs, and 
immigration from nonquota areas or under special law. Ex- 
amination of visa applicants abroad requires consultation 
and supervision of local physicians by Public Health Service 
personnel. Legislation permitting entry of certain afflicted 
aliens requires assurance of adequate controls at local 
levels . 

PRESENT Inspection and vaccination programs covering persons and 
PROGRAM certain imports are carried out at ports of entry to prevent 
SCOPE introduction of quarantinable diseases and certain other 
communicable diseases into the United States. Insect and 
rodent control programs are conducted on ships and airplanes 
and in port areas; a ship sanitation program is carried out. 
Medical examinations are performed for visa applicants abroad, 
and medical inspections are performed for aliens at ports of 
entry to exclude those afflicted with mental illness and 
certain other specified conditions. Headquarters office 
receives, analyzes, and disseminates data on world-wide 
communicable disease prevalence and immunization requirements; 
designates yellow fever vaccination centers; and performs 
other functions under International Sanitary Regulations. 
Headquarters and field personnel participate in domestic and 
international conferences dealing with the control of quaran- 
tinable and other dangerous communicable diseases, the 
facilitation of commerce, and related matters; and assist in 
drafting international agreements affecting quarantine. 

LEGAL PHS Act, as amended, particularly Sec. 325, 36I-369 (42 USC 
BASIS 252, 264-272); sections 212 (a) and (f), 221 (d), 234 of the 
Immigration and Nationality Act, as amended (8 USC 1182 (a) 
and (f), 1201 (d), 1224), and related provisions. 

SOURCE Appropriation - Foreign Quarantine - PHS. In addition, 
OF FUNDS reimbursement from carriers for overtime inspectional 
services. 



11-134 



Foreign Quarantine — Statistical Summary 



DIVISION CHIEF: Dr. Louis Jacobs 



ORGANIZATION (June 30, 1964) 



Unit 



Employees 
6 



Office of the Chief 

Administration 19 

Bureau of Medical Service Staff 3 



Unit 



Employees 
3 



Foreign Operations 
Epidemiology & Domestic 

Operations 12 

Field Activities 653 



Total 



696 1/ 



PERSONNEL (as of June 


30) 


1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 




Paid employment 




648 


658 


712 


704 


696 




In D. C. area 




43 


42 


42 


42 


45 




Outside D„ C. area 




605 


616 


670 


662 


651 






FUNDS ($000) 




1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 


1965 Est 


Total available 




$5,392 


$5,747 


$6,811 


$6,606 


$7,249 


$7,531 


Appropriation 




4,534 


4,949 


6,026 


5,910 


6,554 


6,851 


Transfers and reimbursements 


858 


798 


785 


696 


695 


650 



Funds available for : 
Direct operations 



5,392 5,747 6,811 6,603 7,249 7,531 



PROGRAM STATISTICS 
Points of coverage 

U. S. 

Foreign 



1960 



1961 



1962 



1963 



1964 



342 


338 


401 


403 


408 


319 


316 


380 


380 


384 


23 


22 


21 


23 


24 



Alien examinations (000) 
Visa applicants 
Entering aliens 
Migratory farm laborers 2/ 



173.4 185.1 189.2 

2,945.3 3,132.3 3,296.0 

477.7 338.8 310.2 



187.2 170.1 

3,887.5 4,557.2 

203.4 189.9 



Quarantine services (000) 
Aircraft inspections 
Aircraft treated for Insects 
Vessel inspections 
Inspections of individuals 
Via Mexican border 3/ 
Via aircraft 
Via vessels 
Smallpox vaccinations 



70.4 65.7 65.2 


69.0 


72.4 


17.2 19.3 19.6 


17.7 


20.3 


33.2 32.1 33.0 


32.6 


35.0 


24 , 000 . 24,644 . 25, 645 .0 


68,876.7 


111,654 .3 


2,165.7 2,417.2 2,728.3 


3,111.5 


3,725.2 


1,968.0 1,966.6 1,985.3 


1,960.2 


2,034.2 


525.6 564.6 667.0 


668.6 


747.6 



1/ Includes Farm Labor and temporary employees. 

2/ At United States Reception Centers. 

3/ Through the first part of FY 1963, includes only Mexican border crossers inspected 
by PHS. For the remainder of FY 1963 and all of FY 1964, includes all crossers 
inspected by the four inspectional agencies under the Joint Primary Screening 
Program. This Program was implemented during the period November 1962 through 
February 1963. 



II 




Hospitals and Medical Care 

PROGRAM To meet the inpatient and outpatient medical care needs 
OBJECTIVES of beneficiaries eligible for treatment, and to provide 
consultative and contract services to Federal Agencies 
in establishing employee health programs. 

EXTENT OF Health needs differ sharply among the various beneficiary 
PROBLEM groups served by this program. Complete health care is 
provided to certain groups, such as the 117,800 actively 
employed merchant seamen, the 51,100 active and retired 
Coast Guard personnel, PHS commissioned officers, and 
officers and crewmen of the Coast and Geodetic Survey. 
Eligibility of some beneficiaries is based on the pres- 
ence of a specific illness or condition: leprosy or 
narcotic drug addiction in the general population and 
compensable job-related injuries or illnesses of Fed- 
eral employees. Certain others, such as foreign seamen, 
beneficiaries of Federal Agencies and dependents of 
active-duty and retired military personnel may receive 
care on a reimbursable basis. In addition, approximate- 
ly 65,300 dependents of uniformed members of the Coast 
Guard, Public Health Service, and Coast and Geodetic 
Survey are entitled to medical care. 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



To meet the medical and dental care needs of beneficiaries 
eligible for complete care, a network of 12 general hospi- 
tals (with 2,972 constructed beds) and 25 outpatient 
clinics is operated in the major port cities. Part-time 
physicians' services are obtained through contract in 191 
locations where the volume of required care does not war- 
rant a full-time activity. Non-Federal hospitals under 
contract are used for emergency situations in locations 
where there are no PHS hospitals. Leprosy patients are 
treated at the national leprosarium, a 450-bed hospital 
in Carville, La.; beds for narcotic drug addicts are 
available at two psychiatric hospitals with a combined 
constructed bed capacity of 1,769. Training for 
physicians, dentists, and other health personnel, and 
clinical research are conducted at the larger hospitals. 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



PHS Act, as amended, particularly Sec. 321-346 (42 USC 
248-261); the Dependents' Medical Care Act, approved 
June 7, 1956 (P.L. 569, 84th Congress): 10 USC 1071- 
1085; 5 USC 150; P.L. 88-71, approved July 19, 1963. 



SOURCE OF Appropriation - Hospitals and Medical Care, PHS 
FUNDS Reimbursements - From Federal Agencies, foreign shipping 
operators and others for medical care. 



11-136 



Hospitals and Medical Care - Statistical Summary 



DIVISION CHIEF : Dr. 6. P. Ferrazzano 
ORGANIZATION (June 30, 1964) 



Unit 




Employees 


Unit 




Employees 


Inpatient and Outpatient ' 


Care 1/ 


6,627 


Coast Guard 




99 


Federal Employee Health Program 


100 


Detailed 


to Other 


Agencies 


20 


Outpatient Offices and Designated 




Operation 


of Commissaries 


12 


Physicians 




195 


Working Capital Fund 2/ 
Total 


50 




6,908 


PERSONNEL (As of June 30) 


1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 




Paid Employment 


6,712 


6,964 


7,060 


7,144 


6,908 




In D. C. area 


269 


314 


322 


341 


313 




Outside D. C. area 


6,443 


6j650 


6,738 


6,803 


6,595 




FUNDS (Fiscal Year) 


1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 


1965 Est, 




(In Thousands of 


Dollars) 








Total available 


50,980 


54,990 


57,107 


56,276 


59.565 


62,032 


Appropriation 


45,291 


49,035 


50,334 


48,820 3/ 51,332 


53,338 


Reimbursements 


5,660 


5,955 


6,773 


7,456 


8,243 


8,694 



Transfer in (Civil Defense) 29 



Funds available for 
Direct operations 



49,980 53,790 55,907 55,076 58,365 60,832 



Payments to Hawaii 




1,000 


1,200 


1,200 


1,200 


1,200 


1,200 


PROGRAM STATISTICS 
















Patient Care Provided 




1960 & 


1961 - 1 


1962 4/ 


1963 


1964 




Outpatient visits (000) 




1,202 


1,207 


1,294 


1,354 


1,385 




Inpatient admissions (000) 


63.3 


64.0 


66.7 


67.5 


68.0 




Daily average census 




5,267 


5,059 


5,127 


5,008 


4,920 




General hospitals 




2,641 


2,543 


2,609 


2,521 


2,478 




Tuberculosis hospital 


5/ 


157 


- 


- 


- 


- 




Psychiatric hospitals 




1,915 


1,907 


1,889 


1,864 


1,813 




Leprosarium 




281 


285 


303 


308 


314 




Contract 




273 


324 


326 


315 


315 




General hospitals 




1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 




Per diem cost 




$23.48 


$25.95 


$26.48 


$27.81 


$29.65 




Days of stay 




21.2 


20.6 


20.2 


19.0 


18.7 





1/ includes several units previously reported separately. 

2/ Excluded from total of 6,908. 

3/ Excludes $2,915,000 Dependents 1 Medical Care funds now carried in Retired 

Pay of Commissioned Officers appropriation. 
4/ Revised to exclude newborn and patients attended by PHS officers for whom 

the PHS did not pay the cost of hospitalization. 
5/ Closed June 15, 1960. 



II -137 



Indian Health 

PROGRAM To elevate the health of Indian and Alaska Native beneficiaries 
OBJECTIVES to the highest possible level; to encourage and assist Indians 
and Alaska Natives in self-help activities and increased as- 
sumption of responsibility for their health affairs; to promote 
equitable utilization of non-Federal resources for Indians. 

EXTENT OF Health status is about a generation behind level of population 
PROBLEM at large. Mortality from infectious diseases is 2 to 7 times 
greater; infant mortality about twice as high; 3 to h times 
higher in post-neonatal period (28 days - 11 months), mainly 
from infectious diseases, often associated with substandard en- 
vironment - crowded poor housing, inadequate sanitary facilities 
and unsafe water supplies. Communicable diseases among children 
are high and associated illnesses result in much disability. 
The geographical, social and cultural isolation of beneficiary 
groups greatly hamper provision of health services. 

PRESENT About 337,000 Indians in 23 States, the majority west of the 
SCOPE OF Mississippi, and 1+3,000 Indians, Eskimos and Aleuts in Alaska, 
PROGRAM are potential beneficiaries. Through a system of 50 hospitals, 
kk health centers and hundreds of field clinics, comprehensive 
preventive, curative, rehabilitative, and environmental health 
services are provided. Included are public health nursing, 
maternal and child health, dental, nutrition, sanitation, and 
health education. Additional services are provided through con- 
tractual arrangements with 200 community hospitals, 400 private 
health practitioners, and 19 State and local health departments. 

Training is conducted for practical nurses, dental assistants, 
sanitation aides, nursing assistants, community workers, health 
record technicians, food workers and other health workers. 

LEGAL P.L. 83-568 transferred responsibility for health services from 
BASIS the Bureau of Indian Affairs, Department of the Interior, to the 
Public Health Service, effective July 1, 1955; P.L. 85-I5I, 
August 1957, authorized use of appropriated funds for partici- 
pation in community hospital construction to serve Indians and 
non- Indians; P.L. 86-121, July 1959, authorized the PHS to con- 
struct, improve, and extend sanitation facilities for Indians. 

SOURCE OF Appropriations: Indian Health Activities; Construction of 
FUNDS Indian Health Facilities; Accelerated public Works program- 
facilities construction. Reimbursements mainly from Dept. of 
the Interior. 

ADVISORY Surgeon General's Advisory Committee on Indian Health; Consul- 
tant Committee on Nutrition Research and Indian Tribal Councils 
and their health components. 



II - 138 



Indian Health - Statistical Summary 



DIVISION CHIKF: Dr. Carruth J. Wagner 

ORGANIZATION OF DIVISION OF INDIAN HEALTH (June 30, 196k) 

Unit Employees 
Hospital Health Services 3,759 
Contract {fedical Care Services 8 
Field Health Services 951 
Headquarters Program Direction 147 
Area Office Services 37^ 
Total full-time filled positions 
Total part-time 
Total paid employment 



5,239 
160 

5; 399 



PERSONNEL (as of June 30 ) 
Paid Employment - Total 
In D. C. Area 
Outside D. C. Area 



I960 
5^56 
i4i 
^,815 



sr 



iffo 
5,C*9 



1962 

14T 
5,275 



1963 
5^373 
3S5 
5,225 



1964 
5,399 
3S7 
5,252 



FUNDS (Fiscal Year) 
Indian Health Activities 
Total Available 

Appropriations 

Reimbursements 
Construction of Indian Health Facilities 
Total Appropriations (excl. APW) 

Hospitals, clinics, qtrs., comm. hosp. 
const. (PL 85-151) 

Sanitation facilities (PL 86-121) 



I960 I96T" 



$46,440 $51,068 

45,700 50,271 

740 797 



I962 1963 
(in thousands^ 
$53,885 $57,51' 
53,010 5678? 
875 681 



1964 



1965 E 



$60,376 $62,380 
59, 698 61,620 
678 760 E 



$ 4,787 $ 9,714 $ 8,285 $ 9,335 $ 6,100 $ 8,335 

4,587 7,164 5,285 5,335 1,413 4,285 
200 2,550 3,000 4,000 4,687 1/ 4,050 



Accel. Public Works Construction - 5,363 

\j Includes $750,000 appropriated for Alaska Earthquake damage. 



76 31 



Services Provided through PHS Indian Facilities and Contract Facilities 



" T96O I96I I962 1963 1964 



Hospital Inpatient Services 
Admissions (excl. births*) 

PHS Indian and Contract 76,75^ 7^, 313 81,476 

* Births in DIH Hospitals 8,330 8,436 8,859 

General patients account for 98$ of all hospital admissions, 1964. 
Average Daily Patient Census 

Total (excl. newborn - all types) 3,142 2,975 3,24l 

PHS Indian Hospitals 2,232 2,120 2,334 

Contract Hospitals 910 855 907 

Tuberculosis inpatient census currently 18$ of total, compared to 28$ in i960. 

Outpatient Magical Visits - Total (in thousands) 

Indian hospital clinics 585. 1 628.7 673.2 721-7 7^2.4 

Indian health centers & field clinics 394.4 389. 1 442.1 5^9-3 552.0 



87,549 
9,192 



3,266 
2,377 
889 



89,934 
9,458 



3,211 
27315 
895 



Dental corrective and preventive services 
provided - DIH and contract 



322.8 350.0 355-2 384.6 446.0 



II - 139 



Freedmen's Hospital 



PROGRAM 
OBJECTIVES 



The Hospital's activities embrace four basic objectives: 

(1) Care of the sick and injured; 

(2) Training of medical and allied personnel; 

(3) Cooperation with Public Health agencies in 
preventing diseases and promoting health; and 

(4) Aiding in the advancement of medicine through 
scientific research. 



PRESENT This 487-bed general medical hospital with specialized 
PROGRAM facilities for chronic chest diseases is affiliated with 
SCOPE the College of Medicine of Howard University. The 
Hospital's primary interest is to provide the best 
possible care for the sick. The Hospital serves the 
community and the nation through its various teaching 
programs for doctors, nurses, pharmacists, dietitians, 
administrative personnel, X-ray technicians, dentists, 
medical social workers, and other auxiliary personnel. 

Public Law 87-262, approved September 21, 1961, authorized 
the transfer of Freedmen's Hospital to the private ownership 
and control of Howard University. The purpose of this act 
was to establish a teaching hospital for Howard University, 
thereby assisting the University in training medical and 
allied personnel and in providing hospital service for the 
community. The effective date of transfer is to be no 
later than the beginning of the second month after 
construction of the new hospital facility commences. 
The initial program planning for the new building has 
been completed and the University has begun negotiation 
with an architectural firm. 

LEGAL 13 Stat. 507; 18 Stat. 223; 37 Stat. 172, as amended; 

BASIS 59 Stat. 366, as amended; 33 Stat. 1190, as amended; 

32 D. C. Code, Sections 317-319; Reorg. Plan No. IV 

of 1940, 5 USC 133 to note; P.L. 87-262. 

SOURCE OF The Hospital's programs are financed: 

FUNDS (1) By direct appropriation of the Federal Government; 

(2) By payments from individuals for care as in- or 
outpatients; and 

(3) By reimbursements from the District of Columbia 
and other localities for care of their indigent 
patients. 



II - 1 40 



Freedmen's Hospital - Statistical Summary 



SUPERINTENDENT OF HOSPITAL : Dr. 
ORGANIZATION (June 30, 1964) 



Charles E. Burbridge 



Activity 
General Hospital 
Chronic Disease "Hospital 
Out-Patient Services 
Full-Pay Pavilion 



Employees 


Activity 


Employees 


530 


Training 


195* 


60 


Administration 


70 


67 


Total 




72 


994 



*Includes 167 Student Trainees 





PERSONNEL (As of June 30) 1950 
Paid Employment 830 


1961 
870 


1962 
892 


1963 
995 


1964 
994 



Direct operations 



PROGRAM STATISTICS 



4,818 



5,388 



5,913 



6,184 



6,648 



FUNDS (Fiscal Year) 


1960 


1961 


1962 
(In Thou 


1963 
sands) 


1964 


1965 Est 


Total Available 


$4,818 


$5,388 


$5,913 


$6,184 


$6,648 


$6,926 


Appropriations 


3,190 


3,498 


3,736 


3,909 


3,880 


3,873 


Reimbursements 


1,623 


1,889 


2,173 


2,271 


2,764 


3,050 


Trust Funds 


5 


1 


4 


4 


4 


3 


Funds Available for 















6,926 



General Hospital Program 


1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 


Admissions 


10,650 


11,171 


11,019 


11,161 


10,850 


Births 


3,055 


3,379 


3,199 


3,572 


3,538 


Pt. Da. (Incl. Newbn.) 


109,633 


115,806 


116,141 


118,488 


118,575 


Daily Av. Pt. Load 












(Incl. Newbn.) 


300 


317 


318 


325 


324 


Chronic Disease Program 












Admissions 


240 


259 


260 


275 


321 


Pt. Days 


19,529 


21,003 


20,711 


17,361 


18,779 


Daily Av. Pt. Load 


53 


58 


57 


48 


51 


Pavilion 1/ 












Admissions 








365 


1,216 


Patient Days 








4,208 


14,240 


Daily Av. Pt. Load 








12 


39 


Outpatient Program 












Emergency Room Visits 


37,513 


39,923 


40,685 


44,725 


47,395 


Clinic Visits 


57,901 


54,865 


55,942 


56,192 


55,093 



Training Program 
Number of Students 



158 



176 



165 



150 



167 



1/ Opened February 1963. 



II - 141 



Bureau of State Services - Community Health 

BUREAU The primary responsibility of Community Health is to stimulate 
RESFONSI- the widespread application of health knowledge. Its mission is 
BILITY to provide leadership, stimulation and support in the coordinated 
development of preventive, curative, and restorative services for 
the general population, including manpower, facilities, and 
methods through which such services are provided. It works with 
State and local health departments and other official agencies, 
concerned with health, and a variety of professional and 
voluntary groups to help define public health problems, to develop 
effective ways of dealing with them, and to encourage the adoption 
of improved health practices for the prevention, treatment and 
control of diseases and the recurrence and progression of chronic 
diseases and related problems of the aged. 

SCOPE OF The Bureau carries out its mission through direct operations and 
ACTIVITIES through financial assistance. Direct operations involve a wide 
range of services to and cooperative arrangements with other 
organizations. These include studies, experiments and demonstra- 
tion projects; professional consultation on speeial health 
problems; and a variety of services not otherwise available, such 
as training courses, aid to diagnostic laboratories, and epidemic 
surveillance . 

Financial assistance in the form of grants is provided for support 
of various health programs; for construction of hospitals, other 
health facilities, and teaching facilities; for research, develop- 
ment, and training activities; and for the conduct of special 
projects in prevention and control of disease, and for the develop- 
ment and demonstration of new types of health services. 

BUREAU Advances in knowledge and changing health needs call for shifts 
PROGRAMS in emphasis of community health programs. New or strengthened 
programs are needed for the control of chronic diseases and care 
of patients with long-term illness. At the same time, growth of 
urban and suburban areas and changes in population pattern pose 
new health challenges relating to the provision of health services 
in the community. 

The Community Health Divisions are: 

Accident Prevention 
Chronic Diseases 
Communicable Disease Center 
Community Health Services 
Dental Public Health 8s Resources 
Hospital & Medical Facilities 
Nursing 



11-1^2 



Community Health Activities 
Bureau of State Services - Statistical Summary 

DEPUTY CHIEF OF BUREAU : Dr. Aaron W. Christensen 
ACTING ASSOCIATE CHIEF : Dr. Paul Q. Peterson 

ORGANIZATION (June 30, 1964) 

Unit Employees 

Office of the Chief 180 

Community Health Divisions 

Division of Accident Prevention 151 

Division of Chronic Diseases 893 

Communicable Disease Center 2,749 

Division of Community Health Services 272 

Division of Dental Public Health and Resources 251 

Division of Hospital and Medical Facilities 234 

Division of Nursing 127 

Total 4,857 

PERSONNEL (As of June 30) 196l3 / I962 1963 1964 

Paid employment 5.419 3,724f , 4, 381^ kj&Tr' 

In D. C. area 1,62b 1,053V 1,259 l,Wf 

Outside D. C. area 3,791 2,671 3,122 3,410 

FUNDS (Fiscal year) 196l 3/ 1962 1963 1964 196_5(Est.) 

(in thousands) 

Total available $337.153 $327.872 $470.640 $395.310 $530,391 

Appropriation 331,685 326,207 362,637 386,361 527,251 

Other funds 5,468 1,665 108,003 8,949 3,l40 

Funds Available for 

Direct Operations 57,505 34,489 42,090 55,027 63,808 
Grants 232,947 281,383 425,350 339,897 466,338 

Direct Construction (Build- 
ings & Facilities) 600 12,000 3,200 386 245 



y Includes 88 positions for Community Health Activities Management Fund. 
2/ Includes 101 positions for Community Health Activities Management Fund. 
2/ Includes Environmental Health Activities. 
4/ Includes l80 positions for Community Health Activities Management Fund. 



II - 11+3 



Division of Accident Prevention 

PROGRAM To minimize deaths and injuries from accidents by developing knowl- 
OBJECTIVES edge required to establish effective programs. This is done by 
research, epidemiological investigations, and the collection and 
analysis of data, and by encouraging and assisting State and local 
agencies in the establishment and conduct of full-time coordinated 
accident prevention activities. 

EXTENT OF Accidents are the leading cause of death in ages 1 through 3^. 

PROBLEM In 1962, accidents caused 97,139 deaths. It is estimated that in 
1963 there were about 101,000 deaths from accidents. According 
to the latest available estimates, nearly 52 million persons, or 
28 persons per 100 population, are injured annually. Of these 
persons, over 38 million receive medical care for injuries. Each 
year injuries cause 2 million persons to be hospitalized. 
Emergency room visits exceed 10 million. Losses resulting from 
injury account for h6o million days of restricted activity. It 
is estimated that prevalence of physical impairments caused by 
injuries in the non-institutionalized population of the United 
States is over 10 million. 

PRESENT Epidemiological projects are being carried out in several phases 
PROGRAM of accident causation, and findings translated into prevention 
SCOPE measures. In some areas, prevention programs are being carried 
out and evaluated both as to results in general and the effect 
of specific techniques. Accidental injury reporting systems 
have been established and injuries and deaths are being studied 
both for the Nation as a whole and for specific areas in cooperation 
with the National Vital Statistics Division, the National Health 
Survey Division, and State and local health departments. 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



Technical assistance is provided on the establishment and 
operation of poison control centers, and consultation as well as 
technical assistance is provided to State and local agencies on 
the establishment and conduct of accident prevention activities. 

PHS Act, as amended, particularly Sec. 301, 314 (42 USC 24l, 246), 



SOURCE OF 
FUNDS 



Appropriation - Accident Prevention Activities, PHS 



ADVISORY 
GROUPS 



Surgeon General's Advisory Committee on Accident Prevention 



II - 144 



Division of Accident Prevention— Statistical Summary 



DIVISION CHIEF: Dr. Paul V. Joliet 



ORGANIZATION (June 30, 1964) 












Unit 


Employees 


Unit 




Qnployees 


Office of Chief 




22 


Poison Control Branch 


17 


Program Planning & Consultation 


10 


Recreation Safety 




4 


Traffic Safety Branch 




14 


Research Branch 




54 


Family Safety Branch 




10 


Regional Office Staff 


20 














151 


PERSONNEL (as of June 30) 


1961 




1962 


1963 


1964 

in 




Paid employment 


122 




A! 2 . 


172 




In D. C. area 


83 




99 


113 


99 




Outside D. C. area 


39 




1962 


59 


52 




FUNDS (fiscal year) 


1961 


1963 


1964 


1965 (Est. 








(i 


n thousands) 






Total available 


$1,323 




$3,588 


$3,687 


$4,185 


$3,826 


Appropriation 


1,290 




3,554 


3,664 


^,l«5 


3,025 


Other funds 


33 




34 


23 





1 


Funds available for: 














Direct operations 


1,323 




1,667 


1,859 


2,110 


2,131 


Grants 


- 




1,921 


1,828 


2,075 


1,695 


PROGRAM STATISTICS (United States 


years indicated) 






Accidental deaths 


1958 




1952 


i960 


1961 


1962 


All accidents 


90,604 




9270I0 


93,806 


92,249 


97,139 


Motor vehicles 


36,981 




37,910 


38,137 


38,091 


40,804 


Home 


22,749 




23,020 


24,628 


23,118 


24,184 


Other and unspecified 


30,874 




31,150 


31,041 


3i,o4o 


32,151 


Accidental deaths as percent of all 


deaths by age 


i960 
29 


30 




Under one 
1-4 


1958 




2f 


31 


5 -14 


42 




40 


41 


41 


41 


15 - 24 


52 




52 


53 


53 


53 


25 - 34 


29 




29 


29 


30 


30 


35-44 


14 




14 


14 


14 


14 


45 - 54 


6 




7 


7 


7 


7 


55 and over 


3 




3 


3 


3 


3 


Estimated number of persons injuredj 


, United States 


ers in Millions) 










(Numb 




Total 


1959 
Wo 




ir 


1961 


1962 


1963 
51TH 


While at work 


8.3 




8.7 


7.6 


7.2 


7-7 


Home 


18.6 




19.0 


20.6 


21.4 


23.5 


All other (incl. moving 














motor vehicle) 


16.1 




18.8 


18.8 


21.3 


2Q.6 



II - 1 45 



Division of Chronic Diseases 

PROGRAM The Division is responsible for planning, conducting, and 
OBJECTIVES coordinating comprehensive nationwide programs for preventing the 
occurrence and progression of chronic, long term illness and 
related health problems of the aged. The activities of the 
Division are aimed at encouraging and assisting State and 
community organizations in the development, operation, and 
improvement of programs for the prevention of chronic diseases. 

EXTENT OF Approximately 19 million persons in the non-institutionalized 
PROBLEM population are limited to some extent in their activities due 

to chronic disease or impairment. Among 4 million of these who 
are unable to work, keep house or carry on other major activities, 
24 percent named heart conditions as the cause, 16 percent re- 
ported arthritis or rheumatism, and 11 percent reported visual 
impairment. Cancer is diagnosed for the first time in one 
million persons each year and causes 15 percent of all deaths. 
Cardiovascular diseases cause more than 900,000 deaths, or more 
than 50 percent of all deaths each year in the U.S. 

PRESENT The activities of the Division are conducted by the Office of the 
PROGRAM Division Chief and seven operating programs: Cancer Control, 
SCOPE Diabetes and Arthritis, Gerontology, Heart Disease Control, 

Neurological and Sensory Disease Service, Mental Retardation, and 
Nursing Homes. In carrying out its responsibilities the Division: 

Develops programs for the application of known, 
practical measures for the prevention and control 
of specific diseases that are major causes of 
disability and dependency; 

Assists States in developing and strengthening 
community health services needed for persons 
afflicted with or highly subject to disability 
and dependency; 

Appraises technical research findings and selects, 
develops, tests, and applies those holding the 
most promise for achieving the overall mission of 
the Division. 

During FY 1963 a Gerontology Branch and Nursing Homes Branch 
were established. Care and preventive services functions were 
strengthened by the addition of Associate Division Chiefs with 
specific responsibilities in each of these areas. In FY 1964 
a Mental Retardation Branch was established. 



LEGAL 
BASIS 

SOURCE OF 
FUNDS 



PHS Act, as amended, particularly Sec. 301, 311, 3l4c, 3l4e, 316, 
1*02, 1*03, ^12, (42 USC 241, "243, 246c, 246e, 247a, 282, 283, 287a). 

Appropriation - Chronic Diseases and Health of the Aged, PHS 



ADVISORY Heart Disease Control Advisory Committee; Advisory Committee to 
GROUPS the Cancer Control Program; Advisory Committee on Neurological 
and Sensory Disease Service Program 

II - 146 



Division of Chronic Diseases— Statistical Summary 



DIVISION CHIEF : Dr. Eugene H. Guthrie 
ORGANIZATION: (June 30, 1964) 



Unit 




Employees 


Unit 




Employees 


Office of the Chief 




99 


Cancer Control 


115 


Associate Chief for Care Services 


38 


Diabetes and Arthritis 


63 


Associate Chief for Preventive Services 


13 


Gerontology 




21 


Regional Office Staff 




93 


Heart Disease Control 


318 


Administrative Services 




23 


Neurological 


and Sensory 77 








Mental Retardation 


11 








Nursing Homes 


22 












B93 


PERSONNEL (as of June 30") 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 




Paid employment 


443 


676 


849 


893 




In D. C. area 


250 


357 


559 


525 




Outside D. C. area 


173 


319 


390 


368 




FUNDS (fiscal year) 


1961 


1962 


1963 
(in thousands) 


1964' 


1965 (Est.) 


Total available 
Appropriation^ 


$13;680 


$31,795 


$49,221 ; 


$55,997 


$53,929 


13,593 


31,682 


49,137 


55,902 


53,724 


Other funds 


87 


113 


84 


95 


205 


Funds available for: 












Direct operations 


5,180 


9,362 


10,479 


14,170 


13,118 


Grants 


8,500 


22,^33 


38,742 


41,827 


40, 811 


PROGRAM STATISTICS 


1950 


1959 


I960 


1961 


1962 


Mortality (rate per 100,000) 










Cervical cancer 


9-8 


8.6 


9-3 


9.2 


9-0 


Colon-rectum cancer 


21.8 


21.8 


22.0 


22.0 


21.9 


Lung cancer 


18.6 


19.4 


20.3 


21.2 


22.2 


Diabetes 


15.9 


15-9 


16.7 


16.5 


16.8 


Stroke 


110.1 


IO8.5 


108.0 


105.5 


106.3 


Coronary 


266.3 


268.8 


275.6 


274.6 


283.9 


All other heart disease 


101.6 


94.6 


93-4 


88.0 


86.4 


Estimated prevalence of chronic ( 


lisease and conditions 




Persons over age 45 with chronic disease and conditions 


36,953, 


000 


Total persons with chronic 


disease and 


conditions 




80,266/ 


000 



Arthritis and rheumatism 12,688,000 

Cerebrovascular disease 2,000,000 

Diabetes 4,000,000 

Cancer 830,000 

Visual impairments 4,745,000 

Mental Retardation 5,400,000 

Hearing impairment 7,685,000 

Persons receiving personal care in the home 

Persons with limitations of activity due to chronic conditions 



1,128,000 
22,226,000 



II - 1 47 



Communi cable Disease Center 

PROGRAM To plan, conduct, coordinate, and evaluate a comprehensive nation- 
OBJECTIVES wide program in cooperation with the State and local health 

agencies for the prevention and control of all infectious 

diseases and of certain other preventable ones. 

EXTENT OF Communicable diseases and their sequelae annually cause nearly 
PROBLEM 140,000 deaths. They account for one of every 12 deaths, with 
a higher ratio in the population under 35 years of age. More 
than one million cases of communicable diseases have been re- 
ported annually for the past five years. Infectious syphilis 
continues to increase and tuberculosis is increasing slightly in 
some parts of the country. Effective prevention tools for many 
infectious diseases, particularly vaccines, are not being fully 
utilized. 

PRESENT The Communicable Disease Center translates findings of basic 
PROGRAM research into practical application in disease control through: 
SCOPE (a) laboratory and field studies for development of improved 

techniques, materials, and equipment; (b) testing and evaluating 
preventive public health measures; (c) demonstration, con- 
sultation, and educational activities including training and the 
production and use of audiovisuals*; (d) continuous surveillance of 
communicable disease through epidemiologic investigations; (e) 
furnishing epidemic and disaster aid to States when requested; 
(f ) assisting in the enforcement of interstate quarantine regula- 
tions; (g) provision of diagnostic services and reagents to 
States; (h) provision of grants to States and local communities 
for the control of venereal disease, tuberculosis, and to assist 
them in carrying out intensive community vaccination programs de- 
signed to protect their populations, especially preschool children, 
against poliomyelitis, diptheria, whooping cough, and tetanus; 
and (i) systematic collection and publication of current 
statistics on notifiable diseases in the States and on deaths in 
large cities. The Communicable Disease Center provides technical 
services in the area of communicable disease control and training 
to WHO as well as to foreign aid agencies of the U. S. Government 
such as AID and the Peace Corps. The Center is also engaged in 
cooperative research under P. L. 83-480, as amended. 

LEGAL PHS Act, as amended, particularly Sec. 301. 311, 314, 317, 361, 
BASIS 363, (42 USC 241, 243, 246, 247b, 264, 266). 

SOURCE OF Appropriations - Communicable Disease Activities, PHS; Control of 
FUNDS Venereal Diseases, PHS; Control of Tuberculosis, PHS; and other 
PHS appropriations. 

ADVISORY Communicable Disease Center Advisory Committee; Association of 
GROUPS State and Territorial Public Health Laboratory Directors; 

Conference of State and Territorial Epidemiologists; National 
Advisory Serology Council; Public Advisory Committee on Venereal 
Disease Control; Tuberculosis Control Advisory Committee; Surgeon 
General's Advisory Committee on Influenza; Surgeon General 1 s 
Advisory Committee on Poliomyelitis; Advisory Committee on 
Immunization Practices. 



11-148 



Communicable Disease Center— Statistical Summary 



DIVISION CHIEF: Dr. James L. Goddard 



ORGANIZATION (June 30, 1964) 










Unit 


Employee 


s 1 


Jhit 


Employee 


s 


Executive Office 


393 


Technology Branch 


305 




Epidemiology Branch 


234 


Training Branch 


69 




Laboratory Branch 


446 


Tuberculosis Branch 


200 




Medical Audiovisual Branch 


104 


Venereal Disease Branch 856 








Aedes 


Aegypti Branch 


142 

2,759 




PERSONNEL (as of June 30) 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1965 




Paid employment 


1,876 
143 


2,036 


2,378 


2,749 




In D. C. area 


97 


100 


100 




Outside D. C. area 


1,73? 


1,?3? 


2,278 


2,649 




FUNDS (fiscal year) 


1961 


1962 


1963 
(in thousands) 


1964 


1965 (Est, 


Total available 


$22,767 


$38,787 


$40,091 


$50,066 


$53,682 


Appropriations 


21,879 


37,731 


38,687 


47,785 


51,066 


Other funds 


888 


1,056 


1,404 


2,281 


2,616 


Funds available for: 












Direct operations 


15,767 


18,802 


15,980 


24,246 


28,498 


Grants 


6,4oo 


7,985 


20,911 


25,434 


24,939 


Buildings and facilities 


600 


12^000 


3,200 


386 


245 


PROGRAM STATISTICS 


1959 
ected diseas 


i960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


Reported morbidity from sel 


es in the 


United States: 






Amebiasis 


3,508 


3,424 


2,850 


3,048 


2,886 


Brucellosis 


892 


751 


636 


409 


407 


Diphtheria 


934 


918 


617 


444 


314 


Encephalitis, infectious 


2,437 


2,341 


2,248 


2,094 


1,818 


Hepatitis, infectious and 












serum 


23,574 


41,666 


72,651 


53,016 


42,974 


Measles 


406,162 


441,703 


423,919 


481,530 


385,186 


Meningococcal infections 


2,180 


2,259 


2,232 


2,150 


2,470 


Meningitis, other and 












Aseptic 


5,638 


5,317 


5,162 


2,654 


1,844 


Pertussis (whooping cough) 


40,005 


14,809 


11,468 


17,749 


17,135 


Poliomyelitis 


8,425 


3A90 


1,312 


910 


449 


Salmonellosis 


6,606 


6,929 


8,542 


9,680 


15,390 


Shigellosis (bac. dysentery) 12,888 


12,487 


12,571 


12,443 


13,009 


Strep. Sore Throat & 












Scarlet Fever 


334,715 


315,173 


338,410 


315,809 


342,l6l 


Tetanus 


445 


368 


379 


322 


325 


Typhus Fever (Tick borne 












and flea borne) 


250 


272 


265 


272 


251 


Typhoid Fever 


859 


816 


814 


608 


566 


Venereal Diseases: 












Syphilis 


120,766 


122,003 


124,658 


126,245 


124,137 


Gonorrhea 


240,158 


258,933 


264,158 


263,708 


278,289 


Other venereal diseases 


2,459 


2,8ll 


2,466 


2,l4l 


1,979 


Tuberculosis (new active 












cases) 


57,307 


55,494 


53,727 


53,788 


54,062 



II - 149 



Division of Community Health Services 

PROGRAM To improve community health and medical services through 
OBJECTIVES activities that would enhance efficiency, effectiveness, and eco- 
nomy in the organization, administration, and delivery of such 
services. Specifically, to assist official agencies and private 
organizations concerned with providing comprehensive health care 
to all members of their communities; to increase and improve the 
training of health personnel; and to add to the body of know- 
ledge in the fields of health economics, public health and med- 
ical care administration, health communications, and continuing 
education of health personnel. 

EXTENT OF Community health and medical services in most parts of the 
PROBLEM country are organized and administered according to patterns 

developed in the early part of the present century. Advances in 
medical science, higher standards of living, population changes, 
changes in the pattern of disease, and the development of 
voluntary health insurance have rendered older patterns in- 
effective and uneconomical. The problem of developing and apply- 
ing better methods of planning, coordination, and financing of 
health and medical services exists in most communities. 

PRESENT Develops and provides information on the planning, organization, 
PROGRAM and financing of community health and medical services, as well 
SCOPE as on training resources. Consultation is provided to Federal, 
State, and local organizations. Research, demonstrations, and 
evaluations are conducted and supported. Grants are awarded to 
training institutions and individual trainees. Loans are 
awarded for students in dental, medical and osteopathic training. 
Studies are conducted in health economics, public health and 
medical care administration, metropolitan health problems, 
alcholism, and health education of the public. Special programs 
are administered for the improvement of school health and for 
health services to domestic agricultural migratory workers and 
their families. 



LEGAL 
BASIS 

SOURCE OF 
FUNDS 

ADVISORY 
GROUPS 



In recognition of urgent health problems a redirection of program 
efforts resulted in establishment of a Health Communications 
Branch and a Metropolitan Health Section. A law enacted in 1963 
authorized a program for the establishment and operation of a 
student loan fund in public or non-profit schools of medicine, 
osteopathy and dentistry. The Division was also assigned respon- 
sibility for formulation and development of an alcoholism program. 

PHS Act, as amended, particularly Sec. 301, 306, 309, 310, 311, 314, 

316, 740-745, (42 USC 241, 242d, 242g, 2k2h, 243, 246, 247a, 294). 

* 1964 amendment included optometry schools 

Appropriations - Community Health Practice and Research, PHS; and 

other PHS Appropriations. 

National Advisory Committee on Public Health Training; Migrant 
Health Project Review Committee 



II - 150 



Division of Community Health Services— Statistical Summary 



DIVISION CHIEF: Dr. Burnet M. Davis 



ORGANIZATION (June 30, 1964) 












Unit 


Employee! 


3 








Office of Chief 


16 










Public Health Administration 


32 










Research Grants 


8 










Public Health Training 


28 










Health Communications 


11 










Health Economics 


26 










Medical Care Administration 


27 










Migrant Health 


4o 










Regional Offices 


84 
272 










PERSONNEL (as of June 30) 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 




Paid, employment 
In D. C. area 


11*8 
136- 


201 
109 


349 

232 


-fg 




Outside D. C. area 


12 


92 


117 


91 




FUNDS (fiscal year) 


22& 


1962 


1963 
(in thousands) 


1964 


1965 (Est.) 


Total Available 


£25,318 
22,404 


$^,596 
24,145 


$28,450 


*g& 


$46,744 


Appropriation 


28,404 


46,705 


Other funds 


2,914 


451 


46 


29 


39 


Funds available for: 












Direct operations 


3,802 


2,093 


3,167 


3,487 


8,682 


Grants 


21,430 


22,503 


25,283 


26,227 


38,062 



11-151 



Division of Dental Public Health and Resources 

PROGRAM To protect and improve the dental health of the people of the 
OBJECTIVES United States by developing methods for preventing, controlling, 
and treating dental diseases, by encouraging the adoption of 
proved methods, fostering research, and by providing assistance 
to State and local dental programs. 

EXTENT OF More than 165 million people in the United States either have 
PROBLEM been victims of or face the almost certain prospect of suffering 
from one or more dental diseases. Dental disorders are pro- 
gressively cumulative, and require many hours of professional 
treatment time. Family expenditures for treatment services total 
$2.4 billion annually. The public health problem of dental disease 
is complicated by the declining proportion of dentists to 
population, cost of treatment, and inadequate public understanding 
of oral health problems. 

PRESENT The program of the Division measures the national dental problem, 
PROGRAM and it develops, improves, and promotes technical procedures, 
SCOPE facilities, and methods for preventing and controlling dental 

diseases. The program, conducted through developmental research 
activities, provides technical assistance to health departments, 
professional community groups, and other groups. 



Research 

Fluoridation of public and 

individual water supplies 
Defluoridation 
Dental care needs 
Social attitudes 
Prevalence indices 
Preventive and control measures 
Auxiliary personnel 
Educational methods 
Dental manpower 
Dental morbidity 
Statistical procedures for 

dental programs 
Epidemiological investigations 



Assistance to States 

Problem definition 

Personnel utilization 

Program planning and evaluation 

Technical assistance 

Training 

Evaluation of educational 

procedures 
Dental services for special 

groups 
Statistical consultative 

services 
Dental hygiene consultative 

services 



The Division is initiating cooperative epidemiological and 
related studies under P.L. 83-^80, as amended. 

LEGAL PBS Act, as amended, particularly Sec. 301, 311, 422, (42 USC 24l, 
BASIS 243, 288a) 

SOURCE OF Appropriations - Dental Service Resources, FHS; and other PHS 
FUNDS Appropriations. 

ADVISORY National Advisory Dental Research Council; Advisory Committee on 
GROUPS Dental Student Training Grants 



11-152 



Division of Dental Public Health and Resources— Statistical Summary 



DIVISION CHIEF: Dr. Donald J. Galagan 



0RGANI2ATI0N (June 30, 196k) 












Unit 






Employees 




Executive Direction and Central Service 




47 






Disease Control Branch 






33 






Social Studies Branch 






17 






Health Programs Branch 






17 






Manpower and Education Branch 




70 






Dental Health Center 






Vf 






Regional Offices 






20 
251 






FERSONNEL (as of June 30) 


1961 


1962 


1963 


i<*4 




Paid Employment 


-m 


276 


312 


251 




m D. C. area 


115 


132 


135 




Outside D. C. area 


77 


161 


180 


116 




FUNDS (fiscal year) 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 


1965 (Est.) 






(in thousands) 






Total available 


$1,979 


*& 


$5,663 


$6,259 


$7,194 


Appropriation 


1,979 


5,663 


6,259 


7,172 


Other funds 





5 








22 


Funds available for: 












Direct operations 


1,979 


2,318 


3,245 


3,425 


3,621 


Grants 





2,132 


2,418 


2,834 


3,573 


PROGRAM STATISTICS 


1959 


i960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


State Dental Programs 
Expenditures (000) 


$3,318 


$3,574 


$3,939 


$4,250 


$8,700^ 


State 


1,750 


2,026 


2,350 


2,470 


6,579 


Local 


244 


245 


243 


250 


344 


Grants to States 












Assistance to State (PHS) 207 


238 


195 


235 


334 


Children's Bureau 


1,117 


1,065 


1,151 


1,295 


1,417 


Other Federal 














26 


Personnel 


303. 


Si 


314 


328 

TOT 
56 


367 


Dentists: Full-Time 
Part-Time 


"&/ 


%/ 


> 


208 

66 


Dental Hygienists 


82 


87 


89 


88 


93 


Dental Resources 


103,581^ 










Dentists 


105, l4l 


106,796 


108,000 


109,000 


Dental Schools 


47 


^7 


47 


48 


48 


Dental hygiene schools 


34 


37 


43 


47 


49 


Controlled Water Fluoridation (comulative totals) 








Communities fluoridating 


1,878 


2,008 


2,317 


2,612 


2,645 


Water supply systems 












fluoridating 


1,048 


1,152 


1,346 


1,482 


1,511 


Pop. on fluoride water (000) 36,199 


38,864 


43,758 


46,678 


47,064 


Per Capita Expenditures 
for Dental Services 


1959 


i960 


1961 


1962 


1963^ 
$l5to7 


Actual 2/ 
Adjusted-^ 


$10.75 


$11.11 


$11.46 


$11.98 


10. 47 


10.61 


10.89 


11.09 


11.58 


1/ More inclusive reporting < 


of funds for State Dental Health Units is reflected in the 


increase over 1962 figure 


s. 










2/ BLS price index for dental care 1957-59 base. 









11-153 



Division of Hospital and Medical Facilities 
A. Hill-Burton Program 



PROGRAM 
OBJECTIVES 



EXTENT OF 
PROBLEM 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



LEGAL 
BASIS 

SOURCE OF 
FUNDS 

ADVISORY 
GROUPS 

RECENT 
CHANGES 



To assist the States in providing adequate hospital and medical 
facilities through a program of construction or modernization grants 
or loans; to improve the utilization of health facilities and their 
services through programs of research and areawide planning. 

The need and demand for additional hospital and long-term care beds 
and for modernization of existing facilities is acute. Progress in 
alleviating this critical shortage continues slowly due to popula- 
tion increases and obsolescence of existing facilities. Relatively 
small amounts of funds are devoted to health facility research or 
areawide planning even though the size of the investment in hospital 
and health facility physical plants and the cost of hospital care 
continue to increase. 

The construction of hospitals, public health centers, long-term care 
facilities, diagnostic centers or diagnostic and treatment centers, 
and rehabilitation facilities involves a planning phase and the 
actual construction phase. States conduct surveys to determine their 
needs for health facilities and develop Statewide construction plans. 
Individual projects are entitled to Federal financial assistance 
provided they conform with the State plan and have the approval of 
the State agency administering the program and of the PHS. Federal 
participation ranges from one-third to two-thirds of the total costs 
of constructing and equipping health facilities. As of June 30, 1964, 
a total of 7,372 construction projects had been approved, of which 
6,046 were completed and in operation, 1,088 under construction, and 
238 in preconstruction stages. Upon completion, these projects will 
provide 313,762 hospital beds and 2,096 public health centers and 
other medical facilities. 

Under the Accelerated Public Works program 282 projects involving a 
total cost of $301,174,977 and Federal APW funds in the amount of 
$112,503,055 had been approved as of June 30, 1964. 

Effective methods of utilizing and coordinating health facility 
service and resources are developed through an areawide planning 
program, through a program of research conducted by universities, 
hospitals, and States and their political subdivisions, and through 
a program of intramural research. 

Title VI of the PHS Act, as amended (P.L. 88-443). Transfer-Public 
Works Acceleration, Executive Office of the President. 

Appropriations - Hospital Construction Activities, PHS. 

Federal Hospital Council; Health Services Research Study Section. 

The Hospital and Medical Facilities Amendments of 1964 (P.L. 88-443) 
extend the Hill-Burton program through fiscal year 1969. The Hill- 
Harris amendments also make several important program changes; a new 
modernization grant program beginning in fiscal year 1966; a new 
program for areawide planning grants; the combining of separate pro- 
grans for chronic disease hospitals and nursing homes into a single 
category of long-term care facilities, and increasing the authori- 
zation from $40 million to $70 million; and the authorization for 
States to use 2 percent of allotments ($50,000 maximum) in adminis- 
tering the State plan. 

II - 15^ 



Division of Hospital and Medical Facilities (Hill-Burton Program) — Statistical Summary 
DIVISION CHIEF: Dr. Harald M. Graning 



ORGANIZATION (June 30, 196*0 



Unit 


Employees 


Unit 




Employees 


Office of the Division Chief 


10 Intramural Branch 


19 


Administrative Branch 




37 Research Grants 


Branch 


6 


Operations Branch 




29 Equipment Planning Branch 


8 


Architectural & Engineering Branch 


23 Regional 




78 


Program Evaluation & Reports Br. 


24 






2^4 


PERSONNEL (as of June 30) 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 




Paid employment 


183 


187 


is 


234 




In D. C. area 


115 


120 


156 




Outside D. C. area 


68 


67 


75 


78 




FUNDS (fiscal year) 


1961 


1962. 


i26j 


1964 


1965 (Est.; 








(in thousands) 




Total available i 


£187,936 


$219,618 


$332,654 


$237,833 


$228,150 


Appropriation 


187,93d 


219,617 


226,214 


231,289 


227,899 


Transfer 


- 


1 


106,440 


6,544 


251 


Funds available for: 












Direct operations 


1,936 


2,189 


2,829 


2,916 


3,207 


Grants (Hill-Burton) 


186,000 


217,429 


223,600 


228,477 


224,768 


Accel. Public Works 


- 


- 


106,225 


6,440 


175 


Obligations 


189,689 


197,136 


324,048 


226,098 


227,960 


Direct operations 


1,915 


2,178 


2,775 


2,881 


3,200 


Grants (Hill-Burton) 


187,774 


19^,958 


215,460 


216,828 


224,760 


Accel. Public Works 


- 


- 


105,813 


6,389 


- 


PROGRAM STATISTICS (fiscal 


I960 


19bl 


1902 


1963 


1964 


year) 












Projects approved during year 574 


489 


548 


583 


564 


Inpatient beds added to 












program 


20,950 


19,686 


25,259 


24,684 


23,328 


Hospitals - general 


15,207 


13,402 


18,045 


17,490 


14,315 


- tuberculosis 


24l 


35 


67 


- 


- 


- mental 


1,008 


1,427 


1,301 


864 


1,068 


Long-term care facilities 


k,49l*- 


4,822 


5,846 


6,330 


7,945 


Outpatient units added to prog. 203 


142 


154 


173 


175 


Public health centers 


75 


42 


43 


57 


50 


State health laboratories 


- 


2 


1 


2 


5 


Diagnostic & treatment centers 87 


62 


67 


75 


88 


Rehabilitation facilities 


41 


36 


43 


39 


32 


Cost of program added (millions) $516 


$459 
165 


$596 


$649 


$593 


Federal 


172 


201 


205 


177 


State and local 


344 


294 


395 


444 


416 


Active -program at end pf F.-V. 


1,600 


1,508 


1,387 




Number of projects 


1,635 


1,326 


Capacity - inpatient beds 


69,362 


70,069 


70,956 


69,321 


66,644 


- outpatient units 532 


495 


444 


385 


387 


Cost (millions) 


$1,665 


$1,696 


$1,702 


$1,741 


$1,764 


Federal 


m 


525 


548 


549 


543 


State and local 


1,171 


1,171 


1,154 


1,192 


1,221 



II - 155 



Division of Hospital and Medical Facilities 

B. Mental Retardation Construction Program 



PROGRAM To assist the States and communities in providing adequate 
OBJECTIVES facilities and services for the mentally retarded. 

EXTENT OF Mental retardation can be defined as impairment of ability to 
PROBLEM learn and to adapt to the demands of society. Of the approxi- 
mately 5.4 million mentally retarded persons in the population, 
about 4 percent are confined to institutions. Institutional 
care, facility construction, and special care at home costs 
relatives, States, and communities more than $1 billion yearly. 

PRESENT University-affiliated clinical facility construction appli- 
PROGRAM cations are administered directly by this Division which 
SCOPE cooperates with the Division of Chronic Diseases and the 

National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. 

The Federal share of a project may not exceed 75 percent. 

The construction of day facilities, diagnostic and evaluation 
clinics, and residential facilities are aided by formula 
grants through State agencies. Individual projects are 
entitled to Federal assistance provided they conform with the 
State plan and have the approval of the State agency adminis- 
tering the program and of the Public Health Service. Federal 
participation ranges from one- third to two- thirds of the 
necessary cost of constructing and equipping retardation 
facilities. 



LEGAL 
BASIS 

SOURCE OF 
FUNDS 



Mental Retardation Facilities Construction Act 
(42 USC 2661-65, 2671-77, 2691-96). 

Appropriations - Hospital Construction Activities, PHS. 



ADVISORY 
GROUPS 

RECENT 
CHANGES 



Federal Hospital Council; National Advisory Child Health 
and Human Development Council . 

The legislation was enacted. 



11-156 



Division of Hospital and Medical Facilities (Mental Retardation Construction Program ). 
Statistical Summary 



DIVISION CHTFIF : Dr. Harald M. Graning 
ORGANIZATION; (Tune 30, 1964) 







Unit 


Employees 




Mental Retardation 


8 


PERSONNEL (as of June 30) 




1964 




Paid Employment 




8 




In. D. C. area 
Outside D. C. area 




8 






FUNDS (fiscal year) (in 


thousands) 


1964 


1965 (Est.) 


Total Available 




$5,049 


$17,950 


Direct Operations 
Grants 




49 
5,000-^ 


450 
17,500 


Obligations 




48 


15,945 


Direct Operations 




43 


445 


Grants 




- 


15,500 


PROGRAM STATISTICS (as of 


September 1, 


196W 




University-affiliated facilities 






Applications received 




13 




Total Cost (thousands) 




$13,668 




Federal Share 




9,783 





if Funds are available until expended 



II.- 157 



Division of Hospital and Medical Facilities 

C. Health Professions Construction Program 



PROGRAM To increase the opportunities for training of physicians, 
OBJECTIVES dentists, and other professional health personnel through 

a grant program to assist in the construction of teaching 

facilities. 



EXTENT OF 
PROBLEM 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



Since 1950, there has been a decline in the ratio of 
physicians in private practice to the civilian population. 
To maintain the 1959 ratios to population in 1975, the 
number of physicians will have to increase by 50 percent 
and the number of dentists by 100 percent. It is recognized 
that additional facilities for training are needed and that 
many existing schools should be modernized or replaced. 

The "Health Professions Educational Assistance Act of 1963" 
provides aid to public or other nonprofit schools of medicine, 
dentistry, osteopathy, pharmacy, optometry, podiatry, nursing 
and public health to construct needed teaching facilities. 
An application for assistance from an accredited school is 
evaluated by consultants in each discipline and reviewed by a 
special national advisory group. Grants may not exceed 75 
percent of costs for schools of public health, two-thirds of 
costs for new schools or major expansions, and 50 percent of 
costs for minor expansion, renovation, or replacement of 
existing facilities. 

Title VII Part B of the PHS Act (42 USC 293-293h). 



SOURCE OF Appropriations-Health Professions Educational Assistance, PHS. 
FUNDS 

ADVISORY National Advisory Council on Education for Health Professions. 
GROUPS 



RECENT 
CHANGES 



The legislation was enacted. 



II - 158 



Division of Hospital and Medical Facilities (Health Professions Construction Program)- 
Statistical Summary 

DIVISION CTrngB 1 - Dr. Harald M. Graning 



PERSONNEL (as of June 30) 

Paid Employment 
In D. C. area 
Outside D. C. area 



196$ (Est.T 
39 



FUNDS (fiscal year J (in thousands) 
Total available 

Direct operations 

Grants 
Obligations 

Direct operations 

Grants 



lgbg (EstT)" 



$100,^96 

496 

100,000 

100,490 
490 

100,000 



PROGRAM STATISTICS (&s of October 1, 1964) 



Applications received 
Category 

Total 

Medical 

Nursing 

Dental 

Public Health 

Pharmacy 

Optometry 

Osteopathy 

Grants awarded 



Category 

Total 
Dental 



Number 
88 


Federal Share 

(thousands) 

$255,854 


37 

25 

14 

4 

5 
2 

1 


181,650 
18,243 
38,103 
7,482 
3,844 
1,113 
5M9 


Number 


Total Cost Federal Share 
(thousands) 



2 
7 



$3 ^339 
34,339 



$16,890 
16,890 



11-159 



Division of Nursing 

PROGRAM To give leadership in nursing practice and research, to increase 
OBJECTIVES the number of nurses prepared for leadership positions, and to 
provide a wide range of technical assistance designed to aug- 
ment and improve nursing services throughout the Nation. 

EXTENT OF A shortage of nurses and nursing service persists as the popu- 
PROBLEM lation increases, more sick people require care at home, and 
more people use, and demand more, health and medical services. 
On January 1, 1962, 550,000 professional nurses were employed 
of which about 117,000 worked only part-time. The Surgeon 
General's Consultant Group on Nursing report, "Toward Quality 
in Nursing: Needs and Goals" (PHS Pub. No. 992), highlights 
the scope and complexity of nursing responsibilities for patient 
care, supervision of others, and participation in health 
planning; the needs of nursing education and nursing students 
for financial aid; and the necessity to step up recruitment. 
The number of nurses prepared for teaching administration, super- 
vision, and for the clinical specialties has increased but is 
still short of demands. The total supply of public health nurses, 
excepting school nurses, rose only at the rate of about 100 a 
year between 1950 and i960, despite the population growth and 
the need for home nursing care programs. 

PRESENT The Division continually reviews national nursing needs and 
PROGRAM develops programs designed to augment and improve nursing 
SCOPE services. Appropriate consultation is given to other Federal 
agencies, to State health agencies and, through them, to local 
agencies, and to nursing organizations, hospitals, educational 
institutions and others. The Division administers the program 
of nursing research grants, research training and fellowships. 

RECENT The Nurse Training Act of 1964 establishes a program of financial 
CHANGES assistance to schools of professional nursing through construction 
grants and project grants to improve nurse training, and to 
students through traineeships for graduate nurses and loans for 
students of professional nursing. The Division administers the 
training, formula, and project grant program of the Act, and 
collaborates with other PHS units in carrying out construction 
grants and student loan programs. 

LEGAL PHS Act, as amended, particularly Sections 301, 311, 801, 805, 
BASIS 806, 821, 822 (42 USC 24l, 243,, 296A, 296e, 296f, 2972, 2976). 

SOURCE OF Appropriations - Nursing Services and Resources, PHS; and other 
FUNDS PHS Appropriations 

ADVISORY Nursing Research Study Section, Review Committee on Construction 
GROUPS of Collegiate Nursing Education Facilities, Nurse Scientists 

Graduate Training Committee, National Advisory Council on Nurse 

Training . 



II - 1 60 



Division of Nursing~Statistical Summary 
DIVISION CHIEF: Miss Jessie M. Scott 



ORGANIZATION (June 30, 1964) 

Unit Employees 
Office of the Chief 32 

Public Health Nursing Branch 9 
Statistics & Analysis Branch 14 
Nursing Research Field Center 5 



Unit 
Research & Resources Branch 
Training Grants Branch 
Research Grants Branch 
Regional Office 



PERSONNEL (as of June 30) I90I 1962 



Paid Employment 77 

In D. C. area 65 

Outside D. C. area (w.A.E.) 12 



FUNDS (fiscal year) 

Total available 
Appropriations 
Other funds 

Funds available for : 
Direct Operations 
Grants 



PROGRAM STATISTICS 
Nursing Research Grants 
Extramural Research 

Project approved 

Total Awards 



1961 

7,281 

7I276 

5 

756 

6 ? ^ 



68 

-SI. 



" 190T 

101 

78 
23 



6 



993 

8,460 



HE" 

12J. 
100 



"~196l 
(in thousands) 

10,674 11,256 

10^55 U^E 

6 



1,146 
9,728 



(Funds in thousands) 



1,301 
?,?55 



Nursing Research Fellowships 
Full-time No. awarded 
Amount 

Part-time No. awarded 
Amount 



i960 

37 

976 

70 
36 
23 



1,208 
1961 



210 
36 
23 



50 
1,450 

1962 

-53 

311 

24 

16 



ic 

1,800 

ic 

276 



Employees 

20 

9 

24 

127 



1955 1965 (Est?) 



18,42 
6 



1,741 
16,679 



1964 

—62 

1,999 

1964 

~63 

313 



Professional Nurse Traineeship Program, Fiscal Year 1963 
Traineeships for long-term academic study 
Awards were made to 98 participating schools to provide traineeship aid 
to graduate nurses. Approximately 2.137 nurses received traineeship aid 
during this year. 

Traineeships for short-term training courses 
Sixty-nine grants were awarded to sponsoring agencies for traineeships to 
approximately 5,000 nurses enrolled in 115 courses. 



II - 161 



Bureau of State Services - Environmental Health 

BUREAU Our rapidly changing technology is profoundly affecting our 
RESPONSI- environment, exerting new impacts on public health. The 
BILITIES Bureau is concerned with protecting the nation from chemical, 
physical, and "biological contamination introduced daily into 
our lives. It provides leadership in recognizing and identi- 
fying environmental hazards and. in developing control and pre- 
vention methods and practices which are applied by State and 
local health agencies, industry, labor, and other groups. 

SCOPE OF The Environmental Health programs carry on direct operations 
ACTIVITIES and provide financial assistance to State and local agencies, 
universities and other non-profit organizations and individ- 
uals in the public health field. Direct operations include 
in-house and contracted research on the origin, nature, con- 
trol and prevention of environmental hazards; national and 
regional surveillance networks to determine trends in these 
hazards; technical assistance to, and consultation with or- 
ganizations concerned with environmental problems; training 
courses and other dissemination of technical and non-techni- 
cal information. Financial assistance is provided through 
grants for research, training, program development, and demon- 
stration projects in environmental health and construction of 
waste treatment facilities. 

BUREAU The challenge of Environmental Health requires a comprehen- 
PROGRAMS sive approach to the effect of the total environment on hu- 
man life. This is especially true in light of today's rapid 
growth in population, urbanization, and industrialization. 
Research and development activities are focused at the Robert 
A. Taft Sanitary Engineering Center in Cincinnati, Ohio, which 
also provides other technical services under Bureau manage- 
ment. The current Environmental Health programs are: 

Air Pollution 

Arctic Health Research Center 

Environmental Engineering and Food Protection 

Environmental Health Sciences 

Occupational Health 

Radiological Health 

Water Supply and Pollution Control 



II - 162 



Bureau of State Services - Environmental Health - Statistical Summary 



CHIEF OF BUREAU: 
DEPuTV CHIEF 



Dr. Robert J. Anderson 
Harry G. Hanson 



ORGANIZATION (June 30, 1964) 



Unit 








Employees 






Office of the" Chief 








146 






Arctic Health Research Center 






62 






Environmental Health Sciences 






27 






Sanitary Engineering Center 








236 






Environmental Health Divisions 












Division of Air Pollution 








427 






Division of Environmental 1 


Engineering § Food Protection 


353 






Division of Occupational Health 






220 






Division of Radiological Health 






960 






Division of Water Supply § 


Pollution 


Control 


Total 


1,398 
3,829 






PERSONNEL (As of June 30) 


1960 1/ 


1961 1/ 


1962 


1963 


1964 




Paid employment 


4,452 


5,419 


3,014 


3,522 


3,829 




In D. C. area 


1,346 


1,628 


846 


982 


1,076 




Outside D. C. area 


3,106 


3,791 


2,168 


2,540 


2,753 




FUNDS (fiscal year) 


1960 1/ 


1961 1/ 


1962 


1963 


1964 


1965 (Est) 








(in thousands) 






Total available 


$119,487 


$337,153 


$134,931 


$274,171 


$185,141 


$201,072 


Appropriation 


114,956 


331,685 


133,154 


165,601 


I76,<i79 


196,947 


Other funds 


4,731 


5,468 


1,777 


108,570 


8,462 


4,125 


Funds Available for 














Direct Operations 


38,998 


57,505 


32,370 


42,194 


48,409 


58,902 


Grants to States 


29,345 


33,400 


4,800 


6,500 


7,000 


11,680 


Other grants 


6,144 


13,547 


13,946 


19,022 


26,932 


32,716 


Hospital Construction 














Grants 2/ 


— 


186,000 


— 


— 


— 


— 


Waste Treatment Construction 












Grants 


45,000 


46,101 


80,645 


196,225 


95,960 


90,000 


Buildings and Facilities 


— 


600 


1,600 


10,200 


6,819 


7,774 


Environmental Engineering 














and Food Protection 


— 


— 


1,570 


30 


21 


.- 



— Includes Community Health Activities 

2/ Transferred from Bureau ?f Medical Services to Community Health Activities 



November 20, 1964. 



II - 163 



Division of Air Pollution 

PROGRAM To protect the Nation's air resources; to initiate and 
OBJECTIVES accelerate a national research and development program to 
achieve the prevention and control of air pollution; and 
to encourage and assist the development and operation of 
local, State, and regional air pollution control programs. 

EXTENT OF Air pollutants are gases and mixtures of gases and particles 
PROBLEM in the atmosphere which interfere with man's health, safety, 

or comfort, or with the full enjoyment of his property. Their 
presence is related to growing population, urbanization, and 
industrialization. Investigations thus far indicate that irri- 
tant air pollution aggravates, increases the incidence of, or 
contributes as a cause to acute respiratory infections, acute 
and chronic bronchitis, chronic constrictive pulmonary disease, 
bronchial asthma, and lung cancer as well as causing eye, 
throat, and nasal irritation. Air pollution costs billions of 
dollars annually, due to soiling, corrosion, and damage to vege- 
tation and livestock. 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



Research emphasizes: effects on health, agriculture, and ma- 
terials; identification of specific pollutants; the role of 
meteorology; and methods for effective abatement. The program 
involves direct intramural research and support of research in 
other Federal agencies, States, communities, universities, and 
private research organizations. It provides technical assist- 
ance to State and local agencies. It gathers and disseminates 
information; sponsors training grants to institutions and 
graduate -level trainees; and offers training courses. 

Clean Air Act (P.L. 88-206) ^2 USC l857-l857g, amending 
P.L. 88-159 as amended by P.L. 86-365 and P.L. 87-761. 



SOURCE OF 
FUNDS 



Appropriation - Air Pollution, PHS, 



ADVISORY National Advisory Committee on Community Air Pollution; Inter- 
GROUPS departmental Committee on Community Air Pollution. 

RECENT On December 17, 1963, the Clean Air Act was passed. The Act, 
CHANGES which will be implemented in fiscal year 1965^ provides 

Federal authority (l) for an expanded national program of 
research and development in air pollution control; (2) to 
award grants-in-aid to help local, State, and regional air 
pollution control agencies to initiate, expand, or improve 
their programs; (3) to initiate proceedings to secure abate- 
ment air pollution under specific proceedures outlined in the 
Act; and (k) to establish an Automotive Vehicle and Fuel Pollu- 
tion Advisory Committee 



II - 16L, 



Air Pollution- -Statistical Summary 
DIVISION CHIEF : Vernon G. MacKenzie 
ORGANIZATION (June 30, 1964) 



Unit 




Employees 




Unit 




Employees 


Office of the Chief 




82 


Fie 


Id Studies 




56 


Laboratory of Engineering 




Technical Assistance 




40 


and Physical Sciences 


142 


Training 






25 


Laboratory of Medical 


and 




Research and 


training 






Biological Sciences 




70 


grants 






12 












Total 




427 


PERSONNEL (as of June 30) 


1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 




Paid employment 




268 


298 


380 


398 


427 




In D. C. area 




63 


89 


92 


69 


82 




Outside D. C. area 




205 


209 


288 


329 


345 




FUNDS (fiscal year) 




1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 


1965(Est.) 










(in thousands) 






Total available 




$3,934 


$5,129 


$8,284 


$11,069 


$13,034 


$20,983 


Appropriations 




3,921 


5,112 


8,266 


11,049 


12,974 


20,932 


Other funds 




13 


17 


18 


20 


60 


51 


Funds available for: 




3,934 


5,129 


8,284 


11,069 


13,034 


20,983 


Direct operations 




3,360 


4,566 


6,227 


7,691 


8,183 


10,182 


Grants 




574 


563 


2,057 


3,378 


4,851 


10,801 


PROGRAM STATISTICS 




1959 


1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 


(fiscal year) 
















Operation of Air Sampling 














Network 
















Cities participating 


114 


135 


144 


133 


153 


154 


Non-urban sites 




47 


37 


35 


37 


36 


30 


States having legis! 


Lation 


28 


29 


32 


33 


35 


40 



Employment in State agencies: 
Full time 
Part time 

Grants for University curricula 10 

Graduate traineeships awarded 

Attendees at PHS training 
programs 

Federal agencies 
State and local agencies 
Univers ity 
Industry 
Other 
Total 

Research grants: funded 67 
Amount Awarded fin thousands') l r 314 



120 
104 

10 

6 



174 
209 

10 

5 



226 
216 

8 

6 



297 
208 

10 

9 



305 
191 

16 

19 



52 


66 


81 


166 


180 


146 


327 


418 


211 


434 


13 


124 


51 


36 


44 


120 


223 


337 


88 


220 


61 


63 


99 


184 


59 


392 


803 


986 


685 


937 


66 


71 


78 


97 


111 


1.450 


1,722 


l.QLL 


2.925 


3,851 



11-165 



Arctic Health Research Center 



PROGRAM 
OBJECTIVES 



EXTENT OF 
PROBLEM 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



LEGAL 
BASIS 

SOURCE OF 
FUNDS 



To demonstrate the bases on which life can be healthfully and 
effectively carried on in northern polar regions through study 
of special problems related to the environment in Alaska. 

The health problems of Alaska are typically those of a fron- 
tier area, characterized by the geographical and social iso- 
lation of its population. In far northern regions, these 
health problems are intensified by climatic factors (princi- 
pally the prolonged low temperatures, and permafrost) and by 
the transitional status of the native population, many of whom 
subsist in a submarginal or hunters' economy. Thorough know- 
ledge of the effect of these factors in relation to problems 
of health and sanitation is basic to the development of prac- 
tical solutions and to the adaptation of methods and services 
adequate to the needs of those living and working in arctic 
and subarctic regions. 

Studies conducted by the AHRC relate to such problems as: 
water supplies; sewage and waste disposal; stream and shell- 
fish sanitation; nutrition; the clinical and epidemiological 
characteristics of illness in arctic and subarctic area; ani- 
mal-borne diseases transmissible to man; the physiological 
processes involved in adjustment to living in arctic and sub- 
arctic environment and applications of physiological know- 
ledge; the probable occurrence of arthropod-borne viruses and 
identification of their vectors; and social and anthropologi- 
cal factors significant to health programs. In conjunction 
with other units of the PHS, the AHRC carries on special stud- 
ies, such as the trial study of chemoprophylaxis for tubercu- 
losis in native villages, and the design and testing of exper- 
imental housing for low temperature areas. The AHRC maintains 
close liaison with the Alaska Department of Health, and Welfare 
in order to keep abreast of current health conditions and prob- 
lems needing special study. 

PHS Act, as amended, particularly sections 301, 3H> 3^1 
(42 USC 2kl, 2^3, 264). 

Appropriation-Environmental Health Sciences, PHS. 



ADVISORY 
GROUP 



Arctic Health Research Center Advisory Committee 



11-166 



Arctic Health Research Center — Statistical Summary 
DIRECTOR OF PROGRAM: Dr. A. B. Colyar, Director 



ORGANIZATION (June 30, 1964) 

Unit 
Entomology Section 
Environmental San. Section 
Epidemiology Section 



Employees Unit 

1 Nutrition § Met. Dis. Sec. 

19 Physiology Section 

21 Zoonotic Disease Section 



Employees 

7 



14 



PERSONNEL (As of June 30) 

Paid employment 
Outside D. C. area 



1960 



1961 



1962 



1963 



1964 



49 
49 


48 
48 


59 
59 


62 
62 


62 
62 



FUNDS (Eiscal year) 

Total available 

Appropriation 

Other funds 
Funds available for : 

Direct operations 

Direct construction 



1960 



1961 



1962 



1963 1964 1965 (Est.) 



$554 
487 


1 
$580 
510 


In thousands) 
$754 $816 
682 757 


$1,360 
1,345 


$4,623 
4,573 


67 


70 


72 59 


15 


50 


554 


580 


754 816 


860 


833 


• • • 


• • • 


• • • • • • 


500 


3,790 



PROGRAM STATISTICS (Alaska) 
Total population 
Civilian population (000) 
Birth rate (per 1000 pop.) 
Death; rate (per 1000 pop.) 
Infant mortality (per 1000 
registered births) 



- 


- 


242.0 


246.6 


192.0 


204.0 


209.0 


213.6 


33.2 


32.3 


31.7 


31.1 


5.6 


5.4 


5.4 


5.4 


40.7 


36.6 


34.3 


32.0 



11-167 



Division of Environmental Engineering and Food Protection 

PROGRAM To improve and protect public health through environmental 
OBJECTIVES measures relating to milk and food, shellfish, public and 
private water supply, shelter, solid waste disposal, com- 
munity sanitation, community environmental planning and 
development, and control of environmental sanitation on 
interstate carriers - airlines, railroads, buses and ves- 
sels. 

EXTENT OF Problems in environmental health have become more dynamic 
PROBLEM and difficult to manage because of increasingly rapid tech- 
nological changes and metropolitan area expansion. One of 
the major public health problems today is assuring that milk, 
shellfish and foods are free of disease producing organisms 
and other contaminants. To safeguard the health of one and 
a half million travelers on interstate carriers each day re- 
quires supervision of the construction, maintenance, and op- 
eration of some 5,000 conveyances and the approval and certi- 
fication of 4,100 sources and suppliers of water, milk and 
food. The annual installation of approximately 300,000 indi- 
vidual sewage disposal systems in suburban and rural areas 
creates both community and personal health problems. Refuse 
disposal facilities are inadequate in 90 percent of the 
9,000 communities with populations over 1,000. 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



The Division assists States and local agencies in maintain- 
ing and improving the community environment through preven- 
tion and control of conditions harmful to public health. 
These activities include planning, conducting, and coordi- 
nating national programs in environmental engineering, in- 
cluding milk, food, and shellfish sanitation, interstate 
carrier sanitation, general community sanitation, public and 
private water supply, and environmental health planning in 
metropolitan areas; conducting research, investigations, dem- 
onstrations, and training; administering a research grants 
program; providing consultation and technical services to 
other Federal, interstate, State and local agencies, and to 
private industries and organizations; developing program 
guides, model codes, ordinances, and standards. 

PHS Act, as amended, particularly Sec. 301, 3H> 3l4, 3^1 
(42 USC 24l, 243, 246, 264). 



SOURCE OF 
FUNDS 



Appropriation 
tion, PHS 



Milk, Food, Interstate and Community Sanita- 



ADVIS0RY Advisory Committee on Revision of Drinking Water Standards; 

GROUPS Joint Committee on Railroad and Airline Sanitation, Joint 

Committee on Rural Sanitation; Technical Committee on Plumb- 
ing Standards; Inter-agency Committee on Sewage and Waste 
Disposal from Vessels, other PHS program advisory groups. 



11-168 



Division of Environmental Engineering and Food Protection — Statistical summary 



DIVISION CHIEF 1 : Wesley E. 


Gilbertson 














ORGANIZATION (June 30, 


1964) 
















Unit 


Employees 


Unit 




Employees 




Office of the Chief 


45 




Interstate Carrier 


66 






Research Grants 


9 




Special Engineering 


20 






Milk and Food Sanitation 


88 




Metropolitan Planning 








Shellfish Sanitation 


110 




and Development 


15 
























PERSONNEL (as of June 30) 


1959!/ 


196oi/ 


1961 


19622/ 


1963 


1964 






Paid employment 


427 


484 


259 


284 


314 


353 






In D. C. area 


91 


116 


87 


79 


"85 


91 






Outside D. C. area 


336 


368 


172 


205 


229 


262 
























FUNDS (fiscal year) 


1959!/ 


196oi/ 


196l 


19622/ 


1963 


1964 


1965 (Est. 


) 




(in 


thousands ) 












Total available 


$4,505 


$4,723 


$2,315 


$7,849 


$7,991 


$9,315 


$9,339 




Appropriation 


4,320 


4,606 


2,150 


7,59a 


7,766 


9,0b2 


9,123 




Other funds 


185 


117 


165 


251 


225 


233 


216 




Funds available for: 


















Direct Operations 


4,139 


^587 


2,315 


2,969 


3,982 


4,57^ 


4,432 




Direct Construction 











1,570 


30 


21 







Grants: 


















Research 











3,310 


3,979 


4,720 


^,907 




Projects 


366 


287 



















1/ Prior to 196l, figures 


include 


resources for Division of Air Pollution 






2/ Includes figures for construction and operation of 2 shellfish 


sanitation 




research centers 




































PROGRAM STATISTICS 




1958 


1959 


i960 


1961 


1962 


1963 




Construction-Plan Review 




2,498 


2,0S0 


2,791 


3,004 


2,382 


1,495 




Dining Cars in Operation 




1,625 


1,358 


1,326 


1,120 


1,104 


1,079 




Dining cars inspected 




820 


916 


965 


1,049 


1,019 


986 




Vessels in Operation 




2,096 


2,207 


2,046 


1,904 


1,829 


1,830 




Vessles inspected 




775 


843 


982 


935 


864 


927 




Caterers and Commissaries 




389 


388 


403 


422 


4l3 


^35 




Inspections 




285 


362 


37^ 


403 


371 


399 




Water and Food Sources 




^,537 


4,483 


4,515 


4,442 


4,423 


4,12"0 




Inspections 




571 


677 


968 


1,889 


1,880 


3,895 




Refuse sanitation; current 


; estimate 430,000 tons/day 










Community incinerators 




294 


300 


325 


350 


350 


375 




Community Sanitary landfills 


1,350 


1,400 


1,475 


1,500 


1,525 


1,550 




Septic Tank Sewerage Systems 


50,500 


51,700 


52,800 


53,900 


55,000 


56,000 




Population served (000) 


















Interstate Milk Shipper Certification 














Shipping States Participating 


35 


36 


36 


39 


42 


^3 




Shippers listed 




586 


676 


745 


79^ 


890 


979 




Daterstate Shellfish Shipper Certification 














Producing States Participating 


22 


22 


22 


22 


22 


22 




Shippers listed 




1,500 


1,600 


1,650 


1,650 


1,440 


1,450 




Research Grants Approved 




20 


48 


106 


142 


179 


203 




Amount Awarded (000) 




295 


716 


1,539 


2,5^8 


3,310 


3,979 





11-169 



Environmental Health Sciences - (excluding Arctic Health Research Center) 

PROGRAM The Environmental Health Science program is directed with 
OBJECTIVES planning and implementing an integrated program of research 
aimed at producing scientific information and developing 
methods which have general applicability to categorical en- 
vironmental health programs. The area of most immediate con- 
cern is the development of more finite information on the 
distribution of chemical environmental contaminants and the 
effects on human health. 



EXTENT OF 
PROBLEM 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



LEGAL 
BASIS 

SOURCES OF 
FUNDS 



Over the past several decades new chemical products, parti- 
cular agricultural chemicals, have been introduced at a rate 
which far exceeds our ability to fully understand their long 
term toxic effects on humans or the manner in which they are 
distributed in the environment. Effective control of these 
chemical contaminants requires detailed and long term invest- 
igation into these and related problems. 

Current activities involve planning, organizing, and obtain- 
ing staff and facilities for (l) a program of basic and 
applied research in environmental toxicology and related 
disciplines, and (2) the conduct of a national program di- 
rected toward the detection, assessment, control and reduc- 
tion of potentially harmful exposures of man to pesticides. 

PHS Act, as amended, particularly Sec. 301, 311, 3lk 
{k2 USC 2*1-1, 2k3, 2k6). 

Appropriation - Environmental Health Sciences, PHS. 



ADVISORY National Advisory Environmental Health Committee, Environ- 
GROUPS mental Health Training Committee . 



11-170 



Environmental Health Sciences — Statistical Summary 

DIRECTOR OF PROGRAM (Acting) : Earl H. Arnold 

ORGANIZATION : (June 30, 1964) 

Unit Employees 
Environmental Health Sciences research 15 
Office of Resources Development 12 



PERSONNEL (as of June 30) 1963 1964 

Paid employment 

In D. C. area 

Outside D. C. area 



7 
7 


27 
25 





2 



FUNDS (fiscal year) 1963 1964 1965Est . 

(in thousands) 

Total available $ 1,273 II $ 3,537 $ 8,626 

Appropriation 1,273 3,490 8,562 

Other funds - 47 64 
Funds available for : 

Direct operations 57 410 3,286 
Grants : 

Research - 1,608 3,078 

Training 1,216 1,519 2,262 



PROGRAM STATISTICS 

Number of research grants awarded 23 

Number of training grants awarded 36 



1/ $1,216,000 for training grants transferred from National Institutes of 
Health, and $57,000 for the Office of Resources Development transferred 
from other environmental health appropriations. 



11-171 



PROGRAM 
OBJECTIVES 



EXTENT OF 
PROBLEM 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



LEGAL 
BASIS 

SOURCE OF 
FUNDS 

ADVISORY 
GROUPS 



Division of Occupational Health 

To protect and improve the health of the working population 
by cooperating with health and labor departments, management, 
and labor in preventing and controlling occupational diseases 
and health hazards and by promoting the provision of preven- 
tive health services to employees. 

The effects of occupation on health, and of health on produc- 
tivity are of great significance; yet, of the 56 million wage 
and salary workers in industries, less than 15 million work 
in establishments with an in-plant health service, i.e., 
physician and/or nurse to provide health services to employees. 
Identification of occupationally related disease is often dif- 
ficult and mechanisms for reporting their incidence and prev- 
alence are inadequate. The total employed civilian labor force 
averages about 70 million persons yearly, of whom 68 million 
are in non-agricultural pursuits. Absence due to sickness is 
estimated at 400 million man days per year, or more than 8 
billion dollars in wage costs. Nsw occupational health prob- 
lems are arising constantly due to rapid technological change 
in modern industry. Growing problems in health as related to 
occupation are also associated with age composition changes 
in the labor force. Trained people required in occupational 
health are in short supply. The technical information avail- 
able must be collected, disseminated and utilized. 

Conduct clinical, environmental, and toxicological research 
studies, supplemented by field investigations, of occupational 
factors affecting health of workers; provide technical and con- 
sultative assistance to State and local health and labor de- 
partments; encourage development of employee health services 
and other health conservation and preventive health programs; 
publish technical reports, handbooks, and reviews relating to 
occupational health; provide specialized training of State, 
local, and industrial health personnel; cooperate with other 
governmental agencies interested in the health, safety and 
welfare of workers; provide, through the Occupational Health 
Information Exchange, a facility for the exchange of informa- 
tion on the hazards of industrial products and processes and 
the methods for their control. 

PHS Act, as amended, particularly Sec. 301, 311, 31^ (^2 USC 
2kl, 2^3, 2k6). 

Appropriation - Occupational Health, PHS 



Advisory Committee to the Surgeon General on Occupational 
Health 



11-172 



OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH 



-STATISTICAL SUMMARY 



DIRECTOR OF PROGRAM : Dr. Murray C. Brown 

ORGANIZATION (June 30, 1964) 

Unit Employees 

Headquarters Personnel 57 

Occupational Health Research & Training Facility, Cincinnati, Ohio 144 
Occupational Health Field Station, Salt Lake City, Utah 19 



PERSONNEL (as of June 30) 

Paid employment 
In D.C. area 
Outside D.C. atea 



1960 

84 
20 
64 



1961 

160 

33 

127 



1962 

183 

48 

135 



1963 

192 

48 

144 



1964 

220 

54 

166 



FUNDS (fiscal year) 

Total Available 
Appropriation 
Other funds 

Funds available for : 
Direct operations 
Grants: Research 



1960 



1961 



1962 



1963 



(in thousands) 
$826 $1,767 $3,947 $4,144 
764 1,721 3,931 4,119 
62 46 16 25 



764 1,767 



2,115 
1,832 



2,378 
1,766 



1964 

$5,062 

5,036 

26 

2,865 
2,197 



1965 (Est. ) 

$5,198 

5,163 

35 

2,893 
2,305 



PROGRAM STATISTICS 1959 1960 1961 1 962 1963 

Employed civilian labor force 
(in millions) 
Nonagri cultural industries 
Agriculture 
States having: 

Full compensation coverage 

for occupational diseases 
Organized occupational 

health program 
Programs with occupational 

health physicians 
Programs with occupational 
health nurses 
Members of professional occupa- 
tional health organizations: 
Ipdustrial Medical Associa- 
tion 3,750 4,000 4,000+ 4,000+ 4,000+ 
American Industrial Hygiene 

Association 1,110 1,200 1,255 1,260 1,324 

American Conference of 
Governmental Industrial 

Hygienists 511 564 590 616 

Number of industrial 
nurses 



65 


66 


67 


67 


69 


58 


60 


61 


61 


64 


7 


6 


6 


6 


5 


31 


31 


32 


32 


32 


41 


42 


42 


42 


42 


17 


18 


18 


18 


21 


19 


19 


19 


19 


19 



655 
16,400 14,200 15,000 16,000 17,000 



11-173 



PROGRAM 
OBJECTIVES 

EXTENT OF 
PROBLEM 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



LEGAL 
BASIS 

SOURCE OF 
FUNDS 



Division of Radiological Health 

To plan, conduct, and coordinate a national program for the 
prevention of radiological hazards to public health. 

The rapid increase in peacetime uses of nuclear energy, in- 
cluding military and industrial use of power reactors, in- 
troduces problems of radiation exposure and radioactive 
waste disposal; the use of radioisotopes and x-rays in medi- 
cal diagnosis and therapy touches all segments of the popu- 
lation. Radioactivity levels from nuclear weapons tests in 
recent years have demonstrated the need to improve nation- 
wide surveillance and studies on methods to reduce and con- 
trol exposure from those sources which are susceptible to 
control. For the most part, health- agencies lack trained 
personnel, equipment, funds, and legislation adequate to 
meet these problems. 

State Assistance : Assist State and local health agencies 
in the development of radiological health programs; conduct 
demonstrations in application of new methods and equipment 
for surveillance and control of health hazards from radia- 
tion. 

Training : Develop a national training program to increase 
the supply of professional personnel serving State, local, 
and Federal agencies, industry and universities. 
Research : Study the biological effects of radiation through 
human epidemiological studies; collate, analyze, and inter- 
pret radiation exposure data and develop control techniques. 
Technical Operations : Conduct nationwide environmental 
monitoring programs. Administer laboratories at Las Vegas, 
Nev., Montgomery, Ala., Rockville, Md., and Winchester, Mass. 
Provide technical laboratory services and training. Admin- 
ister safety programs in conjunction with AEC, Department of 
Defense, and other Federal agencies. 

PHS Act, as amended, particularly Sec. 301, 311, 31^4- (k-2 USC 
2*1-1, 2^3, 2U6); P.L 87-582. 

Appropriation - Radiological Health, PHS. 



ADVISORY National Advisory Committee on Radiation; Committee on Radi- 
GROUPS ation Health Training Grants; Federal Radiation Council. 



11-174 



Division of Radiological Health --Statistical Summary 
DIRECTOR OF PROGRAM: Dr. Donald R. Chadwick 
ORGANIZATION (June 30, 196*0 



Unit 




Employees 










Office of Chief 






103 










Research Branch 






202 










Technical Operations 


Branch 




397 










State Assistance Branch 




161 










Training Branch 






97 










PERSONNEL (as of June 


30) 


i960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 




Paid employment 




304 


U96 


813 


982 


960 




In D.C. area 




112 


193 


315 


411 


426 




Outside D.C. area 




192 


303 


^99 


571 


534 




FUNDS (Fiscal Year) 




i960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 


1965 (est.) 










( in thousands ) 






Total available 




$2,937 


$6,777 


$ll,ll*9 


$16,786 


$20,742 


$21,901 


Appropriations 




2,362 


6,194 


10,320 


15,790 


19, 1)08 


19,601 


Other funds 




575 


583 


829 


996 


1,334 


2,300 


Funds available for: 
















Direct Operations 




2,937 


6,277 


8,951 


11,741 


14,033 


14,779 


Grants 
















Research 








1,198 


1,545 


2,209 


2,122 


Training 






500 


1,000 


2,000 


2,500 


2,500 


State Program Development 






1,500 


2,000 


2,500 


PROGRAM STATISTICS 






i960 


1961 1962 


: 1963 


1964 





Training 

Short Courses (in residence) 
Short Courses (in field) 

TOTAL 
PHS Officers in Full Time 
Graduate Training 

Environmental Monitoring Operations 

Number of Milk Stations 

Number of Air Stations 

Institutional Food Sampling 
Points 
Survey of Dental X-ray Machines 

Number of States 

Number of Machines 
Survey of Medical X-ray Machines 

Number of States 

Number of Machines 
Grants 

Research 

Training 



554 508 751 960 1,044 

1+07 640 3^7 390 536 

90T 1,158 1,098" 1,350 1,580 



24 



32 



25 



19 



26 



36 
45 




60 

45 




60 
62 




60 
62 


63 

74 







9 




20 




20 


44 


9 
6,073 ■ 


24, 


19 
100 

15 


25, 


32 
,000 

67 

20 


67, 


^9 
,000 

74 
30 


48 
74,000 

43 
1+0,000 

98 

46 



II - 175 



Division of Water Supply and Pollution Control 

PROGRAM To maintain a high level of water quality in the Nation's lakes, 
OBJECTIVES streams, tidal and underground waters to permit their repeated 
reuse in meeting rising needs for public and industrial uses, 
for propagation of fish and aquatic life and wildlife, for 
recreation, and for agriculture. 

EXTENT OF The problem of water pollution is national in scope as a direct 
PROBLEM result of population and industrial growth, new and changing 

technology, and new agricultural and other land practices. The 
amounts, kinds and complexity of today's wastes have profound 
effects on water uses, and knowledge for their control lags far 
behind needs. 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



Responsibilities include development of comprehensive programs 
for all drainage basins of the country; enforcement of Federal 
pollution control laws; basic data collection, evaluation, and 
dissemination; direct research; administration of fellowships, 
grants, and contracts for research or training projects and for 
demonstrations; administration of construction grants to munici- 
palities and program grants to State and interstate agencies; 
provision of information and technical assistance to other 
Federal agencies, State and interstate agencies, municipalities 
and industries; training; assistance in control of pollution 
at Federal installations; and studies of the needs for water 
storage in Federal reservoirs to regulate streamflows for water 
quality control. 

Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended (33 USC k66- 
466k); PHS Act, as amended, particularly Sec. 301, 311, 3l4 
(k-2 USC 214-1, 2U3, 246). 



SOURCE OF Appropriation - Water Supply and Water Pollution Control, PHS; 

FUNDS Grants for Waste Treatment Works Construction, PHS; Buildings 
and Facilities, PHS; Reimbursement from Corps of Engineers, 
Bureau of Reclamation, U. S. Study Commissions, Atomic Energy 
Commission, Army Chemical Corps, World Health Organization; 
The Executive Office (Accelerated Public Works) and State 
Department, (American Sections, International Joint Commission.) 

ADVISORY Water Pollution Control Advisory Board; National Technical Task 
GROUPS Committee on Industrial Wastes; Sanitary Engineering Research 
Advisory Committee. 



11-176 



Division of Water Supply and Pollution Control — Statistical Summary 



CHTF.F OF PROGRAM : Gordon E. McCallum 
ORGANIZATION: (June 30, 196*0 



Unit 










Employees 


Office of the Chief 










138 


Basic Data Branch 










103 


Construction Grants Branch 










152 


Enforcement Branch 










276 


Research Branch 










161 


Technical Services Branch 










526 


Research and Training Grant 


s Branch 








17 


Information Branch 










25 
1,398 




PERSONNEL (as of June 30) 


I960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


I96I4- 


Paid employment 


511 


727 


989 


12l4 


1398 


In D. C. area 


120 


156 


203 


229 


252 


Outside D. C. area 


391 


571 


786 


985 


111+6 




FUNDS (fiscal year) i960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


19614- 


1965 (Estimated) 






(in thousands) 




Total available $52,1+25 


$56,0^5 $102,1614- $232,09^ $132,063 $129,051 


Appropriations 51, 857 


55,W3 


101,578 


1214-, 814-7 


125, 


,315 127, 819 


Other funds 568 


597 


586 


107,214-7 


6, 


jl+8 1,232 


Funds available for 












Direct operations l+,52*+ 


6,91+1+ 


11,3^9 


15,531 


17; 


,14-85 22,320 


Grants to states 2,901 


3,000 


i+,8oo 


5,000 


5, 


,000 5,000 


Grants for waste 












treatment 












construction 1+5,000 


14-6,101 


80, 61+5 


90,000 


90 ; 


,000 90,000 


Accelerated Public 












Works 


— 


-- 


106,225 


5,960 


Research grants 


— 


2,670 


3,238 


h. 


,229 5,139 


Fellowship grants 


— 


100 


300 




l4-7lt- 617 


Demonstration grants 


— 


300 


500 




625 1,165 


Training grants 


— 


700 


1,100 


2, 


,000 2,000 


Buildings and 












Facilities 


-- 


1,600 


10,200 


6; 


,290 2,810 




PROGRAM STATISTICS (fiscal 


year) i960 1961 1962 


1963 19614- 


Construction Grants 












WPC (in millions) 


$14-8 


.2 $14-5.2 $614-. 5 


$92.2 $814-. 6 


APW (in millions) 


-- 


- 


- 


— 


14-14-. 8 67.3 



Total grants 
(in millions) 
Estimated total 
project costs 
(in millions) 
Number of projects 



$14-8.2 $14-5.2 $614-. 5 $137-0 $151.9 



$359.2 $21+8.5 $396„7 $623.6 $l+2l+.l 
573 590 75^ 1105 1012 



NOTE: This Division was formed in F. Y. 1959. Data prior to F. Y, 1959 included 
in statistics of Division of Sanitary Engineering Services (now Division 
of Environmental Engineering and Food Protection.) 



11-177 



National Institutes of Health 

BUREAU The National Institutes of Health constitutes the principal Federal 
RESPONSI- agency engaged in the conduct and support of medical and health- 
BILITIES related research. 



SCOPE OF 
ACTIVITIES 



Its mission is to conduct both fundamental and clinical research 
aimed at the conquest of disease and the improvement of human health 
and to support similar research at universities, medical schools, 
and other institutions; to provide support to those institutions for 
the development of research training, and to lend support to appli- 
cants eligible to pursue a research career or to undertake further 
studies in all fields essential to the advancement of health through 
research; to aid in the construction of research facilities; and to 
facilitate the dissemination of information and the application of 
new knowledge to advance the health of the American people. 

The Nationallnstitutes of Health is one of the largest research 
centers in the world, conducting studies on every major medical re- 
search problem within its own laboratories and at the Clinical 
Center. Through the Division of Biologies Standards, NIH is respon- 
sible for administration of controls designed to insure the purity, 
safety, and potency of the Nation's biologicals, and for the conduct 
of research leading to their improvement or to the development of 
new ones that will prevent or control disease. 



Each of the nine Institutes administers a program of research grants 
related to its categorical interests. Research grants and contracts 
made by the nine Institutes and the Division of Research Facilities 
and Resources now support about 40 percent of all medical research 
conducted in this country and also constitute 40 percent of all 
Federal funds for the support of research in universities proper. 
Several programs also provide support for developing resources for 
the future in terms of (1) training scientific and professional man- 
power and (2) strengthening the nation's graduate education and 
research structure by various means including grants for building 
and equipping of research facilities in the health sciences field. 
A program of general research support grants provides funds for the 
strengthening of research and research training programs. In the 
interests of the United States, the National Institutes of Health 
also administers an extensive program of research in foreign countries, 



BUREAU National Institute of Allergy 
PROGRAMS and Infectious Diseases 

National Institute of Arthritis 

and Metabolic Diseases 
National Cancer Institute 
National Institute of Child 

Health and Human Development 
National Institute of Dental 

Research 
National Institute of General 

Medical Sciences 
National Heart Institute 



National Institute of Mental Health 
National Institute of Neurological 

Diseases and Blindness 
Clinical Center 

Division of Biologies Standards 
Division of Research Grants 
Division of Research Facilities 

and Resources 



11-178 



National Institutes of Health — Statistical Summary 

DIRECTOR OF BUREAU: Dr. James A. Shannon 

ORGANIZATION (June 30, 1964) 

Unit Employees 

Office of the Director 177 

Office of International Research 79 

National Cancer Institute 1,257 

National Heart Institute 734 

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases 679 

National Institute of Arthritis and Metabolic Diseases 602 

National Institute of Child Health and Human Development 112 U 

National Institute of Dental Research 261 

National Institute of General Medical Sciences 142 2/ 

National Institute of Mental Health 1,235 

National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Blindness 749 

Clinical Center 1,735 

Division of Biologies Standards 267 

Division of Research Facilities and Resources 135 3/ 

Division of Research Grants 549 

Division of Research Services 1,295 

Office of Administrative Management 1,209 

Total 11,217 



PERSONNEL (as of June 30) 

Paid Employment 
In D.C. area 
Outside D.C. area 



1960 



1961 



1962 



1963 



1964 



8,288 

7,511 

777 


8,970 

8,176 

794 


10,069 

9,331 

738 


10,677 

9,866 

811 


11.217 

10,409 

808 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 


1965 (Est.) 



FUNDS (fiscal year) 

(in thousands) 

Funds available 

Appropriations and other funds534, 736 705, 911^' 890,7671' 961, 33L 6 -'!, 074, 384^' 

Funds available for : 

Direct operations $105,680 129,471 144,306 167,544 184,218 

Direct construction 6,380 19,800 9,106 14,967 



Grants 



429,056 570,060 726,661 784,681 875,199 



NOTE 



l_ Excludes programs in the Bureau of Medical Services and Bureau of State Services, 



_1/ National Institute of Child Health and Human Development established January 30, 1963 

2/ Assigned to Division of General Medical Sciences as of June 30, 1962. The National 

Institute of General Medical Sciences replaced the Division January 30, 1963. 

3/ Division of Research Facilities and Resources established July 15, 1962. 

4/ Includes $509,000 of other funds available. 

_5/ Includes $577,270 of other funds available. 

_6/ Includes $689,935 of other funds available. 

TJ Includes $463,067 of other funds available. 



11-179 



National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases 



PROGRAM To conduct research on human diseases caused by micro-organisms 
OBJECTIVES and by allergic response, and to investigate related fundamental 
problems . 

EXTENT OF The common illnesses that disrupt our daily activities and lower 
PROBLEM our productivity as a Nation are still preponderantly those of 

microbial or allergic origin. Many are so poorly understood that 
we cannot even assemble objective figures on their prevalence. 
For example, upper respiratory infections, including the common 
cold, cost an estimated two billion dollars or more a year in 
lost productivity and medical expenses. Despite impressive gains 
in recent years, many infectious diseases remain unconquered and 
constitute serious problems. The allergic disorders, such as 
asthma and hay fever, also require intensive long-term study. 

PRESENT In the broad area of microbiology, the Institute conducts a 
PROGRAM program of research in its Bethesda laboratories and in several 
SCOPE field stations. In addition, it supports many other projects by 
grants to universities and other research institutions. Some of 
these projects are oriented toward epidemiology, prevention, and 
treatment of selected infectious and parasitic diseases. 

The Institute investigates the role of infections and allergic 
factors in the production of chronic illness. Other studies deal 
with the physiology and biochemistry of the infecting organism 
and with the changes initiated in the host by the infection. 

The Institute conducts a program for developing and testing respira- 
tory virus vaccines. This program is carried out through research 
contracts, with certain responsibilities assigned to intramural 
research units. In addition, the Institute conducts a research 
reference reagents program to develop viral reagents and provide 
them to research laboratories in Bethesda, to laboratories supported 
by grants, and to other active research groups. 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



PHS Act as amended, particularly Sec. 
289a-289c) 



301, 431-433 (42 USC 241, 



SOURCE OF Appropriation - Allergy and Infectious Disease Activities; 
FUNDS General Research and Services, NIH-PHS. 

ADVISORY National Advisory Allergy and Infectious Diseases Council, Board 
GROUPS of Scientific Counselors, Board for Vaccine Development, Board 
for Virus Reference Reagents, Committee on Standardization of 
Allergins, Panel for Arthropod-Borne Viruses, Panel for Picorna- 
viruses, Panel for Respiratory and Related Viruses, two review 
committees. 



II - 1 80 



National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases — -Statistical Summary 
DIRECTOR OF PROGRAM; Dr. Justin M. Andrews 

ORGANIZATION (June 30, 1964) 



Unit 








Employees 


Office of Director 










27 




Extramural Programs Branch 










55 




Collaborative Studies 










21 




Associate Director in Charge of Research 


i 








23 




Rocky Mountain Laboratory 










158 




Laboratory of Infectious Diseases 










104 




Laboratory of Biology of Viruses 










47 




Laboratory of Bacterial Diseases 










7 




Laboratory of Parasite Chemotherapy 










39 




Laboratory of Parasitic Diseases 










36 




Laboratory of Germ-Free Animal Research 










21 




Laboratory of Tropical Virology 










56 




Laboratory of Immunology 










34 




Laboratory of Clinical Investigation 




Tot 


al 




51 
679 




PERSONNEL (as of June 30) 1960 


1961 


1962 




1963 




1964 


Paid employment 559 


603 


649 




664 




679 


In D.C. area 347 


383 


408 




434 




450 


Outside D.C. area 212 


220 


241 




230 




229 


FUNDS (fiscal year) 1961 


1962 

(i 


1963 
n thousand 


s) 


1964 




1965 (Est.) 


Total Available 














Appropriation and other 














funds $44,000 


$54,5731/ 


$64,5491/ 


$67 


,0282/ $6S 


(,962^/ 


Funds available for: 















Direct operations 
Direct construction 
Grants 



8,972 11,903 16,865 17,864 18,674 
750 
35,028 41,920 47,684 49,164 51,288 



PROGRAM STATISTICS 

(fiscal year) 
No. of research papers submitted 
for publication by NIAID Staff 

Inpatient admissions 

(to Clinical Center) 
Outpatient visits 

No. of research grant 

applications: Reviewed — ' 
Approved 
No. of training grant 

applications! Reviewed—' 
Approved 



1960 



276 



1961 



297 



1962 



307 



1963 



368 



1964 (Est.) 



365 



349 


422 


452 


388 


441 


1,360 


1,197 


1,033 


713 


515 


1,610 


2,161 


2,192 


2,267 


2,300 


1,394 


1,883 


1,863 


1,807 


1,800 


158 


139 


155 


168 


180 


127 


127 


150 


163 


170 



1/ Includes $12,000 of other funds available 3/ 
2/ Includes $38,000 of other funds available 

4/ 



II-181 



5/ 



Includes $123,198 of other 

funds available 

Includes $135,00 of other 

funds available 

Includes non-competing continuations 



National Institute of Arthritis & Metabolic Diseases 

PROGRAM To conduct and support basic laboratory research and clinical 
OBJECTIVES investigations intramurally and extramurally, in the various 
arthritides including rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, 
gout and bursitis, collagen diseases such as lupus erythematosus, 
metabolic diseases such as diabetes mellitus and cystic fibrosis, 
dermatology, endocrinology, gastroenterology (including diseases 
of the liver), hematology, nutrition, orthopedics and diseases 
of bone, and urology, including renal diseases; and to expand 
non-Federal research in these areas by training and fellowship 
programs . 

EXTENT OF Rheumatic diseases afflict approximately 12 million Americans, 
PROBLEM disabling an estimated one million. Diseases of the digestive 
system account for some 40 million physician-attended illnesses 
in the United States each year. An estimated three million 
people in the United States have diabetes and about 31,000 die 
of it each year. Cystic fibrosis is one of the most serious 
and common health menaces of childhood. 

PRESENT The basic research program of the Institute encompasses the fields 
PROGRAM of biochemistry, biophysics, enzymology, physiology, medicinal 
SCOPE chemistry, pharmacology, pathology, nutrition (including studies 
with germ- free animals), endocrinology, histology, toxicology, 
photobiology, genetics, and others, as they relate to life processes 
in health and disease. Certain metabolic and nutritional aspects 
of space medicine are also a concern of the Institute. Clinical 
studies are under way on rheumatoid arthritis, gastroenteric dis- 
orders, diabetes, gout, thyroid conditions, osteoporosis, blood 
diseases, growth problems, cystic fibrosis, obesity, systemic 
lupus erythematosus, and other problems. 

The Institute supports a major portion of the arthritis and 
metabolic disease research in universities and hospitals throughout 
the country. Training of research manpower is aided through a 
program of research fellowships to individuals, and training grants 
to institutions for improving their teaching facilities. 

To supplement the activities at Bethesda, the Institute is 
developing and extending relatively new disciplines such as 
epidemiology, biometry, and biochemical and population genetics, 
to the study of metabolic processes and disorders. 

LEGAL BASIS PHS Act, as amended, particularly Sec. 301, 431-433 (42 USC 241, 
289a-289c). 

SOURCE OF Annual Congressional appropriation. 

FUNDS Appropriation - Arthritis and Metabolic Diseases Activities; 
General Research and Services, NIH - PHS. 

ADVISORY National Advisory Arthritis and Metabolic Diseases Council, 
GROUPS Board of Scientific Counselors, Seven Review Committees. 



11-182 



National Institute of Arthritis and Metabolic Diseases — Statistical Summary 
DIRECTOR OF PROGRAM: Dr. G. Donald Whedon 



ORGANIZATION (June 30, 1964) 

Unit 
Office of Director 
Extramural Programs Branch 
Collaborative Studies 

Office of Associate Director in Charge of Research 
Laboratory of Nutrition and Endocrinology 
Laboratory of Biochemistry and Metabolism 
Laboratory of Chemistry 
Laboratory of Experimental Pathology 
Laboratory of Biochemical Pharmacology 
Laboratory of Chemical Biology 
Laboratory of Physical Biology 
Laboratory of Biophysical Chemistry 
Laboratory of Molecular Biology 
Clinical Investigations 



Total 



Employees 
20 

71 , 
30i/ 
20 
46 
41 
64 
47 
29 
17 
58 
23 
41 

95 

6021/ 



PERSONNEL (as of June 30)1/ 

Paid Employment 
In D.C. area 
Outside D.C. area 



1960 

508 

490 

18 



1961 

544 

519 

25 



1962 

602 

580 

22 



1963 

586 

578 

8 



1964 

602 

592 

10 



1963 



1964 



(in thousands) 



FUNDS (fiscal year) 1961 1962 

Total Available 

Appropriations and other funds $61,200 $79,1461/ 100,9781/ 106,050 

Funds available for: 

Direct operations 10,318 12,104 13,193 14,687 

Grants 50,882 67,042 87,785 91,363 



1965 (Est.) 



112,850 

14,945 
97,905 



PROGRAM STATISTICS (fiscal year) 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 (Est.) 
No. of research papers submitted 

for publication by NIAMD staff 417 432 426 366 427 

Inpatient admissions 

(to Clinical Center) 455 450 489 543 542 

Outpatient visits 1,651 1,624 2,070 2,150 2,226 
No. of research grant 

applications: Reviewed 4 -/ 2,093 2,832 3,346 3,611 3,600 

Approved 1,768 2,399 2,756 3,003 3,000 

No. of training grant 

applications: Reviewed 4 -/ 283 329 288 361 380 

Approved 261 308 259 337 340 



1/ Includes Interdepartmental Committee on Nutritional Defense 
2/ Includes $391,000 of other funds available 
3/ Includes $ 89,000 of other funds available 
4/ Includes non-competing continuations 

II-183 



National Cancer Institute 

PROGRAM To conduct investigations relating to the cause, diagnosis, and 
OBJECTIVES treatment of cancer; to support and foster similar research 

activities by other agencies; and to promote the coordination 

of their results. 



EXTENT OF 
PROBLEM 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



LEGAL 
BASIS 

SOURCE OF 
FUNDS 

ADVISORY 
GROUPS 



Cancer is second only to heart disease as the leading cause 
of death in the United States. Fifty years ago the cancer 
death rate was 74 per 100,000 papulation; whereas, today it 
is approximately 125. This year 290,000 persons will die, 
830,000 will be treated, and 540,000 cases will be newly diag- 
nosed. Two factors — increased life expectancy, and wider de- 
tection and diagnosis of cancer—account for the greater part 
of this increase. The economic burden of cancer— the loss of 
50,000 man-years of productivity per year— makes it a foremost 
public health problem. 

Intramural research by the Institute staff covers virtually 
every approach to the cancer problem in the fields of bio- 
chemistry, biology, radiation, chemotherapy, epidemiology, en- 
docrinology, physiology, pathology, and clinical investigations. 
Research on the causation of cancer is now the focus of intra- 
mural investigations in virology, carcinogenesis and epidemiology. 
Over 80 percent of the Institute's funds support, by grants and 
contracts, outside research. Research contracts are employed 
as an extension of the intramural research activities, particu- 
larly the Institute's research effort in chemotherapy, virology 
and carcinogenesis. 

A scientific directorate composed of the Institute's senior 
staff has been established to advise the Director on research 
and research related problems, to coordinate operations, and 
to review contract proposals. In addition, two task forces 
have been launched, composed of NCI staff and outside researchers, 
to investigate (1) viruses as a cause of human cancer and (2) 
treatment of acute leukemia patients. 

PHS Act, as amended, particularly Sec. 301 and Title IV, Part A 
(42 USC 241 and 281-286; current HEW Appropriation Act.) 



Appropriation - National Cancer Institute; 
Services, NIH-PHS. 



General Research and 



National Advisory Cancer Council, Board of Scientific Counselors. 
One review committee. 



11-184 



National Cancer Institute -- Statistical Summary 



DIRECTOR OF PROGRAM; Dr. K. M. Endicott 
ORGANIZATION (June 30, 1964) 



Unit 


Employees 


Unit 


Employees 


Office of the Director 


68 


Laboratory of Chemical 


30 


Grants & Training Branch 


79 


Pharmacology 




Field Studies 


212 


Laboratory of Pathology 


70 


Collaborative Research 


144 


Surgery Branch 


25 


Office of Intramural Research 


147 


Endocrinology Branch 


36 


Diagnostic Research Branch 


40 


Dermatology Branch 


15 


Laboratory of Biochemistry 


64 


Metabolism Service 


32 


Laboratory of Biology 


61 


General Medicine Branch 


36 


Laboratory of Viral Oncology 


80 


Pathologic Anatomy Branch 


47 


Laboratory of Physiology 


62 


Radiation Branch 


9 






Total 


1,257 


PERSONNEL (as of June 30) U 


1960 


1961 1962 1963 


1964 


Paid Employment 


1,164 


1,217 1,291 1,257 


1,257 


In D.C. area 


952 


1,061 1,156 1,117 


1,170 


Outside D.C. area 


212 


156 135 140 


87 


FUNDS (fiscal year) 


1961 


1962 1963 1964 
(in thousands) 


1965 (Est.) 


Total available 









Appropriations 
and other funds 

Funds available for; 
Direct operations 
Direct construction 
Grant s 



$105,756 $123,981-^ 138,002^ 136,035^ 140, 016^ 



46,673 51,679 58,895 62,509 65,434 



62,083 72,302 79,107 73,526 74,582 



PROGRAM STATISTICS (fiscal year) 1960 
No. of research papers submitted 
for publication by NCI Staff 474 
Inpatient admissions 

(to Clinical Center) 
Outpatient visits 
No. of research grant 

applications^-' - Reviewed 
- Approved 

No. of training grant 

applications^.' - Reviewed 



827 
5,019 

2,055 
1,747 



- Approved 



208 
203 



1961 

428 

923 
4,796 

2,177 
1,830 

5.05 

498 



1962 

495 

1,010 
5,956 

2,375 
1,868 

251 
223 



1963 

556 

1,013 
6,963 

2,407 
1,950 

244 
227 



1964 (Est.) 

604 

995 
8,438 

2,400 
2,000 

260 
250 



1/ Excludes allocation to Veteran's Administration. 

2/ Includes $4,000 of other funds available and $5,000,000 for Cancer Research 

Facility (Grants). 
3/ Includes $12,000 of other funds available. 
4/ Includes $204,218 of other funds available 

5/ Includes $10,000 of other funds available. 
6/ Includes non-competing continuations. 

11-185 



National Institute of Child Health and Human Development 

PROGRAM To foster and support research and training related to maternal 
OBJECTIVES health, child health, and human development, including research 
and training in the special health problems of mothers and chil- 
dren and in the basic sciences related to processes of human 
growth and development, including prenatal development. 

EXTENT OF Some 70,000 pregnancies result in stillbirths each year, and 
PROBLEM more than 110,000 American children die before their first 
birthday. Many of these early deaths are associated with 
defective development or premature birth. Mental retardation, 
congenital malformations, physical and psychological handicaps 
and other developmental defects of growth and behavior are 
significant problems to children, their parents, and society. 
The processes of maturation and aging, continuing throughout 
the span of human life, are little understood and need much 
fuller investigation. 

PRESENT The Institute, which was established in January, 1963, fosters 
PROGRAM positively the opportunity for investigators from a broad range 
SCOPE of scientific disciplines, in universities and research centers, 
to study and to conduct research in eight program areas. Four 
of these deal with the life span: Reproductive Biology, Peri- 
natal Biology, Growth and Development, and Aging. Four more 
deal with specific health problems: Congenital Malformations, 
Mental Retardation, Developmental Pharmacology, and Human 
Communications. 

The formal transfer of approximately nine hundred research 
grants, training grants, and research career awards from the 
eight other institutes was accomplished during the year, as 
was the selection of new grants and awards for Institute support, 
The Institute currently administers an extramural program con- 
sisting of approximately 1,000 projects or awards amounting 
to $30,000,000. 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



The Mental Retardation Facilities Construction Act of 1963 
(PL-188-164) authorized the Institute to mount, in coopera- 
tion with the Division of Research Facilities and Resources, 
an extensive program of support for the construction of several 
centers for research on mental retardation and related aspects 
of human development. 

PHS Act, as amended, particularly Sec. 301, 441,443-445 (42 USC 
289d, 289f-289h) 



SOURCE OF Annual Congressional Appropriation - Child Health and Human 

FUNDS Development; General Research and Services, NIH-PHS. 

ADVISORY National Advisory Child Health and Human Development Council, 

GROUPS two review committees. 



11-186 



National Institute of Child Health and Human Development — Statistical Summary 

DIRECTOR OF PROGRAM; Dr. Robert A. Aldrich 
ORGANIZATION (June 30, 1964) 



Unit 

Office of the Director and Associate Director 
Program Planning and Analysis Branch 
Extramural Programs Branch 
Technical Communications Branch 



Total 



Employees 

41 
32 
29 
10 
112 



PERSONNEL 1/ 

Paid Employment 
In D.C. area 
Outside D.C. area 



1962 



1963 



1964 



112 

112 





FUNDS (fiscal year) 1/ 

Total available 

Appropriation 
Funds Available Fort 

Direct operations 

Grants 



1962 



1963 



1964 



1965 (Est.) 



$33,556,000 $42,691,000 



1,394,000 
32,162,000 



3,785,000 
38,906,000 



PROGRAM STATISTICS - 



1/ 



1962 



1963 



1964 (Est.) 



No. Research grant 



applications: Reviewed — 
Approved 



2/ 



1,400 
1,100 



No. Training grant 



applications: Reviewed—' 
Approved 



2/ 



30 
15 



1/ Personnel, funds, and program statistics for 1962 and 1963 are included 
in the National Institute of General Medical Sciences Statistical summary. 



2/ Includes non-competing continuations. 



11-187 



National Institute of Dental Research 

PROGRAM To conduct, assist, foster, and support research in the causes, 
OBJECTIVES prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases and abnormal 
conditions of the mouth and associated structures; to provide 
training and help meet needs for facilities to further such 
research activities; to promote the coordination of investigations 
of the Institute and similar researches by others. 



EXTENT OF 
PROBLEM 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



Oral diseases are among the most prevalent of all diseases of 
mankind. Dental caries affects 95 percent of the population of 
the United States, and more than 90 percent of children of school 
age. One child in ten has some form of malocclusion, and one in 
700 is born with cleft lip or palate. Periodontal disease is the 
main cause of tooth loss in adults. The treatment of oral dis- 
eases places a heavy burden on our population, with dental care 
costing one of every six dollars spent for health services. 

The Institute conducts research in the broad areas of dental 
caries, peridental disease, oral-systemic relationships, and 
abnormalities of growth and development affecting the oral 
cavity, face, and head. Related to these studies is a wide 
range of basic and clinical research in such areas as genetic 
influences on oral health and disease; biochemical and histo- 
logical evaluations of function as related to normal and abnormal 
tissues; epidemiological aspects of disease in the aged and chroni- 
cally ill; and the utilization of research tools including germ- 
free techniques and electron and X-ray microscopy. 

The Institute's extramural program includes the support of (1) 
research projects and programs by scientists and (2) fellowships 
to support training of scholars for research careers and to 
establish career opportunities for scientists; and training grants 
to assist public and non-profit institutions to establish and 
improve training opportunities. 

PHS Act, as amended, particularly Sec. 301, 421-424 (42 USC 241, 
288-288c) 



SOURCE OF Appropriation - National Institute of Dental Research; General 
FUNDS Research Services, NIH-PHS. 

ADVISORY National Advisory Dental Research Council, Board of Scientific 
GROUPS Counselors, Committee on Adhesive Restorative Dental Materials, 
NIDR Committee for Research Manpower, two review committees. 

RECENT In order to provide centralized responsibility for the conduct of 
CHANGES over-all programs of clinical dental research and related patient 

care, the formation of a dental services branch was approved during 
fiscal year 1964. Administratively, the branch was established 
as of July 1, 1964. 



11-188 



National Institute of Dental Research — Statistical Summary 
DIRECTOR OF PROGRAM; Dr. Francis A. Arnold 
ORGANIZATION (June 30, 1964) 



Unit 










Employees 




Office of the Director 












19 




Extramural Programs Branch 










39 




Office of the Associate 


Director 








30 




Laboratory of Biochemistry 










38 




Laboratory of Microbiology 










37 




Laboratory of Histology 


and 


Pathology 






24 




Epidemiology and Biometry Branch 








14 




Clinical Investigations 


Branch 








60 












Total 


261 




PERSONNEL (as of June 30) 




1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 


Paid employment 






163 


192 


241 


249 


261 


In D.C. area 






150 


188 


236 


244 


257 


Outside D.C. area 






13 


4 


5 


5 


4 


FUNDS (fiscal year) 






1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 


1965 (Est.) 












(in thousands) 




Total available 
















Appropriations and 














2/ 
$20,085- 


other funds 




$13 


,472 


$13,159 


$17,767 


$19,140 


Funds available fort 
















Direct operations 




3 


,365 


3,232 


3,789 


4,575 


4,782 


Grants 




10 


,107 


9,727 


13,978 


14,565 


15,303 


PROGRAM STATISTICS 






1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 (Est.) 



(fiscal year) 

No. of research papers 

submitted for publication 

by NIDR Staff 

Inpatient admissions 



122 



98 



101 



145 



179 



(to Clinical Center) 


31 


44 


56 


52 


66 


Outpatient visits 


2,547 


2,571 


7,686 


9,132 


7,497 


No. of research grant 
applications: Reviewed^' 












504 


525 


608 


587 


600 


Approved 


367 


398 


419 


484 


500 


Training grant 1 , 
applications: Reviewed— 












60 


103 


114 


142 


110 


Approved 


52 


101 


103 


125 


100 



_1/ Includes non-competing continuations 
2/ Includes $2,000 of ether funds available 



II-189 



National Institute of General Medical Sciences 



PROGRAM To foster, support, and coordinate research and research training 
OBJECTIVES in areas providing a common basis for understanding a wide range 
of disease and health problems in the general or basic medical 
sciences and related natural and behavioral sciences, as well as 
in multidisciplinary research areas having significance for two 
or more institutes or are outside the general area of responsibility 
of any other institute. 

EXTENT OF The importance of these programs stems primarily from the fact 
PROBLEM that new basic research findings must be fed continually into 
the reservoir of fundamental scientific knowledge if sustained 
productivity in the more applied aspects of medical and biological 
research is to be expected. 

PRESENT Research in the basic medical, biological, preclinical and clinical 
PROGRAM sciences in institutions throughout this country and in some insti- 
SCOPE tutions abroad is supported by research project grants; a nation- 
wide program of research training in many of the basic disciplines 
and clinical sciences is supported in medical schools, graduate 
schools and other institutions; special training in the biomedical 
and related sciences is supported through predoctoral, postdoctoral, 
and special fellowship awards; and opportunities for following a 
full-time career in medical and biological research are provided 
by research career and research career development awards. 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



PHS Act, as amended, particularly Sec. 
289c-289h) 



301, 442-445 (42 USC 241, 



SOURCE OF 
FUNDS 



Appropriation - General Research and Services, NIH-PHS 



ADVISORY National Advisory General Medical Sciences Council, fifteen 
GROUPS review committees. 



11-190 



National Institute of General Medical Sciences — Statistical Summary A/ 
DIRECTOR OF PROGRAM: Dr. Frederick L. Stone 
ORGANIZATION (June 30, 1964) 



Unit 


anch 




Total 


Employees 
29 
12 
41 
37 
23 
142 








Office of Director 
Program Analysis Branch 
Research Grants Branch 
Research Training Grants Br, 
Research Fellowships Branch 




PERSONNEL (as of June 30) 

Paid employment 
In D. C. area 
Outside D. C. area 


1960 

97 

97 




1961 

122 

122 




1962 

178 

178 




19631/ 

172 

172 




1964 

142 

142 






FUNDS (fiscal year) 

Total available 

Appropriations 
Funds available for: 


1961 

$80,930 

1,818 
79,112 


1962 

$82,585 

1,928 
80,657 


19632/ 1964 
(in thousands) 

$104,641 $107,487 

3,306 3,467 
101,335 104,020 


1965 

$114,418 

3,140 
111,278 


(Est 


.) 


Direct operations 
Grants 




PROGRAM STATISTICS 


1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 


(Est, 


.) 



No. of research papers 
submitted for publication 
by DGMS Staff 
No. of research grant 
applications: Reviewed — ' 
Approved 

Training grant 
applications: Reviewed^.' 
Approved 



1,759 
1,396 



539 
442 



2,231 
1,721 



674 
576 



45 

2,702 
2,131 



854 
747 



40 

2,913 
2,420 

857 
790 



2,900 
2,400 



800 
620 



1/ Division of General Medical Science obtained institute status 
on January 30, 1963. 

2/ Excludes Division of Research Facilities and Resources, established 
July 15, 1962. 

.3/ Includes non- competing continuations. 



11-191 



National Heart Institute 



PROGRAM To discover fundamental causes, find effective treatments, 
OBJECTIVES and promote application of existing and newly acquired 

knowledge toward the prevention and cure of diseases of 

the heart and circulation. 

EXTENT OF Heart and circulatory diseases are the principal cause of 
PROBLEM death and a foremost cause of chronic illness. 

PRESENT The National Heart Institute supports and conducts heart 
PROGRAM research and training, and encourages the timely transmittal 
SCOPE of research findings between investigators and to the prac- 
titioner for application to the patient. Its program has 
four components: Institute research, support of research 
and training, epidemiology and biometrics, and the develop- 
ment, exchange, and application of scientific information. 

Institute research is conducted into the causes, prevention, 
diagnosis, and treatment of heart disease through laboratory, 
laboratory-clinical, and clinical studies. 

Cardiovascular research in universities and hospitals through- 
out this country and in some institutions abroad is supported 
by Institute research project grants. Research training is 
aided through training grants, career awards, and research 
fellowships . 

Additional programs include epidemiological investigations, 
geographic disease studies, the collection and dissemination 
of heart information, and the stimulation and coordination of 
a program of artificial organ development. Related activities 
include biometrics research and statistical services for all 
phases of Institute activities. 

The functions and responsibilities for the Heart Disease Con*- 
trol Program was transferred to the Bureau of State Services. 
An Associate Director for Program Planning and Scientific 
Information was appointed, and staff activities in stimu- 
lation and coordination of nation-wide efforts in research 
and development of artificial organs, including the heart, 
kidneys, and lungs, were initiated. 

LEGAL PHS Act, as amended, particularly Sec. 301, 314, 411-414 (42 
BASIS USC 241, 246, 287, et. seq.) 

SOURCE OF Appropriation - National Heart Institute; General Research 
FUNDS and Services, NIH-PHS. 

ADVISORY National Advisory Heart Council, Board of Scientific Counselors, 
GROUPS Erythropoietin Committee, two review committees. 



11-192 



National Heart Institute — Statistical Summary 

DIRECTOR OF PROGRAM; Dr. Ralph E. Knutti 
ORGANIZATION (June 30, 1964 

Unit Employees Unit Employees 

Office of Director 30 Lab. of Technical Development 22 

Office, Die Intramural Research 18 Cardiology Branch 45 

Lab. of Biochemistry 47 Clinical Endocrinology Branch 26 

Lab. of Cardiovascular Physiology 20 Experimental Therapeutics Branch 16 

Lab. of Chemical Pharmacology 35 Gerontology Branch 82 

Lab. of Clinical Biochemistry 36 Surgery Branch 32 

Lab. of Kidney & Electrolyte Metabolism 36 Collaborative Studies 98 

Lab. of Metabolism 43 Training Activities 18 

Heart Information 25 Extramural Programs 105 



Total 734 



PERSONNEL (as of June 30) 1960 1961 1962 1963 i%4~" 

Paid employment 590 584 632 698 734 

In D.C. area 466 452 489 551 ~583 

Outside D.C. area 124 132 143 147 151 



FUNDS (fiscal year) 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 (Est.) 

(in thousands) 
Total available 

Appropriations and other funds $81,047 93,0201/ 118,92a 2 -/ 118,68s 3 -/ 124,818^/ 
Funds available fori 

Direct operations 10,324 12,138 14,195 16,461 16,515 

Direct construction 1,000 

Grants 70,723 79,882 104,725 102,224 108,303 

PROGRAM STATISTICS (fiscal year) 1960 1961 .1962 1963 _1%4 (Est.) 
No. of research papers submitted 

for publication by NHI Staff 437 452 470 478 386 
Inpatient admissions 

(to Clinical Center) 1,094 1,037 1,029 1,077 1,067 

Outpatient visits 2,755 2,666 2,900 3,050 2,'914 
No. of research grant 

applications: Reviewed 1/ 2,293 2,700 3,031 3,210 3,200 

Approved 1,934 2,259 2,511 2,668 2^700 
No. of training grant 

applications: Reviewed — / 353 400 394 391 38O 

Approved 335 375 375 374 370 



1/ Includes $18,000 of other funds available. 

2/ Includes $2,000 of other funds available. 

3/ Includes $3,559 of other funds available. 

4/ Includes $6,000 of other funds available. 

_5/ Includes non-competing continuations. 



II - 193 



National Institute of Mental Health 

PROGRAM To provide more knowledge of the causes, treatment, and preven- 
OBJECTIVES tion of mental disorders; expand the national mental health man- 
power pool through training; develop methods of treatment, pre- 
vention and control, and stimulate their application; assist in 
providing facilities for comprehensive mental health services 
at the community level; improve public understanding of mental 
illness and collect and disseminate scientific and technical 
information regarding mental illness and health. 

EXTENT OF Mental health patients occupy nearly half of all hospital beds 
PROBLEM in the Nation; an estimated 18 million persons suffer from some 
form of mental illness; costs of mental illness are approxi- 
mately $3 billion; services available to the mentally ill are 
on a lower level than those available to the physically ill; 
the Nation faces the task of raising the level of mental health 
services. 

PRESENT The Institute is the focal point of leadership and coordination 
PROG-RAM for the total mental health program of the Public Health Service. 
SCOPE It conducts and supports interdisciplinary basic, clinical, and 
developmental research on the etiology, prevention, and treat- 
ment of mental illness and the improvement of mental, health and 
collects, analyzes, interprets, and disseminates information on 
mental health. Training and fellowship grants for research and 
service in the mental health disciplines provide support at the 
graduate and undergraduate level, for general practitioners, 
and for supporting personnel. Demonstrations, consultation and 
technical services to the States and communities develop and 
demonstrate methods of care, and grants-in-aid to States and 
territories assist in developing plans to expand and improve 
mental health programs. Construction of community mental health 
centers is supported through matching grants. 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



The Institute was reorganized to increase its capacity to imple- 
ment new and expanding programs. The Community Mental Health 
Facilities Branch was established to administer NIMH responsi- 
bilities under the Community Mental Health Centers Act of 19^3 • 

The National Mental Health Act of July 3, 19^6; PHS Act, as 
amended, particularly Sec. 301, 303,3l4(c), ^3l(b), V32- V33 
(h-2 USC 2^1, 2^2a, 2U6, 289a-289c). 



SOURCE OF Appropriation - Mental Health Activities; General Research and 
FUNDS Services, NIH-PHS. 

ADVISORY The National Advisory Mental Health Council, National 
GROUPS Institute of Mental Health Board of Scientific Counselors, 
Community Services Committee, National Mental Health Man- 
power Studies Committee, eleven review committees. 



11-194 



National Institute of Mental Health — Statistical Summary 



DIRECTOR OF PROGRAM: Dr. R. H. Felix 
ORGANIZATION (June 30, 1964) 



Unit__ Employees 

Office of Director 49 

Basic Research 58 

Addiction Research Center 60 

Lab. of Neurobiology 11 

Lab. of Neurophysiology 20 

Lab. of Neuro chemistry 10 

Lab. of Cellular Pharmacology 23 

Lab. of Clinical Science 60 

Lab. of Psychology 77 
Lab. of Socio-Environmental 

Studies 26 

Office of Clinical Director 18 
Clinical Neuropharmacology 

Research Center 57 



Unit 

Adult Psychiatry Branch 
Child Research Branch 
Biometrics Branch 
Office of Program Planning 
Mental Health Study Center 
Off. of Dir. Extramural Programs 



Employees 

51 
25 
68 
13 
59 
25 



Research Grants & Fellowships Branch 79 
Training & Manpower Branch 96 

Community Research & Services Branch 91 



Community M.H. Facilities 
Field Operations 
Psychopharmacology Svc. Center 
Career Development Program 
Clearinghouse 



8 
97 
40 
72 
42 



1,235 



1/ 



PERSONNEL (as of June 30) 

Paid employment 
In D.C. area 
Outside D.C. area 



1960 

779 
659 
120 



1961 

893 
789 
104 



1962 

1,046 
924 
122 



1963 

1,164 
992 
172 



1964 

1,235 

1,025 

210 



FUNDS (fiscal year) 

Total Available 

Appropriations and 
other funds 
Funds Available for; 



1961 



1962 



1963 



1964 



(in thousands) 



1965 (Est.) 



$95,761 $108, 458^143, 280 3 -/ 174,398^ 188,0981/ 



Direct Operations 


13,166 


16,648 


18,985 


23,917 


24,395 


Grants 


82,595 


91,810 


124,295 


150,481 


163,703 


PROGRAM STATISTICS 


1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 (Est. 


(fiscal year) 










No. of research papers 












submitted for publication 


by 










NIMH staff 


327 


382 


400 


472 


526 


Inpatient admission 












(to Clinical Center) 


109 


161 


179 


252 


213 


Outpatient visits 


2,520 


3,388 


5,625 


9,275 


7,129 


No. of research grant 












applications z Reviewed^ 


1,810 


2,167 


2,678 


2,903 


2,900 


Approved 


1,161 


1,350 


1,745 


1,995 


2,000 


No. of training grant . 
applications : Reviewed— ' 












1,012 


1,530 


1,556 


1,780 


1,900 


Approved 


844 


1,349 


1,447 


1,665 


1,780 



1/ Excludes allocation to St 
2/ Includes $71,000 of other 
3/ Includes $98,000 of other 



. Elizabeths Hosp. 4/Includes $124,953 of other funds 

funds available available 

funds available 5/Includes $162,000 " " " available 

TT - 1 95 6/ Includes non-competing continuations 



national Institute &£ Neurological Diseases and Blindness 

PROGRAM To conduct, s<ispp®rt , and stinmslate research relating to the 
0BJECTI¥8S causes, preveatiam, diagnosis, sad treatment of neurological 
and sensory disorders; to promote the coordination of such 
research aad the application of results; and to assist in the 
training of specialists in neurological and related research. 

EXTENT Of An estimated 2Q million Americans are afflicted by neurological 
PROBLEM or sensory disorders. Most of the disorders are not presently 
curable, and relatively few are amenable to treatment. These 
disorders include cerebral palsy, mental retardation, epilepsy, 
multiple sclerosis, muscular dystrophy, cerebrovascular disorders, 
Parkinsonism, and diseases of the eye and ear. 

PRESENT The Institute conducts basic and clinical research in the neuro- 
PROGRAM logical and sensory disorders. It supports research and research 
SCOPE training in medical schools, hospitals, and other institutions, 
by research fellowships, grants to medical schools and other 
institutions, and stipends to individuals for special training 
at both the clinical and basic research level. It coordinates 
broad-scale collaborative investigations in such areas as cere- 
bral palsy and the cerebrovascular disorders. 



During the past fiscal year, the Inst 
tional multidisciplinary study center 
tion and cure of the major disorders 
organs. One center is for Parkinson 1 
orders. This center is an important 
it will not only conduct a comprehens 
but will also serve as a focal point 
nation of information on Parkinson's 
community. 



itute developed six addi- 
s for research in preven- 
of the brain and sensory 
s disease and allied dis- 
program development since 
ive program of research 
for the review and dissemi- 
disease to the medical 



New knowledge of prematurity, neonatal jaundice, and asphyxia 
is being derived from early analysis of data now available 
within the Institute's multi-institutional Collaborative Peri- 
natal Project. Related animal studies with some nine hundred 
monkeys at the Institute's Laboratory of Perinatal Physiology 
in Puerto Rico have supplied information on events and circum- 
stances that occur during the perinatal period affecting preg- 
nancy outcome. 

LEGAL PHS Act, as amended, particularly Sec. 301, 431(a), 432-433 
BASIS (42 USC 241, 289a-289c). 

SOURCE OF Neurology and Blindness Activities; General Research and Services, 
FUNDS NIH-PHS . 

ADVISORY National Advisory Neurological Diseases and Blindness Council, 
GROUPS Board of Scientific Counselors, Advisory Panel on Evaluation of 
Clinical Therapy, five review committees. 



11-196 



National Institute of Neurological Diseases & Blindness — Statistical Summary 
DIRECTOR OF PROGRAM: Dr. Richard Masland 



Unit 

Office of Director 

Extramural Programs 

Collaborative and Field Research 

Intramural Research 

Office of Associate Director 
Electroencephalography Branch 
Medical Neurology Branch 
Opt ha lmo logy Branch 
Surgical Neurology Branch 
Laboratory of Biophysics 
Laboratory of Molecular Biology 
Laboratory of Neuroanatomical Sciences 
Laboratory of Neurochemistry 
Laboratory of Neuropathology 
Laboratory of Neurophysiology 



Total 



Employees 
67 
72 
371 

19 
12 
28 
29 
56 
15 
14 
30 
19 
6 
11 

749 



PERSONNEL (as of June 30) 

Paid employment 
In D.C. area 
Outside D.C. area 



1960 

430 

397 

33 



1961 

516 

472 

44 



1962 

615 

552 

63 



1963 

698 

624 

74 



1964 

749 

672 

77 



FUNDS (fiscal year) 



Total available 

Appropriations and 
other funds 

Funds available for: 



1961 



1962 



1963 



1964 



(in thousands) 



1965 (Est.) 



$49,600 $63,772^ $77,672 $82, 935 s -/ $87,823^ 



Direct operations 


8,373 


11,126 


12,794 


14,489 


14,676 


Grants 


41,227 


52,646 


64,878 


68,446 


73,147 


PROGRAM STATISTICS 


1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 (Est.) 


(fiscal year) 












No. of research papers 












submitted for publication 












by NINDB Staff 


181 


194 


189 


278 


218 


Inpatient admissions 












(to Clinical Center) 


700 


721 


756 


735 


629 


Outpatient visits 


1,300 


1,532 


1,844 


2,434 


3,140 


No. of research grant . 
applications: Reviewed— 












1,455 


1,632 


1,869 


1,995 


2,000 


Approved 


1,187 


1,336 


1,563 


1,680 


1,700 


Training Grant 

applications: Reviewed^-' 












237 


241 


274 


253 


315 


Approved 


204 


208 


238 


235 


290 



1/ Includes $1,000 of other funds available. 

_2/ Includes non-competing continuations. 

J3/ Includes $1,054 of other funds available. 

4/ Includes $2,000 of other funds available. 



11-197 



Clinical Center 

PROGRAM To provide the specialized forms of hospital care necessary 
OBJECTIVES for the study of both normal and abnormal physical and emotional 
phenomena in patients, thereby furthering the quest for new know- 
ledge of the diseases of man. To encourage the continuous inter- 
change of information and ideas between the many specialized 
branches of medical and laboratory science and, concurrently, 
to maintain an environment wherein productive medical research 
can be expected to flourish, and in which promising young 
physician- investigators may have advanced training opportunities 
which will fit them for successful careers in medical research 
and teaching. 

EXTENT OF The complexities of modern medical and related sciences have 
PROBLEM created a multitude of narrowly limited specialties. The system 
of daily operation at the Clinical Center integrates the various 
problems of these specialties and, in so doing, hastens the 
acquisition and evaluation of knowledge. This gives material aid 
in checking the mounting problem of chronic diseases and those 
with the highest incidence of mortality. 

PRESENT Opened in 1953, the Clinical Center is now operating at its 
PROGRAM planned total capacity of 516 beds and 1,100 laboratory modules. 
SCOPE Patients are admitted from all parts of the United States, after 

referral by their own physicians, if their illness and current 

condition meet the specific needs of an active research program. 

The patient-care organization of the Clinical Center provides 

all necessary hospital services. 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



PHS Act, as amended, particularly Sec. 301 (42 USC 241). 



SOURCE OF 
FUNDS 



Appropriation - General Research and Services, NIH-PHS. 



ADVISORY An advisory Medical Board composed of principal clinicians 
GROUPS from the various Institutes and the heads of central service 

medical departments. Numerous panels of specialty consultants 

on individual medical problems of patients. 



II - 198 



Clinical Center — Statistical Summary 



DIRECTOR OF PROGRAM: Dr. Jack Masur 



ORGANIZATION (June 30, 1964) 



Unit 








Employees 






Office of Director 








42 






Administrative Branch 








359 






Clinical and Professional Educational 


Service 




7 






Employee Health Service Branch 






23 






Admissions and Followup Department 






9 






Dental Department 








25 






Nursing Department 








559 

268 u 






Nutrition Department 












Social Service Department 








42 






Diagnostic X-ray Department 








50 






Anesthesiology Department 








23 , 
2/ 






Pathological Anatomy Department 










Clinical Pathology Department 






123 






Rehabilitation Department 








26 






Pharmacy Department 








65 






Medical Record Department 








77 






Blood Bank 








20 »/ 






Radiation Safety 








17 1/ 
1,735 






PERSONNEL (as of June 30) V 


1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 




Paid employment 


1,632 


1,625 


1,659 


1,693 


1,735 




In D. C. area 


1,628 


1,623 


1,658 


1,692 


1,734 




Outside D.C. area 


4 


2 


1 


1 


1 




FUNDS (fiscal year) A/ 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 


1965 (Est 


• ) 








(in thousands) 






Allocations 


$10,269 


$11,247 


$12,722 


$13,622 


$13,845 




Obligations 


10,257 


11,247 


12,722 


13,622 


13,845 




PROGRAM STATISTICS 


1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 




(Total NIH fiscal year) 














Level of bed activation 














reached 


516 


516 


516 


516 


516 




Bed days available 


188,856 


188,340 


188,340 


188,340 


188,340 




Patient days 


139,045 


141,214 


142,739 


142,135 


136,270 




Inpatient admissions 


3,555 


3,758 


3,941 


4,060 


3,953 




Outpatient visits 


26,387 


27,416 


38,339 


42,751 


42,424 





1/ Includes Clinical Center cafeteria employees and funds 

2/ Staffed by the National Cancer Institute 

3/ Transferred from Office of Administrative Management February 1, 1963. 



11-199 



Division of Biologies Standards 

PROGRAM To establish and maintain standards for the safety, potency, 
OBJECTIVES and purity of commercial biological products applicable to 

the prevention and treatment of diseases of man, and to con- 
duct related research and control activities. 



EXTENT OF 
PROBLEM 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



Many biologies are derived from bacteria and viruses, and all, 
by their nature, are potentially- dangerous if improperly pre- 
pared and tested. Thus, close surveillance of production and 
constant improvement in quality are essential. Through biologi- 
cal research, smallpox, scarlet fever, typhoid fever, diptheria, 
yellow fever, rabies, tetanus, and poliomyelitis can now be pre- 
vented or treated, but many infectious diseases remain for which 
science is attempting to develop antigens. The Division's 
flexible research program makes it possible to keep pace with 
these new developments. 

The Division's primary responsibility is administration of 
those sections of the Public Health Service Act pertaining to 
the sale of biological products in interstate commerce, as well 
as export and import. Subject to regulation are the vaccines, 
serums, toxins, antitoxins, and analagous products, including 
human blood and its derivatives. Effective discharge of these 
responsibilities requires the design and development, within a 
research context, of adequate and practical standards for the 
production and testing of biologies, careful surveillance of 
production methods, and the continuous improvement of testing 
procedures. Over 7,000 control tests are performed annually 
on individual lots of biological products. Seventy-five official 
standard, reference and control preparations are currently main- 
tained, and each year approximately 6,000 vials of standard 
reference preparations are distributed to manufacturers and 
laboratories throughout the world engaged in biological stand- 
ardization. 



LEGAL 
BASIS 

SOURCE OF 
FUNDS 



PHS Act, as amended, particularly Sec. 301, 351, 352 (42 USC 
241, 262, 263) 

Biologies Standards; General Research and Services, NIH-PHS 



ADVISORY Board of Scientific Counselors, Ad Hoc Committee on Live 
GROUPS Poliovirus Vaccine, Technical Committee on Poliomyelitis 
Vaccine . 



II - 200 



Division of Biologies ttaadards — *t»tistic*l 



DIRECTOR Of PRO-AM ; 9r . Roderick Murray 
ORGANIZATION (Juae 39, 1%4) 



Unit 






Bap layers 






Office of Mrector 






€8 






Laboratory of Virology and Rickettsiology 




53 






Laboratory of Viral Immunology 






48 






Laboratory of Biophysics and Biochemistry 




10 






Laboratory of Blood and Blood Products 




42 






Laboratory of Bacterial Product 


s 




19 






Laboratory of Control Activitie 


:S 




27 










Total 


267 






PERSONNEL (as of June 30) 


1960 1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 




Paid employment 


198 226 


207 


231 


267 




In D. C. area 


197 225 


207 


231 


267 




Outside D. C. area 


1 1 













FUNDS (fiscal year) 


1961 1962 


1963 


1964 


1965 


(Est.) 






(in thousands) 






Total available 












Appropriations 


$2,970 $3,036 


$3,947 


$4,777 


$4,959 




Funds available for: 












Direct operations 


$2,926 $3,036 


$3,947 


$4,777 


$4,959 




PROGRAM STATISTICS 


1960 1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 


(Est . ) 


(fiscal year) 












No. of research papers submitted 










for publication by DBS Staff 


55 73 


45 


42 


41 




Total No. of establishments 












licensed 


186 190 


1% 


203 


207 




Total No. of product licenses 












in effect 


1,217 1,200 


1,230 


1,300 


1,327 




No. of licenses issued 












during fiscal year: 












Establishment 


19 19 


13 


24 


20 




Product 


63 32 


59 


102 


70 





II 



201 



Division of Research Grants 

PROGRAM To formulate, coordinate, and evaluate policies and procedures 
OBJECTIVES governing the administration of PHS extramural programs; to 
provide scientific and technical review of applications for 
research grants and fellowship awards through the mechanism 
of study sections, panels, and committees composed of scientists 
from universities and research institutions; to provide basic 
operating statistics and to conduct continuous statistical 
analysis of all extramural programs. 

EXTENT OF In recent years, national concern with the need to combat dis- 
PROBLEM ease in man has led to vastly increased federal expenditures 

for research into the causes, cure, and prevention of the chronic 
and infectious diseases to which man is prone. Generally, the 
funds available from non-government sources have been insuffi- 
cient to initiate or continue significant research or to guaran- 
tee a continuing supply of medical research manpower. 

PRESENT Presently, over 80 percent of the appropriations to the National 
PROGRAM Institutes of Health are used to support programs of research 
SCOPE and research training in the health and health-related sciences 
in research institutions and universities. The Division is re- 
sponsible for coordinating development of policies and procedures 
in grant administration for 23 PHS institutes and divisions. 
It is responsible for managing the DRG study sections, panels, 
and committees, and their preliminary review of research grant 
and fellowship applications, and, in addition, assigns all such 
grants and awards to the appropriate reviewing group and PHS 
institute or division; establishes policies and procedures for 
administering and managing grants for research, training and 
fellowship programs; provides statistical data and analysis 
for control of operations and guidance of program planning activi- 
ties, and disseminates information on the extramural program 
to the general and scientific public. The Division also admini- 
sters the patent policies and procedures governing PHS grantee 
inventions, and coordinates the Grants Associates Program of 
the National Institutes of Health. 

The Division has compiled, in coordination with the supporting 
PHS institutes and divisions, a Grants Manual, which was dis- 
tributed to grantee institutions to assist them in administer- 
ing PHS research grant funds. 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



PHS Act, as amended, particularly Sec. 301 (42 USC 241), 



SOURCE OF 
FUNDS 



ADVISORY 
GROUPS 



NIH Management Funds - transferred from appropriations to the 
PHS institutes and divisions which rely on administrative and 
technical services provided by the Division. 

Fifty- two review committees. 



II - 202 



Division of Research Grants -- Statistical Summary 
CHIEF OF PROGRAM: Dr. Eugene A. Confrey 
ORGANIZATION (June 30, 1964) 



Unit 

Office of the Chief 
Internal Operations Branch 
Career Development Review Branch 
Research Grants Review Branch 
Statistics and Analysis Branch 
Grants Management Branch 
Special Programs Review Branch 



Employees 

68 
36 
87 

154 

147 

56 

1 



Total 



549 



PERSONNEL (as of June 30) 

Paid employment 
In D.C. area 
Outside D. C. area 



1960 



380 

370 

10 



1961 



498 

498 





1962 



502 

502 





1963 

531 

531 





1964 



549 

549 





FUNDS (fiscal year) 

Allocations 
Obligations 



1961 

$4,124 
4,100 



1962 1963 1964 1965 (Est) 

$7,108 
4,570 5,878 6,679 7,108 



(in thousands) 
$4,570 $5,878 $6,679 



PROGRAM STATISTICS 



1960 



(total NIH fiscal year) 
Research grant 

applications: Reviewed —' 13,557 
Approved 11,010 



Research fellowship 



applications: Reviewed — 
Approved 



2/ 



4,367 
3,712 



1961 



16,513 
13,252 

5,479 
4,703 



1962 



19,757 
15,557 

6,311 
5,331 



1963 



21,203 
16,903 



6,619 
5,538 



1964 (Est) 



21,400 
17,300 



7,500 
6,400 



11 Includes non-competing continuations 

2/ Includes applications pending final action 



II - 203 



Division of Research Facilities and Resources 

PROGRAM To plan and administer grant programs providing resources and 
OBJECTIVES facilities for the total research programs of institutions 

conducting health-related research, including health research 
facilities construction, general clinical centers, general re- 
search support grants, primate and animal resources, special 
research resources, and biomedical information sciences. 

EXTENT OF In recent years, the kinds of research contemplated by individ- 
PROBLEM ual investigators have demanded increasingly sophisticated and 
expensive facilities. Generally, individual projects and in- 
vestigators have not been able to justify fully expenditures 
for such facilities; rather, it has been the institution con- 
ducting research that has sponsored and supported the construc- 
tion and development of multipurpose, multicategorical facili- 
ties and resources. 

PRESENT Many of these programs had been in operation for several years 
PROGRAM prior to their consolidation in the Division in 1962. More 
SCOPE than 1100 grants, totalling $280 million of 50/50 matching 

Federal funds have been awarded to more than 390 institutions 
to aid in construction of health research facilities. Seventy- 
eight general clinical research centers have been approved to 
permit institutions to conduct broad scale general clinical 
research. Awards have been made for 6 regional primate centers 
and one national conditioning center. The program is being ex- 
tended to provide for regional resources for development of 
other laboratory animal colonies for experimental purposes. 
Thirty-two computer centers and one biomedical engineering pro- 
gram have been established, and other specialized resources are 
being provided for institutions which include programs in the 
health information sciences and for establishing centers for 
special resources in comparative physiology, biochemistry, be- 
havioral sciences, and biomedical engineering. Approximately 
262 institutions are receiving general purpose research and re- 
search support grants for the development of broad research 
programs. 

PL 88-164, Mental Retardation Facilities and Community Mental 
Health Centers Construction Act of 1963, earmarked twenty-six 
million dollars, over a four-year period, for construction grants 
for centers for research on mental retardation and related 
aspects of human development. Establishment of the Scientific 
and Technical Information Resources Branch was approved. 



LEGAL 
BASIS 

SOURCE OF 
FUNDS 



PHS Act, as amended, particularly Section 301 and Titles IV and 
VII (42 USC 241, 281-289c, 292-292i) 

Annual Congressional Appropriation 



ADVISORY National Advisory Council on Health Research Facilities Construc- 
GROUPS tion, and National Advisory Research Resources Committee. Ad- 
visory Committee on Animal Resources; three review committees. 



II - 20U 



Division of Research Facilities and Resources — Statistical Summary 
CHIEF OF PROGRAM! Dr. Frederick L. Stone 



ORGANIZATION t (June 30, 1964) 
Unit 

Office of the Chief 

General Research Support Grants 

General Clinical Research Centers 

Special Research Resources Branch 

Animal Resources Branch 

Health Research Facilities Branch 

Office of Architecture and Engineering 



Employees 

41 
11 
16 

4 

8 
42 
13 



Total 



135 



PERSONNEL (as of June 30) 

Paid employment 
In D. C. area 
Outside D. C. area 



1963 



112 
95 
17 



1964 



135 

117 

18 



FUNDS (fiscal year) 1963 


1964 
(in thousands) 


1965 


(Est.) 


Total available 








Appropriations $95,299-^ 


$96,405^ 


$102,829 




Funds available for: 








Direct operations 3,362 


1,875 


1,945 




Grants 91,937 


94,530 


$100,884 




PROGRAM STATISTICS (fiscal year) 1963 


1964 






Special Program grant applications: .3/ 








Reviewed 92 


79 






Approved 55 


45 






Construction grant applications: 


111 A/ 






Reviewed 160 






Approved 131 


90 it/ 






General research support grant 








applications 








Reviewed 353 


304 






Approved 264 


262 







1/ Includes $50,000,000 for grants for construction of health research facilities 

and $312,000 of other funds available. 
2/ Includes $56,000,000 for grants for construction of health research facilities 

and $98,995 of other funds available. 
_3/ Includes grant applications for Special Research Resources, General Clinical 

Research Centers, Primate Centers and Animal Resources. 
4_/ Includes grants for construction of mental retardation facilities and community 

mental health centers. 



II -205 



PROGRAMS 
OF THE 
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE 

PART II 

Saint Elizabeths Hospital 
TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

Commissioner's Statement 11-209 

Saint Elizabeths Hospital 11-210 

Digest of Legislation 11-21 1 

Statistical Summary 11-213 



II - 207 



Saint Elizabeths Hospital - Dr. Dale C. Cameron, Superintendent 



Saint Elizabeths Hospital is the largest Federally-operated hospital 
for the mentally ill. The patient population is composed of District 
of Columbia residents, beneficiaries of the Veterans Administration, 
persons charged with or convicted of crimes in the United States courts 
including courts of the District of Columbia and a number of other 
categories. 

The Hospital conducts extensive research and training programs along 
with its primary objective of treating the mentally ill. The research 
programs provide insight to the causes, treatment and prevention of 
mental illness. The Hospital's training program provides an additional 
source of professional staff essential for the treatment program. 

Fiscal Year 1964 was the first year of operations under an indefinite 
appropriation. The Hospital received appropriated funds equal to the 
difference between the amount of patient care reimbursements actually 
received and the total program costs approved by the Congress. 

Another fiscal improvement during the year was the placement of charges 
for the care of District of Columbia patients on a basis comparable 
with mental hospital costs in the upper ten percent of the states. 
This change in rates placed Saint Elizabeths Hospital costs to the 
District of Columbia at a level which it could reasonably be expected 
to support. Also, it provides greater incentives for the out-place- 
ment in lower cost facilities of those D.C. patients who no longer 
require treatment in a mental hospital. 



II - 209 



Saint Elizabeths Hospital 



PROGRAM To furnish "the most humane care and enlightened curative 
OBJECTIVES treatment" for several classes of mentally ill persons, 
including residents of the District of Columbia, bene- 
ficiaries of the Veterans Administration, beneficiaries 
of the Public Health Service, mentally ill persons charged 
with or convicted of crimes in the United States courts, 
including the courts of the District of Columbia, certain 
American citizens and nationals found mentally ill in 
foreign countries, the Canal Zone and the Virgin Islands, 
and members of the military services admitted to the 
Hospital prior to July 16, 19^6. Admission requirements 
are covered by numerous statutes. Detailed information 
may be secured from the Hospital Registrar. 

EXTENT OF Certain categories of patients, notably Federal and District 
PROBLEM prisoners, impose unique demands on the Hospital and staff. 
The location of the Hospital in the National Capital brings 
to Saint Elizabeths a considerable number of non-residents 
and their admission and treatment add materially to the 
administrative, fiscal, and medical workload of the Hospital. 

PRESENT Present program operations are directed toward the accom- 
PROGRAM plishment of the primary function of the Hospital - the care 
SCOPE of the patient - and include (a) the most effective modern 

treatment methods attainable with present resources, (b) the 
instruction and training of Hospital physicians and members 
of related professions and services, and (c) carrying out 
research and cooperating with organizations or individuals 
engaged in scientific research into the nature, causes, pre- 
vention, and treatment of mental illness. In some instances, 
research is undertaken jointly with the National Institute of 
Mental Health. 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



Established by the Act of March 3, 1855, Rev. Stat. § ^838 
(1875), 2k U.S.C. 161. Designated as Saint Elizabeths Hos- 
pital by the Act of July 1, 1916, 39 Stat. 309, § 1. 



SOURCE 
OF FUNDS 



Salaries and Expenses - An annual Congressional appropriation 
for the operation and maintenance of the Hospital is supplemented 
by reimbursements from the District of Columbia and certain 
Federal agencies for patient care furnished their beneficiaries, 
and to a small extent by miscellaneous receipts. 



11-210 



Buildings and Facilities - Funds for miscellaneous im- 
provements of existing facilities and for new construction 
are obtained by a separate annual Federal appropriation. 
However, in accordance with the provisions of Public Law 
472, 83d Cong., 2d Sess. (July 2, 195*0, 68 Stat. 443, the 
District of Columbia is required to pay a proportionate 
share of the cost of major repairs and of new construction 
authorized at Saint Elizabeths Hospital. Such costs are 
included in the patient per diem rate calculated for the 
District of Columbia pursuant to Section 2 of the Act of 
August 4, 19V7, 61 Stat. 751, 24 U.S.C. l68a, and the 
amounts so collected are deposited in the Treasury to the 
credit of miscellaneous receipts. 



Digest of Legislation Governing Operations of 

SAINT ELIZABETHS HOSPITAL 



1855 Established as the Government Hospital for the Insane under Act 
of March 3, 1855, Rev. Stat. § 4838 (l8?5) , 24 U.S.C. l6l. 

1916 Designated as Saint Elizabeths Hospital by the Act of July 1, 
1916, § 1, 39 Stat. 309. 

1940 Functions of Saint Elizabeths Hospital transferred from the 
Department of Interior to the Federal Security Agency under 
Reorganization Plan No. IV of 1940, § 11 (a), 54 Stat. 1236. 

1946 Functions of the Hospital and the Superintendent thereof and of 

the Federal Security Agency and the Federal Security Administrator 
relating to the insane of the Army and Navy of the United States 
transferred to the Secretary of the Army and the Secretary of the 
Navy under Reorganization Plan No. Ill of 1946, § 201, 60 Stat. 
1098. 

1953 Functions of the Federal Security Administrator transferred to 

the Secretary of the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare 
under Reorganization Plan No. I of 1953 » § 5, 67 Stat. 631* 

Basic laws governing the admission of patients and specific hos- 
pital functions are contained in Chapter 4 of Title 24, United States 
Code; Chapter 9, of Title 24, United States Code; Chapter 4 of Title 
32, District of Columbia Code (1961) ; and Chapter 3 of Title 24, 
District of Columbia Code (1961). 



11-211 



Saint Elizabeths Hospital - Statistical Summary 
SUPERINTENDENT : Dale C. Cameron, M.D. 
ORGANIZATION (June 30, 1964) 



Unit 
Office of the Superintendent 
Division of Administration 
Division of Medical Services 



Total 



Employees 

57 

1126 

2784 

3967 



PERSONNEL (as of June 30) 1960"""~ 1961 1962 ' 1963 196T 



Paid Employment 
in D.C. area 



3,132 
3,132 



3,439 
37539 



3,720 
3,720 



4,011 
4,011 



3,967 
37967 



FUNDS (fiscal year) 
Total Available 



I960 "T96T 



1962 19*63" 

(in thousands) 



" 195 7 " HHTe'st) 



Salaries and Expenses: $18, 488 $20,857 $22,498 $25,956 $27,909 $28,330 



Appropriations 
Reimbursements 



3,805 4,572 5,105 6,332 7,896 8,248 
14,683 16,285 17,393 19,624 20,013 20,082 



Buildings and Facilities 330 


5,445i/ 


645§/ 


8,095 


627 


2,032 


Appropriations 


330 


5,445 


645 


8,095 


627 


2,032 


Transfer to SEH 


80 


120 


166 


149 


154 


327 


NIMH-SEH Research 
Grants 


80 

a* 


100 
20 


100 
66 


115 
34 


120 
34 


125 
202 


PROGRAM STATISTICS 
(fiscal year) 


I960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 




Admissions 
Discharges 
Deaths 


1,894 

1,101 

504 


1,981 

1,395 

440 


2,024 

1,648 

484 


1,930 

1,559 

513 


1,692 

1,469 

444 




Average daily patient load6,983 


6 t 976 


6,839 


6,668 


6 ? 4l2 




Federal beneficiaries 
District of Columbia 


1,915 
5,068 


1,996 
4,980 


1,976 
4,863 


1,925 
4,743 


1,187. . 
5,225V 




Per diem rate 
(patient care) : 3/ 


$7o21 


$8.18 


$8.88 


$10.30 


$11,441/ 





1/ Includes $106,000 reappropriated by the 1961 Appropriations Act. 

]§/ Includes $70,000 reappropriated by the 1962 Appropriations Act. 

3/ The per diem rates shown are averages for the year. 

4/ Includes 658 District of Columbia "prisoners". 

5/ Excludes District of Columbia whose patient rate was $9«49. 



II - 213 



PROGRAMS 

OF THE 

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE 

PART II 

Social Security Administration 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

Statement by the Commissioner 11-217 

Social Security Administration 11-21 8 

Digest of Legislation Governing Operations of the 

Social Security Administration 11-220 

Old-Age, Survivors, and Disability Insurance Program . H-221 

Federal Credit Unions Program 11-228 



11-215 



Social Security Administration - Robert M. Ball, Commissioner 

The idea of old-age, survivors, and disability insurance — or social 
security, as most people call it — is a simple one. During working 
years covered workers and their employers pay contributions that go • 
into the social security trust funds; when earnings have stopped 
"because of retirement in old age, death or total disability, benefit 
payments are made from these funds to replace part of the lost 
earnings . 

When the program began in 1937> it covered only workers in commerce 
and industry, and provided benefits only for retired aged workers. 
Since that time a series of far-reaching improvements in the program 
have been adopted. It now covers almost all who work for a living, 
including the self-employed. Payments go not only to retired people, 
but also to their families, to disabled workers and their families, and 
to families of workers who have died. The level of benefits has been 
increased from time to time to reflect changing prices and levels of 
living. With all the improvements, the program has been kept on an 
actuarially sound basis to match income and outgo for the present and 
the future. 

An Advisory Council on Social Security, with membership representing 
employers, employees, the self-employed, and the public was appointed 
in June of I963. The Council completed its study of all aspects of 
the social security program in December I96U and submitted its report 
of findings and recommendations. 

Social security is now paying about 1.3 billion dollars each month to 
20 million men, women, and children. About 91$ of the people now 

becoming 65 are eligible for benefits. At the beginning of 196^, 
about 92 million people were insured under the program, 57 million 
permanently insured (that is, they had worked long enough to qualify 
for retirement benefits even if they did no more work under the pro- 
gram) . More than half of the insured group had worked long enough 
and recently enough to satisfy the work requirements for disability 
insurance protection should they become disabled in I96U . Wine out of 
ten young children and their mothers are assured of payments should 
the breadwinner die. Along with these significant security values for 
almost all American families, social security has also become an im- 
portant stabilizing influence in the Nation's economy. 

The Social Security Administration, through its Bureau of Federal 
Credit Unions, also is concerned with the promotion of thrift by 
encouraging cooperative systematic saving and making short-term loans 
available to credit union members at reasonable rates of interest. 

At the beginning of 196^, there were 10,955 Federally chartered credit 
unions in operation with 7-5 million members. These credit unions had 
assets of $3»9 billion and loans outstanding amounting to $2.9 billion. 



II - 217 



SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION 



RESPOESI- The Social Security Administration administers the old-age, 
BIT.TTIES survivors, and disability insurance program, and the Federal 
credit union program. It is responsible for studying 
problems of poverty and insecurity, and the contributions 
that can he made to their solution hy social insurance and 
related programs, and for making recommendations for the 
most effective methods of improving social and economic 
security through social insurance. 

SCOPE OF The Social Security Administration is composed of the 
ACTIVITIES Commissioner's staff, four operating divisions, five staff 
divisions, two special staffs, the Bureau of Hearings and 
Appeals, and the Bureau of Federal Credit Unions. 

Administration of the old-age, survivors, and disability 
insurance program involves the establishment and maintenance 
of individual accounts of earnings for employees and self- 
employed persons covered hy the Social Security Act; the 
processing of claims for benefits filed by aged workers, 
their wives, husbands and children, disabled workers and their 
dependents, and the survivors of deceased workers; the 
certification of benefit payments for people on the 
benefit rolls; and the holding of hearings and rendering 
of administrative decisions through the Bureau of Hearings 
and Appeals on appealed claims or other issues. In 
addition to its regular administrative duties, the Social 
Security Administration is actively concerned with the 
extent of the protection afforded by all public and private 
insurance and benefit programs, and their relationship to 
the basic protections provided by the old-age, survivors 
and disability insurance program. The program is admin- 
istered by a staff of some ^k,600 employees, working in 
11 regional and 6l6 district offices, seven payment 
centers, and the central headquarters in Baltimore. 

The administration of the Federal credit union program 
involves the establishment of a national system of 
cooperative associations for pooling the savings of 
members and making short-term loans to them at a low 
rate of interest. The program is administered by the 
Bureau of Federal Credit Unions which has its headquarters 
in Washington. Most of the Bureau's **25 employees are 
engaged in field activities throughout the Nation. 



11-218 



Social Security Administration-Statistical Summary l/ 

Director of SSA Programs - Ro"bert M. Ball, Commissioner of Social Security 

Employees (June 30, 1964) 

Advances and 

Regular Reimbursements 

Office of the Commissioner 19 

Old- Age, Survivors, and Disability Insurance Program. 34,603 129 

Federal Credit Union Program 433 

International Social Security Association 1 

PERSONNEL (June 30) i960 196l I962 I963 1964 

Paid Employment 2$, 833 31,14-40 34, $01 34,796 35,056 

In D.C. Area (in-.... 

eludes Baltimore).. 8,185 9,513 10,230 10,401 10,453 

Outside D.C. Area 17,648 21,927 24,271 24,395 24,603 

FUNDS (fiscal year) i960 1961 I962 1963 1964 1965 

(In thousand's) 

Total available: 

Appropriations $191,876 $232,496 $271,892 $286,838 $317,992 $337,376 3/ 

Advances and reim- 
bursements 485 696 1,379 673 803 881 

Fees (ICO) 3,306 3,591 M33 Ml5 ^7 5,038 

Funds available for: 

Direct operations... 195,667 236,783 273,304 291,821 323,190 337,545 3/ 

Construction — 4,000 — — 5,750 

International Social 
Security Asso- 
ciation meeting. . . — - — — 5 92 — 

Cooperative Research 

and Demonstration 2/ 2/ 2/ 246,000 510,000 

Projects -*-- -*■ -^~ 



J7 Actual past data in number of employees and funds have been adjusted to reflect 
the organization structure of the Social Security Administration under the 
reorganization effective January 28, 1963. 

2/ Ro estimate was made of the division of funds for Cooperative Research 
and Demonstration Projects between the Social Security and Welfare 
Admini strations . 

3/ Includes $5,216,000 pay increase supplemental. 



11-219 



DIGEST OF LEGISLATION GOVERNING OPERATIONS OF 
THE SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION 



I. Office of the Commissioner 

Specific delegated and participating functions of the Commissioner, 
including the statutory powers of the Secretary delegated to the 
Commissioner fay the Department Organization Manual Chapter 8-000, 
are expressly or impliedly stated in the following. Social Security 
Act of 1935 (P.L. 271, 7*rth Congress), as amended: Sections 201, 
205, 206, 217, 218, 221, 702, 703, 70!+, U02, 1106, and 1110; Social 
Security Amendments of 195& (P.L. 880, Qk-th Congress), as amended: 
Section ll6; Servicemen's and Veterans* Survivor Benefits Act 
(P.L. 881, 84th Congress): Sections 202, U(A-, 405, and 601; Rail- 
road Retirement Act of 1937 (P.L. 162, 75th Congress), as amended: 
Sections h and 5> Reorganization Plan No. 1 of 1953: Section k. 

II. Old- Age, Survivors, and Disability Insurance Program 

Social Security Act (P.L. 271, 7^th Congress), August Ik, 1935, 
Titles II and XI, as amended; Servicemen's and Veterans' Survivor 
Benefits Act (P.L. 88l, 8*t-th Congress), Sections 202, kok, ^05, and 
601; Railroad Retirement Act of 1937 (P.L. l62, 75th Congress), 
Sections h and 5> as amended. 

III. Federal Credit Unions Program 

Federal Credit Union Act (P.L. U67, 73rd Congress), June 26, 193^, 
as amended. 



II - 220 



Old-Age, Survivors, and Disability Insurance Program 



PROGRAM The primary goal of the OASDI program is to provide 
OBJECTIVES continuing income for individuals and their families 
as partial replacement of earnings lost through old- 
age retirement, permanent and total disability, or 
death of the family earner, and to do this in a way 
which enhances the dignity of the individual and fosters 
self-reliance. The system is supported by the contri- 
butions of covered workers and their employers and 
covered self-employed persons; benefits are earned 
through work and related to past earnings. Payments 
under the program serve as a base to which the indi- 
vidual may add savings, private insurance income, and 
income from private pension plans and other sources. 

EXTENT OF All workers and their dependents are subject to the risk 
PROBLEM of loss of earned income arising out of retirement, death, 
or permanent and total disability. 

PRESENT Coverage — The OASDI system covers almost all employment, 
PROGRAM both civilian and military, in the United States and 
SCOPE generally employment performed outside the United States 
by an American citizen for an American employer. It also 
covers earnings derived by self-employed individuals, 
The principal excluded groups are self-employed doctors 
of medicine and employees of the Federal Government who 
are covered by retirement systems. Certain conditions are 
attached to coverage for individuals in other groups. For 
example, the coverage of agricultural employees is based 
upon wage or regularity of employment tests, the coverage 
of domestic employees is based upon a wage test, and the 
coverage of self-employed persons is contingent upon their 
having net earnings from a trade or business of at least 
$400 a year. Employees of State and local governments are 
covered on the basis of voluntary agreements between the 
States and the Federal Government; commissioned, licensed, 
and ordained ministers may elect coverage as self-employed 
persons; certain employees of foreign governments and 
international organizations are compulsorily covered as 
self-employed persons; and employees of nonprofit organ- 
izations are covered on the basis of voluntary waivers of 
tax exemption filed by employers. Earnings up to $l+,800 
per year are covered. Contributions on covered earnings 
are at rates scheduled in the law — the contribution rates 
in effect in 196^ were 3 5/8 percent each for employees and 
employers and $.k percent for self-employed persons. 
Contribution rates will increase in I966 and again in 1968, 
when workers and their employers will each be paying k 5/8 
percent, and self-employed persons will be contributing 
6.9 percent, of covered earnings. 



II - 221 



Benefits - -Monthly old-age insurance benefits are payable to a 
retired insured person at age 62. Dependents' benefits are 
payable to the wife of a retired insured worker at age 62, or 
at any age if she has in her care a child entitled to child's 
benefits based on the earnings of her retired insured husband; 
and also to the retired worker's unmarried child under age 18 
(and at age 18 or over if the child is unable to engage in 
substantial gainful work because of a continuous severe physical 
or mental impairment that existed before age id). Under certain 
circumstances, benefits are also payable to the dependent 
husband age 62 or over of a retired insured woman worker. 

Monthly survivor benefits are payable to a widow at age 62, and 
to a mother (including a former wife divorced under certain 
conditions) at any age having in her care a child of her 
deceased husband entitled to child's benefits; to unmarried 
children under age 18 of a deceased worker (and to children 
18 or over who are unable to engage in substantial gainful work 
because of a severe physical or mental impairment that existed 
continuously since before age 18); to a dependent parent at age 
62 and, under certain conditions, to a dependent widower aged 
62 or over of an insured working woman. 

Full monthly benefits are payable in the case of widows, 
widowers and dependent parents aged 62 or over, but benefits to 
retired workers and wives or dependent husbands who elect to 
receive such benefits after attaining age 62 and before attain- 
ing age 65 are in actuarially reduced amounts which will 
continue to be paid throughout the period of entitlement. 

Monthly disability insurance benefits are payable to a worker 
under age 65 who is insured for the purpose of these benefits, 
and who is (and for at least 6 months has been) unable to 
engage in any substantial gainful work because of a medically 
determinable physical or mental impairment that can be expected 
to continue for a long and indefinite period or to result in 
death. Benefits for the dependents of disabled workers are 
payable under the same conditions as for dependents of retired 
workers. Disability insurance benefits may be paid for as many 
as 12 months during which a beneficiary is testing his ability 
to work despite his impairment. In any case, benefits are 
continued through the second month following the month in which 
the disability ceases. A disability benefit is not paid for 
any month in which the disabled beneficiary refuses without 
good cause to accept certain available rehabilitation services. 
The "disability freeze" provision preserves the future benefit 
rights of disability beneficiaries and of certain other dis- 
abled workers. Under this provision, the period during which 
an insured worker is disabled does not count against him in 
determining eligibility for, and the amount of, OASDI benefits 
which may become payable based on his earnings record. 



II - 222 



A beneficiary (unless age 72 or over) will have "benefits 
withheld if his earnings (whether or not in covered 
employment or self- employment) are over $1,200 in a year, 
at the rate of $1 in benefits for each $2 of earnings 
between $1,200 and $1,700, and for each $1 of earnings 
above $1,700, except that he is not subject to a deduction 
for any month in which he neither rendered services for 
wages in excess of $100 nor rendered substantial services 
in self -employment . 

In addition to any monthly payments, upon the death of an 
insured person a lump sum is payable to the surviving widow 
or widower if she or he was living in the same household 
with the deceased worker at the time of death. If no such 
person exists, the lump sum is payable as reimbursement to 
the person or persons who paid the burial expenses or 
directly to the funeral director for unpaid funeral home 
expenses on application of the person who assumed respon- 
sibility for the expenses. If no person assumes respon- 
sibility for the burial expenses within 90 days of the 
worker's death, the payment may be made to the funeral 
home on its own application. 

An individual who has been denied benefit payments may 
appeal his case to the Bureau of Hearings and Appeals. 
The Bureau of Hearings and Appeals, which has no respon- 
sibility for previous actions on the claims, has the 
authority to hold hearings, to render decisions and to 
review such decisions in cases in which a claimant for 
benefits or other entitlement disagrees with the recon- 
sidered or revised determination. The hearings are conducted 
throughout the country by hearing examiners, who inquire 
into the issues, make findings and issue decisions thereon, 
and notify the claimants of the decisions. The action of 
the hearing examiner is reviewable by the Appeals Council. 
The decision of the Appeals Council or, if it denies a 
request for review, the decision of the hearing examiner, 
becomes the final decision of the Secretary of Health, 
Education, and Welfare. All such decisions are appealable 
to the Federal courts. 

LEGAL BASIS Social Security Act (P.L. 271, 7^th Congress), August ik, 
1935, Titles II and XI, as amended (U2 USC ^01 et seq. 
and 1301 et seq.). Administrative Procedure Act (P.L. ^0^, 
79th Congress) (5 USC 1001 et seq.). 



II - 223 



SOURCES OF Administrative expenses are met from the Federal Old- Age 
FUNDS and Survivors Insurance Trust Fund and the Federal 

Disability Insurance Trust Fund. Benefit payments are 
made directly from the trust funds in accordance with 
sections 201 (h) and 205 (i) of the Social Security Act, 
as amended. All of the funds not needed for current "benefit 
payments and administrative expenses are invested in 
obligations of the United States. Income of the trust 
funds consists of amounts equivalent to the contributions 
of employers, employees and the self-employed plus interest 
on investments of the funds. 



ADVISORY 
GROUPS 



RECENT 
CHANGES 



Advisory Council on Social Security Financing appointed in 
1963; it is the second in a series of councils provided for 
under the 1956 amendments. The law provides for naming 
subsequent councils in 1966 and every fifth year thereafter. 
All of these councils are required by law to study and 
report on the financing of the program. However, the 
I963 Advisory Council was, in addition, directed under 
the amendments of i960 to study all other aspects of the 
program. Medical Advisory Committee appointed in 1955 as 
a continuing body to counsel SSA on medical aspects of 
administering the disability provisions. Under Executive 
Order 11007, signed February 28, 1962, Medical Advisory 
Committees are appointed for 2-year terms. Various other 
ad hoc groups in the past. 

Public Laws 88-350, approved July 2, 1964 and 88-382, 
approved July 23, 1964, made minor changes in the coverage 
provisions for employees of State and local governments. 
Public Law 88-650, approved October 13, 1964, removed a 
restriction on the retroactivity of disability applications, 
provided a further opportunity (through April 15, 19^5) for 
election of social security coverage by those ministers who 
had not previously elected coverage, and made several other 
minor changes in the coverage provisions. 



II - 224 



Old-Age, Survivors, and Disability Insurance Program — l/ 
Statistical Summary 



ORGANIZATION: (June 30, l°6k) 



Unit Employees 

Accounting Operations 5,753 

Management 793 

Claims Control 8,898 

Claims Policy 178 
Program Evaluation 

and Planning llU 

Research and Statistics 279 



Unit 


Employees 


Actuary 


k 9 


Central Planning Staff 


32 


Disability Operations 


1,61+8 


Field Operations 


15,867 


Hearings and Appeals 


875 


Information 


117 



Total 



3^,603 



PERSONNEL (as of June 30) i960 

Paid Employment 25,kh6 

In D.C. Area (in- 
cludes Baltimore ) . . . . 8, 135 
Outside D.C. Area 17,311 



1961 
31,02^ 



9,1+61 
21,563 



1962 
3*+, 066 



10,172 
23,891+ 



1963 



10,335 
2l+,011 



I96I+ 
3^,603 



10,386 
2^,217 



FUNDS (fiscal year) 



i960 I96I 



1962 1963 1961+ 1965 

( In thousands; 



Appropriations (Total) $191.876 :s232.j+96 $271.892 $286.833 3317.900 $337,376 3/ 
Direct Operations 2/ 191, «7& 232>96 26rj f OgZ 256,533 317,900 331.626 3/ 
Construction — — l+,©00 — — 5,750 



Reimbursements 



U85 



696 



1,379 



673 



803 



881 



l/ All past data have been adjusted to reflect the organizational structure 
of the Social Security Administration under the reorganization effective 
January 28, 1963. 

2/ Includes funds necessary to finance the Office of the Commissioner proper. 
3/ Includes $5*216,000 pay increase supplemental 



II - 225 



Old-Age, Survivors, and Disability Insurance Program-- 
Statistical Summary 

PROGRAM STATISTICS i960 196l 1962 19§3 19§!i 

Covered workers (millions) in pd. 

employment, cal. yr. ave. a/ 59-1 59-5 60.8 6l-7 63-1 
As a * of paid employment *f 87.6 87.6 87-7 87-9 88.0 

Insured workers (millions), , 

beginning of calendar year b/ 79-7 85A 89.I 90-V 92.0 93-6 



Monthly benefits, current-payment 

status, end of fiscal year: . 

Number (millions) Total lfc.3 15-6 17-3 18-6 19-5 20-2 

V OASI 13-7 1^-7 16.1 17.2 18.0 18.6 

DI .52 -90 1.15 1-38 1.52 1.6 

Amount (millions) Total $88 9 -9 $992.0 $1,128.2 $1,226.3 $1,296.1 $1,360- 

v OASI 851.8 931.7 1,053-1 1,137a 1,198.6 1,255. 

DI 38.1 60.3 75-1 88.8 97-5 105. 
Ave. monthly benefits, current-payment 

SSSi 3£ ST """ * *» * T..M. * T..J. * 73.00 * 73.60 

R.tlred vorter „d .g»d If. 123,10 125.10 Jg.JO 1*8.80 130.10 



57!20 58.20 65-^0 66. Uo 67-fcO 

wldowed'mother- and 2 children 173-20 186.50 190-30 191-50 193-90 

Disabled worker only 87-90 87-90 87-80 88.30 88.90 

Disabled worker, young wife, , 

and 1 or more children 186.50 190.10 191-00 192.60 193-60 



Old-Age and Survivors Insurance 



^oLTMliiS lyear): *10A $11-8 $ 12.0* 13-8$ 16.0 $ tf. 

Benefit payments (billions) 10.3 11.2 12-7 13.8 lU.6 15- 

Administrative expenses (millions) 202 236 251 263 303 *» 

Transfers to Railroad Retirement ,„ 

Account (millions) 600 332 361 ^3 ^f 399 

Fund, end of fiscal yr. (billions) 20.8 20.9 19-6 18.9 19-7 19- 

Disability Insurance Trust Fund 

££\S5L.) ^Q3J #1.083 $1,089 $1,1^ *l.|g *^g 

Benefit parents (millions) 528 70k 1,011 1,171 1,251 L^ 

Administrative expenses (millions) 32 36 6lt- 67 «* (* 
Transfers to Railroad Retirement 

Account (millions) 

Fund, end of fiscal yr. (millions) 2,167 2,50^ 



Account (millions) -27 5 U 2 19 JO 

m a. end of fiscal yr. (millions) 2,167 2,50^ 2,507 2,39^ 2,26V 1,968 



a/ Coverage in effect, based on the current population survey of the Census Bureau and Bureau 
of Labor Statistics. Includes Armed Forces and joint Railroad Retirement-OASDI coverage 
and beginning i960, Alaska and Hawaii. 

b/ Includes insured workers no longer in paid employment on date specified. 



II - 226 



Federal Credit Unions Program 



PROGRAM 
OBJECTIVES 



EXTENT OF 
PROBLEM 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



LEGAL 
BASIS 

SOURCE OF 
FUNDS 



RECENT 
CHANGES 



To make credit for provident purposes available to people of 
small means through a national system of cooperative thrift 
and loan associations. To stimulate systematic savings to 
provide liquid cash reserves for Federal credit union members 
"by emphasizing self-discipline and wise management of 
resources. To promote sound credit and thrift practices among 
credit union members and thereby help raise the standard of 
living, strengthen family life, increase self-reliance, and 
stabilize the economy of the United States. To provide a 
further market for securities of the United States. 

Families need their own voluntary savings readily available to 
strengthen their basic economic and social security, hut a 
great many have no liquid savings. Although society has 
made progress in alleviating the evils of usury, millions of 
people either have no access to credit at reasonable rates or 
do not use those sources which are available. Usurious money 
lenders continue to take a heavy toll of the worker's income. 
As the economy generally expands so does the need of people 
for systematic thrift and credit at reasonable rates. With the 
continually mounting pressure on consumers to go into debt, the 
need for consumer education in the wise use of credit becomes 
increasingly more important. 

The Bureau of Federal Credit Unions issues charters to eligible 
groups of people with a common bond of occupation, association, 
or residence within a well-defined neighborhood, community or 
rural district. Approximately once a year, it examines each 
Federal credit union for financial soundness, compliance with 
law and extent of service to its members. This examination is 
the principal supervisory tool of the Bureau. The Bureau issues 
rules and regulations, manuals, an annual Report of Operations, 
and a quarterly Bulletin to all Federal credit unions to guide 
them in accounting, management, credit policies, internal con- 
trols, family financial counseling, and other operating problems. 
The Bureau Director suspends charters, places in involuntary 
liquidation, or orders special reserves when violations or 
financial conditions threaten members' interests. In cooperation 
with other governmental and voluntary groups assists in 
research and development programs for extending thrift and 
credit service to people of low income. Provides information, 
consultation, and training in supervision and examination 
of credit unions for cooperative leaders from other countries. 

Federal Credit Union Act of June 26, V&h, as amended 
September 22, 1959, 73 Stat. 628, et. seq., 12 U.S.C. 1751-1772. 

Fees paid by Federal credit unions for chartering, supervision, 
and examination by the Bureau. Congress has appropriated no 
funds since 1953 • 

Public Law 88-353, approved Jul^r 2, l&k, amended the Federal 
Credit Union Act to allow Federal credit unions greater 
flexibility in their organization and operations. 

II - 228 



Federal Credit Unions Program — 
Statistical Summary 



ORGANIZATION; (June 30, 1964) 



Unit 


Employees 


Unit 




Employees 


Office of Director, BFCU 




8 


Research 


and Analysis 


6 




Regional and Field 


39! 


Program Services 




6 




Admini stration 




11 


Examination 




7 










Total 


433 




PERSONNEL (June 30) 


i960 


1961 


1962 1963 


1961+ 








Paid Employment 


374 


1+03 


1+18 1+23 


433 








In D.C. area 


37 


39 


i+l 39 


"47 








Outside D.C. 


337 


364 


377 381+ 


386 








FUNDS: (fiscal year) 


i960 


1961 


1962 1963 


1964 


1965 (' 


5S1 


>•) 








(in thousands) 








Appropriations 


$0 


$0 


$0 $0 


$0 


$0 






Fees 


3,306 


3,591 4 


,033 4,315 


4,487 


5,065 






PROGRAM STATISTICS (Calendar Year) 














1959 


i960 


1961 


1962 


1963 




1964 


BFCU Operations 
















FCU's chartered 


700 


685 


671 


601 


622 




600 


FCU's operating 


9,1*7 


9,905 


10,271 


10,632 


10,955 




11,275 


FCU's examined 


9,325 


8,898 


9,561 


10,140 


10,567 




10,463 


Percentage examined 


98 


90 


93 


95 


96 




93 


Federal Credit Unions (i 


n millions) 














1959 


i960 


1961 


1962 


1963 




1964 


Number of members 


5.6 


6.0 


6.5 


7.0 


7.5 




8.1 


Number of loans made 
















to members 


4.2 


4.6 


4.7 


5.0 


5.3 




5.6 


Amount of loans made 


$2,1+97 


$2,975 


$3,134 


$3,572 


$4,017 




$4,523 


Loans outstanding 


1,666 


2,021 


2,21+5 


2,561 


2,911 




3,349 


Shares 


2,075 


2,344 


2,673 


3,020 


3,453 




4,017 


Assets 


2,352 


2,669 


3,028 


3,430 


3,917 




4,445 



II - 229 



PROGRAMS 
OF THE 

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. EDUCATION, AMD WELFARE 

PART II 
Vocational Rehabilitation Administration 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 
Statement by the Commissioner 11-233 

Vocational Rehabilitation Administration II-23U 

Support Grants and Extension and Improvement Grants 11-23'; 

Research and Demonstration Grants 11-236 

Training Grants II-236 

Randolph-Sheppard Vending Stand Program for the Blind II-237 

Rehabilitation Facilities II-237 

Civil Defense Emergency Plans II-237 

Advisory Groups II-237 

Digest of Legislation II-238 

Statistical Summary (Personnel, Funds and Program Statistics) II-2U1 



II - 231 



Vocational Rehabilitation Administration - Mary E. Switzer, Commissioner 

In 1964, a total of 119,700 disabled men and women were rehabilitated 
by the federal-state program of vocational rehabilitation. About 75 
percent of them had been unemployed when they were accepted for service 
by the state vocational rehabilitation agencies; approximately 19 percent 
were being maintained at public expense in institutions or on public 
assistance; nearly a fifth were physically or mentally handicapped young 
people under age 21; and more than a third represented the other end of 
the age spectrum — those who were age 45 or over. 

Through the rehabilitation program, these people received services 
enabling them to regain function and perform useful work — services 
including special counseling and evaluation, medical and surgical 
service, prosthetic limbs and other appliances, job training and 
placement and a variety of other services according to individual 
needs. 

To help insure more and better services in the future, the VRA 
conducts a program of research and demonstration grants, a training 
program to produce more skilled workers to serve the disabled, and 
an international rehabilitation research program to secure the benefits 
of the research talents of other countries and to aid in development 
of their rehabilitation programs. 



II - 233 



VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION ADMINISTRATION 

PROGRAM (I) To assist the States in rehabilitating physically and 
OBJECTIVES mentally handicapped individuals so that they nay prepare 
for and engage in remunerative employment to the extent of 
their capabilities, thereby increasing not only their social 
and economic well-being but also the productive capacity of 
the nation; (2) to encourage and support research (both 
national and international) and demonstrations by State, 
public and other nonprofit agencies in methods and tech- 
niques for improving and expanding vocational rehabilitation 
services to disabled persons; (3) to provide professional 
training and instruction in technical matters relating to 
vocational rehabilitation; (4) to prepare national emer- 
gency plans and develop preparedness programs covering 
rehabilitation of disabled survivors. 

EXTENT OF There are an estimated 2.5 million handicapped people in 
PROBLEM the nation who need vocational rehabilitation services in 
order to work. Each year an estimated 290,000 disabled 
people came to need rehabilitation services in order to 
begin work or to return to work. During fiscal year 1963, 
110,136 disabled persons were rehabilitated, and in 1964, 
119,708. 

The immediate objective of the State-Federal vocational 
rehabilitation problem is the vocational rehabilitation of 
200,000 disabled persons annually. Many obstacles which 
prevent the achievement of this goal must be overcome. 
Trained personnel and adequate facilities are in very short 
supply. Specialized rehabilitation facilities needed for 
the severely disabled are thinly spread and have limited 
capacity. New rehabilitation methods and techniques need 
to be developed through research activities; and the new 
knowledge and methods secured through these research 
projects need to be given widespread application. Personnel 
in the many varied professional and admimistrative compe- 
tencies must be obtained for staffing the expanded State 
programs and new facilities. 



PRESENT 

PROGRAM 

SCOPE: 

STATE-FEDERAL 

REHABILITATION 

PROGRAM 



The vocational rehabilitation program in a State is admin- 
istered under a State plan which must be in effect in all 
political subdivisions of the State. The State program may 
be administered by the State agency responsible for voca- 
tional education in the State or a State agency primarily 
concerned with vocational rehabilitation. This is the 
sole State agency, except that there may be a separate 
State agency authorized to provide rehabilitation services 
to the blind. The State agency may directly administer 
the plan throughout the State or may supervise its 
administration in a political subdivision by a sole 
local agency of the political subdivision. Under agree- 



II - 23k 



VOCATIONAL 

REHABILITATION 

SERVICES 



GRANTS 



Vocational Rehabilitation Administration (continued) 

ments with the Social Security Administration, the State 
vocational rehabilitation agencies in all but five States 
make determinations of disability of individuals applying 
for disability freeze and disability benefit payments. 

A rehabilitation program exists in all 50 States and in 
the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, 
and Guam. In 36 jurisdictions there are now separate 
agencies engaged in the rehabilitation of the blind. 

State agencies can provide vocational rehabilitation services 
including: medical diagnostic and other services to assess 
the degree of disability and the individual's work capacities; 
individualized guidance and counseling; physical restoration 
and medical treatment; artificial appliances; occupational 
training and adjustment; occupational tools and licenses; 
job placement in competitive, sheltered, or self employment; 
and follow-up to see that the placement is satisfactory to 
the individual and to the employer. Services other than 
guidance, counseling, placement, and generally training, are 
paid for by public funds to the extent the individual cannot 
pay for them. Vocational rehabilitation services also 
include the acquisition of vending stands or other equipment 
and initial stocks and supplies for use by severely handi- 
capped individuals in small businesses managed and supervised 
by the State agency, and the establishment of public and 
private nonprofit rehabilitation facilities and workshops. 

Grants are made for (1) basic support of vocational rehab- 
ilitation services and extension and improvement of these 
services, (2) research and demonstration projects, 
(3) training and trainee ships, (4) research and training 
centers, and (5) international research and demonstration 
projects. 

Support Grants and Extension and Improvement Grants . 
Support grant funds are allotted to the State on the basis 
of population weighted by per capita income with provision 
for a floor. The amount of funds to be allotted, known as 
the allotment base, is specified in the Appropriation Act. 
Hatching rates are related to the fiscal capacity of a State 
as reflected by per capita income. Matching rates range 
from a minimum Federal share of 50% to a maximum Federal 
share of 70%. Additional allotments for grants may be made 
in fiscal year 1965 to States in which the Federal share of 
the costs of rehabilitation services under the support pro- 
gram exceeds their respective allotments computed on the 
specified allotment base. 

Extension and improvement grant funds are allotted to States 
on the basis of population with a $15,000 minimum. The 



II - 235 



Vocational Rehabilitation Administration (continued) 

project for which the grant is to be made must be for an 
activity included in the State plan and must constitute an 
extension or improvement of vocational rehabilitation 
services under the State plan or contribute materially 
to such an extension or improvement. 

Research and Demonstration Grants . These include grants 
to States and other public and nonprofit organizations and 
agencies for paying part (Federal percentage not fixed by 
the Act) of the cost of projects for research and demonstra- 
tions, and projects for the establishment of special 
facilities and services which hold promise of making a sub- 
stantial contribution to the solution of vocational rehabili- 
tation problems common to all or several States. Demonstra- 
tions include selected demonstrations based on a successful 
demonstration as prototype and instituting a new type of 
service to be taken over later by the community. 

A program of research is carried out directly by VRA staff, 
particularly in the psycho- social and medical sciences 
which contribute to improved rehabilitation services. 

Training Grants . Grants are made to schools, universities 
and other agencies to pay part of the cost of professional 
education of personnel in all fields which contribute to 
vocational rehabilitation and for traineeships. Grants are 
also made for short-term intensive training and instruction 
in technical matters relating to vocational rehabilitation, 
and for research fellowships. 

Research and Training Center Grants . Program- type grants 
are made to carefully selected universities and their 
medical schools with well -organized programs of physical 
medicine and rehabilitation placing primary emphasis on 
a sound program of research, training and comprehensive 
patient care of the chronically disabled and severely 
handicapped. In some circumstances grants may be made 
to institutions in the process of early development of 
their programs. 

International Research . Grants of foreign currencies are 
made to public and other nonprofit organizations in certain 
foreign countries for the support of rehabilitation research 
and demonstration programs designed to improve rehabili- 
tation techniques in the United States and in the cooperat- 
ing countries. Rehabilitation experts assigned to these 
projects and to similar research in the United States are 
interchanged to enhance the value of the research being 
conducted abroad and in the United States. 



II - 236 



Vocational Rehabilitation Administration (continued) 



RANDOLPH- 
SHEPPARD 
VENDING 
STAND 
PROGRAM 
FOR THE 
BLIND 



The purpose of the Randolph-Sheppard Act is to provide a 
preference to qualified blind persons, licensed by the State 
agency which administers vocational rehabilitation of the 
blind, to operate vending stands on Federal property. Heads 
of Federal departments and agencies in control of Federal 
property are required to prescribe regulations to assure 
such preference. These regulations are issued after con- 
sultation with the Secretary of Health, Education, and 
Welfare, and with the approval of the President. The 
authority of the Secretary has been delegated to the 
Commissioner of Vocational Rehabilitation; that of the 
President to the Director, Bureau of the Budget. 



REHABILI- 
TATION 
FACILITIES 



CIVIL 
DEFENSE 
EMERGENCY 
PLANS 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



SOURCE OF 
FUNDS 



ADVISORY 
GROUPS 



In addition to the authority in connection with the provisions 
of the Vocational Rehabilitation Act for grants for establish- 
ment of public and private nonprofit rehabilitation facilities 
and workshops, the authority of the Secretary of Health, 
Education, and Welfare to approve (together with the Surgeon 
General) applications for grants for the construction of 
public or other nonprofit rehabilitation facilities under 
the Medical Facilities Survey and Construction Act has been 
delegated to the Commissioner of Vocational Rehabilitation. 

National emergency plans and preparedness programs covering 
rehabilitation of disabled survivors are developed. The 
Commissioner of Vocational Rehabilitation coordinates 
activities with the Surgeon General, Public Health Service, 
in order that pre-emergency plans may be developed in 
agreement with post-attack organizational plans and structure 
of the Department for the Emergency Health Service. 

The Vocational Rehabilitation Act, as amended (29 U.S.C. Ch. 4); 
the Hawaii Omnibus Act, Section 47(g) (74 Stat. 423); the 
Randolph-Sheppard Act, as amended (20 U.S.C. Ch. 6A) ; the 
Medical Facilities Survey and Construction Act, as amended 
(42 U.S.C. 291v); the International Health Research Act of 
1960 (74 Stat. 364); Agricultural Trade Development and 
Assistance Act of 1954, Section 104(k), as amended 
(7 U.S.C. 1704(k)); and Executive Order 11001. 

Annual Congressional appropriations: Grants to States; 
Research and Training; Research and Training (Special 
Foreign Currency Program); and Salaries and Expenses. 

The National Advisory Council on Vocational Rehabilitation; 
three study sections in psycho- social, medical and sensory 
disabilities; the Medical Advisory Committee; the Council 
of State Directors of Vocational Rehabilitation; eight 
training and advisory panels in the following areas: 
medicine, nursing, occupational therapy, physical therapy, 
psychology, rehabilitation counseling, social work, speech 
pathology and audiology. 



II - 237 



Digest of Legislation Governing Operations 
of the Vocational Rehabilitation Administration 

The Vocational Rehabilitation Administration has responsibility for adminis- 
tering the following major pieces of legislation relating to the disabled: 

1. Vocational Rehabilitation Act, as amended (29 U.S.C. Ch. 4); 

Section 2 of Public Law 565, 83rd Congress, 68 Stat. 652 

Section 2 - grants to States for the basic support of vocational 
rehabilitation services 

Section 3 - grants to States for the extension and improvement of 
vocational rehabilitation services 

Section 4 - grants for research and demonstrations, and training 

Amendments to the Vocational Rehabilitation Act. 

- Act of August 1, 1956, Sec. 16 Public Law 896, 84th Congress, 
70 Stat. 910 - extension of provisions of Vocational 
Rehabilitation Act to Guam. 

- Public Law 937, 84th Congress, 70 Stat. 956 (now expired). 

- Public Law 85-198, 71 Stat. 473 - amendments to exempt physicians 
enrolled in residency training program in physical medicine and 
rehabilitation from the two-year limitation on receipt of a 
Vocational Rehabilitation Administration traineeship and permit 
them to receive a traineeship for as long as three years. 

- Public Law 85-213, 71 Stat. 488 (now expired). 

- Public Law 86-70, 73 Stat. 141 - amendments in connection with 
Alaska's statehood of financing provisions for Alaska's basic 
support program. 

- Public Law 86-624, 74 Stat. 411 - amendments in connection with 
Hawaii's statehood financing provisions for Hawaii's basic 
support program. Section 47(g) of this law (74 Stat. 423) 
affects Alaska's basic support program during the fiscal years 
1962 through 1965. 

2. International Health Research Act of 1960, Public Law 86-610, 74 Stat. 
364; and Section 104(k), Agricultural Trade Development and Assist- 
ance Act of 1954 as amended (7 U.S.C. 1704(k)) Foreign Currency 
Program - legislation in connection with administration of an inter- 
national research program with the purpose of enhancing rehabilitation 
research within the United States and over the world. 



II - 238 



Vocational Rehabilitation Administration (continued) 

3. Randolph- Sheppard Vending Stand Act, as amended (20 U. S.C. Ch. 6A) 

This Administration also has responsibilities In connection with the opera- 
tion of the following laws: 

1. Rehabilitation facilities provision of Title VI of the Hill-Burton 
Medical Facilities Survey and Construction Act, as amended 

(42 U.S.C. 29 Iv). 

2. Disability "freeze" and disability benefits provisions of the 
Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 421, 422). 

3. Public Welfare Amendments of 1962 (42 U.S.C. 303, 603, 1203, 
1353, 1383). 

This Administration also has been delegated the Secretary's functions under 
Section 9 of the Federal Employees' Compensation Act, as amended 
( 5 U.S.C. 759). 



II - 239 



Vocational Rehabilitation Administration — Statistical Summary 
COMMISSIONER : Mary E. Switzer 
ORGANIZATION : (June 30, 1964) 



Unit 

State Program Operations 

Research and Training 

Executive Direction and Program Coordination 

Management Services 

Regional Activities 

Aid for International Development 



Employees 

70 
51 
30 
42 
56 

4 

253 



PERSONNEL (as of June 30) 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 

Paid Employment 1/ 168 200 213 220 230 253 

In D.C. area 123 146 160 166 176 197 

Outside D.C. area 45 54 53 54 54 56 



1/ Excludes consultants hired on a W.A.E. basis 



FUNDS (fiscal year) 

Total available 
Appropriations 
Funds available for: 



1959 1960 1961 1962 
(in thousands! 



1963 



1964 



2/ Appropriation remains available until expended; amounts shown include 

unobligated funds from previous years. 
3/ Includes funds advanced from other agencies. 



1965 



$57,944 $66,393 $74,586 $88,972 $104,184 $130,884 $148,012 
57,915 66,338 74,519 88,397 102,926 128,415 146,305 



Grants to States 


47,000 


51,900 


56,200 


64,450 


72,940 


88,700 


100,100 


Research and Training 


9,400 


12,700 


15,355 


20,250 


25,500 


34,810 


41,065 


International Research 
















and Training 2/ 


— 





930 


1,902 


3,225 


4,426 


3,662 


Salaries and Expenses 3/ 


1,544 


1,793 


2,101 


2,370 


2,519 


2,948 


3,185 



II - 241 



Vocational Rehabilitation Administration -- Statistical Summary 

pMCRAM STATISTICS ... — 

Roforral* Fiscal Tear 

SS« "« 1959 ■»* 1261 i2« 196J U* 

Referral 

a. h.nd Jul, 1 ...114,241 120,750 122,835 122,172 133,016 139,735 147,402 

££Z2£L *«!;;• ;;«: : »k™ »*■«* ™.«» »m» 306,^5 326,917 36 5 ,?69 

Total referrals 369,873 373,002 379,648 409,295 439,401 466,652 573,371 



during" Jeer!?™!??! 113,855 121,559 126,839 140,476 148.763 160,611 179,132 

C1 .:«lc«).???? P !?f.f?!.... 135,268 128,608 130,637 135,803 150,903 158,900 171,735 
On hand June 30 1M.7S0 122.835 122-172 133.016 139.735 147,141 , ™-M 



Cases 

AC Sly I?!!!.?!. ^ 144,589 158,825 171,111 180,487 196,872 208,085 220,720 

AC d«5nJ year'?™'?!! 11VI.SS 12L559 126.839 140.476 148.76? 160,611 179,132 

^aurlnHelr? 8 . :?!!'!?!.... 258.444 280.384 297,950 320,963 345,635 368,696 399,852 

Nu-ber of rehabilltants 74,317 80.739 88.275 92,501 102,377 110.136 119,708 

Number of cases closed 
other than rehabill- 
tants: 

^t.rt.?"!""!?? 8,627 9,494 10,396 12,029 14,524 16,090 15,131 

B 1t. re rted^!!'^??.... 16.675 19.040 18.792 19.561 20.649 21.854 20.062 

Active cases on hand 

jZl X),. 1S8.825 171.111 180.487 196-872 208.085 220.616 244.951 



II - 2^2 



PROGRAMS 

OF THE 

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE 

PART II 

Welfare Administration 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

Statement "by the Commissioner „ . . 11-245 

Welfare Administration 11-246 

Digest of Legislation Governing Operations of the 

Welfare Administration II-251 

Office of Aging II-252 

Children 1 s Bureau 11-254 

Research H-258 

Maternal and Child Health and Crippled Children II-260 

Child Welfare II-263 

Juvenile Delinquency 11-266 

Bureau of Family Services 11-268 

Old-Age Assistance II-273 

Medical Assistance for the Aged 11-274 

Aid to the Blind 11-275 

Aid and Services to Needy Families with Children II-276 

Aid to the Permanently and Totally Disabled II-278 

Assistance for Repatriated United States Nationals II-279 

Civil Defense Emergency Welfare Services 11-282 

Office of Juvenile Delinquency and Youth Development 11-284 

Cuban Refugee Program 11-286 



II - 21+3 



Welfare Administration - Ellen Winston. Commissioner 

The opportunity and the challenge in public welfare have grown 
tremendously in the past two years: the opportunity for States and 
communities to move forward to take advantage of new Federally-aided 
programs; the challenge to them to utilize Federal aids to the 
greatest extent possible in helping individuals and families. 

The passage of the 1962 public welfare amendments to the Social 
Security Act, the establishment of the Welfare Administration in 1963, 
and the enactment of the Economic Opportunity Act in 1964 have pro- 
vided a strengthened legislative and administrative basis for welfare 
agencies to play a central role in the war against poverty. 

The old concept of welfare as a program limited primarily to cash 
assistance and a few child welfare services should now be assigned to 
the social historian. 

The new programs which provide for greater Federal contributions, 
including those which permit up to total Federal financing, make it 
possible for even the States and communities which have the severest 
problems of poverty, and the fewest financial resources, to draw on 
the resources of the Nation as a whole, while the development and ad- 
ministration of programs is left in the hands of those who know the 
problem ~est--the States and communities themselves. The Welfare 
Administration stands ready to assist in the development of new pro- 
grams and to provide the best technical help at its disposal. Our 
only limiting concerns are that the programs fulfill the requirements 
and intent of the law and that the taxpayer's dollar be well spent. 

The Welfare Administration is dedicated to the goals of preventive and 
rehabilitative services. Its concern embraces all who need help in 
order to be able to help themselves— children, the disabled, the ill, 
the unemployed, the aged. Its emphasis is on developing and pre- 
serving family life. Its goals are that no American suffer the hard- 
ships of dire poverty and that every American, to the full extent of 
his capabilities, may become a self-supporting and contributing member 
of our society. 



II - 245 



WELFARE ADMINISTRATION 

RESPONSI- The Welfare Administration is the operating agency of 
BILITIES the Department responsible for the administration of 
Federal welfare programs. These include programs to 
meet economic need, to provide a broad range of social 
welfare services, to support health services for mothers 
and children, to undertake studies and demonstrations in 
areas of social concern such as juvenile delinquency, 
and to mobilize planning to meet the needs of the aging. 

SCOPE OF As the focal point for policies related to the welfare 
ACTIVITIES needs of the American people, the Commissioner, to 

whom the Secretary has delegated authority to direct and 
supervise the Welfare Administration, is directly con- 
cerned with the adequacy and effectiveness of the services 
and financial assistance provided, and with the relation- 
ship between the welfare programs and other income- 
maintenance and service programs. Because the welfare 
programs are in large measure Federal-State programs, 
utilizing Federal grants-in-aid and consultation, the 
Administration is actively concerned with the develop- 
ment of programs in the States and maintains close 
relationships with State agencies. Similarly, relation- 
ships with related public programs, such as health, 
education, vocational rehabilitation and social security, 
and with private welfare programs are important. 

Providing services and technical assistance to trainees 
from other countries, and consultation to other nations 
through the Department of State and international 
organizations, also is a responsibility of this office. 

In 1961, a Federal program was established to deal with 
the needs of refugees from Cuba. Responsibility for the 
administration of the program rests with the Welfare 
Administration. In addition to its own resources, the 
Administration makes full use of the facilities of the 
Office of Education, the Public Health Service, the 
Bureau of Employment Security of the Labor Department 
and several state, local and private agencies. 

The Public Welfare Amendments of 1962 directed that an 
Advisory Council on Public Welfare be established in 1964 
for the purpose of reviewing the administration of the 
public assistance and child welfare services programs. 
This Council has been appointed by the Welfare Administra- 
tion and held its first meeting in July 1964. 



II - 2k6 



AGENCY The programs of the Welfare Administration are: 

PROGRAMS 

Federal public assistance grants for: old age assistance, 
medical assistance for the aged, aid and services to 
needy families with children, aid to the blind, aid to 
the permanently and totally disabled, and the combined 
program of aid to the aged, blind or disabled and medical 
assistance for the aged. These programs include emphasis 
on preventive and rehabilitative services and encompass 
not only persons currently receiving aid but also former 
and potential recipients . 

Investigating and reporting on all matters pertaining tc 
the welfare of children and child life; Federal grant 
programs for maternal and child health, crippled 
children, and child welfare services; including research, 
demonstration or training projects in child welfare and 
research projects relating to maternal and child health 
and crippled children's services; providing leadership 
in developing new and expanded services for mentally 
retarded children. 

Providing Federal grants for projects undertaken and techni- 
cal assistance under the Juvenile Delinquency and Youth 
Offenses Control Act of 1961 which was extended on 
July 9, 1964. 

Administration and study of programs and efforts to improve 
the situation of older persons. 

The administration of Federal funds for paying part or all 
the cost of research or demonstration projects relating 
to such matters as prevention or reduction of dependency 
or coordination of planning between private and public 
welfare agencies. 

Development and administration of emergency welfare plans 
for assistance to the civilian population in the event 
of an attack on the United States . 

Assistance to U. S. citizens, including the mentally ill, 
who are returned from other countries. 

Research and training in foreign countries where there are 
currencies excess to the normal requirements of the 
United States. The program is designed to give valuable 
data about the experience of other countries in the areas 
of maternal and child health, and welfare in general. 

Assistance for Cuban refugees to meet basic maintenance, 

health and educational needs, and finance costs of resettle- 
ment outside the Miami area. 



II - 2^7 



Welfare Administration — Statistical Summary 



Commissioner: Ellen Winston 
Organization: * 



Regular 

Office of the Commissioner 77 

Office of Aging 48 

Children's Bureau 297 

Bureau of Family Services 449 

Office of Juvenile Delinquency 

and Youth Development 32 

Cuban Refugee Program 101 

1004 



Allocation and 
Reimbursement Accounts 



7 
14 



25 



PERSONNEL (As of June 30) 

1963 1/ 1964 

Pfl-r . d Rf u plovment 856 1004 

In D. C. Area 567 691 

Outside D. C. Area 289 313 

FUNDS (fiscal year) (in thousands) 

1963 y 1964 1965 U 

Total available : 

Appropriations $2,900,518 $3,057,017 $2,975,090 (Est.) 

Funds available for : 

Salaries and , 

Expenses 8,001 10,302 11,287 

Grants to States 2,814,100 2,973,600 2,884,000 

Other 78,417 73,115 79,803 

* As of 6/30/6k unless otherwise noted. 

l/ Welfare Administration established in I963, therefore, data for prior 
years not provided. Bureau fact sheets include I96O-65 data. 

2/ The FY 1965 estimate is not directly comparable to previous years 
because it excludes a proposed supplemental request of $t0T«9 
million for public assistance grants. 



II - 249 



OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER - Statistical Summary 



1/ 



ORGANIZATION 

Organizational Units and Employment (June 30, 1964) 
Name of Unit Employees 

Office of the Commissioner 77 



PERSONNEL (as of June 30) 1963 
Paid Employment 

In D. C. Area 44 



1964 



77 



FUNDS (fiscal year) (In thousands) 

1963 

Total available ; 

Appropriations $1,836 

Funds available for t 

Direct operations .... 736 
Cooperative Research or 

Demonstration Projects 1,100 



1964 

$2,480 

1,025 
1,455 



1965 (Est.) 



$2,762 



1,062 
1,700 



— ' Excludes data on employment and funds allocated from AID. Also 
excludes proposed supplemental for pay increase in F.T. 1965. 

Welfare Administration established in 1963, Therefore, data for 
prior years not provided. 



II - 250 



DIGEST OF LEGISLATION GOVERNING OPERATIONS 
OF THE WELFARE ADMINISTRATION 



Office of the Commissioner 

Specific delegated and participating functions of the Commissioner, in 
addition to the over-all statutory responsibility also delegated to her 
by the Organization Manual Chapter 9-000 are expressly or impliedly 
stated in the Social Security Act (P.L„ 271), 74th Congress, August 14, 
1935, as amended; Title VII, Sections 702, 703, 704 and Title XI, 
Sections 1102, 1106, 1110 and 1114; Agricultural Trade Development and 
Assistance Act of 1954, Section 104(k), as amended (7 U.S.C. 1704(k) ); 
Emergency Preparedness Order No. 5, January 24, 1961; Executive Order 
11001, February 20, 1962; Executive Order 10958, August 14, 1961; and 
Executive Order 10346, April 17, 1952. 

Children's Bureau 

Basic Act of 1912, as amended (42 U.S.C. Ch. 6); Social Security Act, 
Title V, as amended (42 U.S.C. Ch. 7, Sub V); Maternal and Child Health 
and Mental Retardation Planning Amendments of 1963 (P.L. 88-156, except 
sec. 5); Reorganization Plan No. 2 of 1946, effective July 16, 1946 
(60 Stat. 1095); International Health Research Act of 1960 (P.L. 86-610, 
74 Stat. 364, 22 U.S.C. 2102); Agricultural Trade Development and 
Assistance Act of 1954, Section 104(k) , as amended (7 U.S.C. 1704(k) ). 

Bureau of Family Services 

Social Security Act (P.L. 271), 74th Congress, August 14, 1935, Titles 
I, IV, VII, X, XI, XIV, and XVI, as amended (42 U.S.C. 301 et seq., 
601 et seq., 906, 1201 et seq., 1301 et seq., 1351 et seq., 1381 et seq.; 
P.L. 87-543, 76 Stat. 172; P.L. 86-571 (24 U.S.C. 321 et seq.); P.L. 474, 
81st Congress, April 19, 1950, Section 9 (relating to Navajo and Hopi 
Indians) and Section 618 of the Revenue Act of 1951, 65 Stat. 452 
(relating to public access to State public assistance records). 

Office of Juvenile Delinquency and Youth Development 

Juvenile Delinquency and Youth Offenses Control Act of 1961 (P.L. 87-274, 
42 U.S.C. 2541-2546 and P.L. 88-368). 

Cuban Refugee Program 

Migration and Refugee Assistance Act of 1962, P.L. 87-510, 76 Stat. 
121, 22 U.S.C. 2601; Executive Order 11077, January 22, 1963. 



II - 251 



Office of Aging 

PROGRAM To assist in the development of policies and programs of 
OBJECTIVES Department -wide and inter-agency scope and interest in the 
field of aging and in coordination of Department activities 
relating to the aged; conduct studies and compile statistics 
of similar scope and interest; provide public information 
services; encourage and assist in the development of research 
and programs for the training of professional personnel; and 
maintain liaison and provide consultative services with State 
and local organizations concerned with aging and with 
national and international voluntary and philanthropic groups. 

EXTENT OF More than 17% million Americans (or 9.3 percent of the 
PROBLEM population) are 65 years of age and over. Many of them are 
faced with problems of adjusting to the role of the retiree 
in a work-oriented society. For those who wish to continue 
working, paid employment is exceedingly difficult to find. 
With advancing years come increased disability and medical 
expenses. Yet for many elderly citizens, income is 
exceedingly low. The median income for a retired elderly 
couple is about $50 a week, less than half the median income 
reported for younger couples. The median income of an aged 
person living alone is approximately $20 per week. Almost 
30 percent of the elderly live in substandard housing. 

PRESENT Present emphasis is on obtaining aging programs in the 
PROGRAM communities and neighborhoods where the older people live. 
SCOPE This is being accomplished through continuing contact with, 
and assistance to, State executives on aging; by increasing 
the dissemination of information about aging and programs 
in aging to professional workers, community leaders, and 
older people themselves; by working with universities on 
curricula in social gerontology and in management and 
administration of housing facilities for older people; and 
in providing consultative services to hundreds of public, 
voluntary, and philanthropic organizations with an interest 
in aging. 

Much of the work of the Office of Aging is carried on by its 
Regional Representatives on Aging, located in the nine 
regional offices of the Department. These persons work 
closely on a day-by-day basis with State Commissions on Aging 
and other State and local agencies and officials. 



LEGAL BASIS 

SOURCE OF 
FUNDS 

ADVISORY 
GROUPS 



Authority vested in the Secretary and the Commissioner of 
Welfare. 

Annual Congressional Appropriation 



Secretary's Panel of Consultants on Aging 



II - 252 



Office of Aging 
Statistical Summary 
DIRECTOR OF PROGRAM: Donald P. Kent 
ORGANIZATION 



Unit 










Employee 


s 




Office of the Director 










7 






Research and Training Divj 


.sion 








8 






Field Services Division 










24 






Information Division 










9 

¥5 








PERSONNEL (as of June 30) 


1959 


1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 




Paid Employment-/ 


22 


^7 


50 


k2 


kk 


k3 




In D. C. area 


22 


29 


32 


25 


27 


31 




Outside D. C. area 





18 


18 


17 


17 


17 






FUNDS (fiscal year) 


1959 


1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 


1965 






(in 


thousands) 








Total Available!/ 
















Appropriation 


$1040 


$561 


$907 


$379 


$497 


$545 


$566 


Funds Available for:_/ 

















Direct operations 
White House Conference 
on Aging activities 
•(staff, tech. assist., 
conduct of conference, 
etc.) 
White House Conference 
on Aging grants to 
States 



96 



109 122 379 497 545 566 



134 



810 



452 785 



1/ Includes, for comparability, funds (and related staff) appropriated 
to the Office of the Secretary and Office of Field Administration 
for aging activities prior to 1964. In 1960 and 1961 field staff 
was supported by appropriations made to the White House Conference 
on Aging; and in 1962-1963 from appropriations made to the Office 
of Field Administration. Employment figures exclude WAE personnel. 



II - 253 



Children's Bureau 



BUREAU 
RESPONSI- 
BILITIES 



SCOPE OF 
ACTIVITIES 



To investigate and report "upon all matters pertaining to 
the welfare of children and child life among all classes 
of our people"; and to assist in extending and improving 
maternal and child health, crippled children's and child 
welfare services through grants to the States and grants 
for special projects. 

The Bureau assembles and publishes facts needed to keep 
the country informed about matters affecting the well- 
being of children; their normal growth and development; 
methods of child-rearing; physical handicaps and illnesses; 
methods of treatment; physical, social and economic condi- 
tions adversely affecting children; laws, programs and 
administration of child care and protective measures. 

The Bureau recommends and helps to establish standards 
for the care and protection of children: in hospitals, 
clinics, courts, institutions, and other child-caring 
agencies. 

It provides technical assistance to public and private 
agencies and organizations: in designing and carrying 
out research in child life; and in health and welfare 
services for children; in developing policies and im- 
proving practices in child health, child welfare, juvenile 
delinquency, and youth development programs; in appraising 
the effectiveness of child-care programs; in improving 
legislative protections. 

It administers Federal grants to State agencies for 
extending and strengthening maternal and child health, 
crippled children, and child welfare services, develops 
policies, reviews and approves State plans, provides 
technical consultation to the States concerning these 
three programs, and administers grants for special maternity 
and infant care projects. 

It also administers a program of grants to public and 
voluntary agencies and organizations and to institutions 
of higher learning for demonstration or research projects 
in the field of child welfare, and grants to institutions 
of higher learning for training of child welfare personnel. 
The 1963 amendments to the Social Security Act added grants 
for research projects relating to maternal and child health 
services and crippled children's services. 



II - 25k 



The Bureau provides leadership to the States in developing 
new and expanded services for mentally retarded children, 
develops policy guides and provides technical consultation 
to State and local health and welfare departments with re- 
spect to programs for mentally retarded children, carries 
on a program of research and of interpretation and publica- 
tion concerning mental retardation, and cooperates with 
other Federal agencies in the development of comprehensive 
national planning for mental retardation. 

The Bureau's international activities include the recruit- 
ment of specialists for service abroad under the Agency 
for International Development program, the development of 
training programs for personnel from other countries, con- 
sultation and assistance through correspondence to individuals 
and agencies in other countries, and participation in inter- 
national research grants through the Special Foreign Currency 
Program, 

BUREAU The Programs of the Bureau are: 
PROGRAMS Research in Child Life 

Maternal and Child Health and Crippled Children 

Child Welfare 

Juvenile Delinquency 



II - 255 



CHILDREN'S BUREAU-- Statistical Summary 



CHIEF OF BUREAU; Katherine Brownell Oettinger 



ORGANIZATION ; 

Unit Employees 

Division of Health Services 42 

Regional 53 

Division of Social Services 37 

Regional 26 

Division of Juvenile 

Delinquency Services 24 



Unit 

Division of Research 
Division of Reports 
Office of the Chief 
Division of Administra- 
tive Services 



Employees 

45 
26 
18 

26 

297 y 



PERSONNEL: 



(As of June 30) 1960- 



2/ 



Paid Employment 
In D.C. Area 
Outside D.C. Area 



251 

187 

64 



19611/ 



244 

178 

66 



1962 

241 

175 

66 



1963 

257 

187 

70 



1964 

297 
218 

79 



FUNDS (Fiscal Year) 



Total available 
Appropriations 

Funds available for ; 

Salaries and Expenses 
Grants for maternal 

and child welfare 
Research, training, 

or demonstration 

projects in child 

welfare 
Special project grants 

for maternity and 

infant care 
Research projects 

relating to maternal 

and child health and 

crippled children's 

services 



1960 



1961 



1962 



1963 



1964 1965 (est.) 







(In Thousands) 






$49,000 
49,000 


$54,476 
54,476 


$71,768 
71,768 


$79,738 
79,738 


$103,219 
103,219 


$132,125 
132,125 


2,500 


2,643 


2,668 


2,943 


3,776 


4,295 


46,500 


51,833 


68,750 


75,800 


89,000 


104,000 



35(4' 



995 3,943 5,830 



4/ 
5,000- 15,000 



4/ 
1,500- 3,000 



1/ Excludes positions financed by allocated funds; and advances and reimbursements. 
2/ Includes personnel and funds for the White House Conference on Children and Youth. 
3/ New program of grants in Fiscal Year 1962. 
4/ New program of grants in Fiscal Year 1964. 



II - 257 



PROGRAM 
OBJECTIVES 

EXTENT OF 
PROBLEM 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



Research Program 

To encourage and to conduct research in child life and in 
health and welfare services for children. 

A number of unanswered or partially answered questions con- 
cerning children and their needs call for increased research 
effort and emphasis, as well as for fuller utilization of 
research resources, voluntary and governmental. Programs 
and services for children would benefit by more diverse and 
more detailed statistics than present resources permit. For 
example, a vigorous campaign of education and guidance is 
required to achieve full coverage of some subjects (e.g. 
adoptions, maternal and child health services) now included 
in the Bureau 1 s Statistical Series. There is urgent need 
also for more research on child life, in order to deal more 
effectively with major problems now confronting us. The ap- 
plication of improved research techniques is also necessary 
for the improvement of child health and welfare programs. 
More effective interpretation and utilization of research 
findings in these fields are also called for. 

Research in child life is encouraged and carried on through 
(a) conducting studies of child health and welfare conditions 
and services, alone or in cooperation with States and volun- 
tary organizations; (b) promoting research through the iden- 
tification of problems for study and the provision of re- 
search consultation; (c) collecting and analyzing State and 
national statistics on child health and welfare; (d) report- 
ing on research related to child life currently under way in 
the United States and on research findings useful to parents 
and professional workers; (e) providing grants for research 
on problems related to or relevant to the provision of child 
health and welfare services; (f) encouraging special studies 
in the field of mental retardation. 



The initiation in 1962 of a program of grants for research 
and demonstration in the field of child welfare and, in 
1964 of a program of grants for research in child health 
has greatly enlarged the scope of the Bureau's research. 
Through its intramural research program, the Bureau con- 
tinues its work of collecting and/or analyzing relevant 
national statistics, of reporting on the accomplishments 
of its service programs, of encouraging research in child 
life by providing investigators with background materials 
and methodological advice, and of interpreting research find- 
ings to parents and professional workers. Through its extra- 
mural grant program it stimulates, advises on, and helps to 
finance research on problems deemed of major importance to 
the Bureau's purposes. The two programs closely interlock 
and are mutually stimulating. 



II - 258 



LEGAL 
BASIS 

SOURCE 
OF FUNDS 

ADVISORY 
GROUPS 



The Bureau's responsibility in the area of international 
research has been lodged with its International Division 
but staff members of the Research Division provide assist- 
ance from time to time. 

Basic Act of 1912 (42 U.S.C., Ch„ 6) Reorganization Act 
of 1945, effective July 16, 1946 (60 Stat. 1095). 

Appropriation — Children's Bureau (Salaries and Expenses). 



Advisory Group to the Child Welfare Research and Demonstra- 
tion Grant Program; Advisory Group to the Child Health 
Research Grant Program; Pediatric Advisors, Advisors to the 
Clearinghouse for Research in Child Life; ad hoc groups on 
various aspects of the program. 



Research Program — Statistical Summary 
DIRECTOR OF PROGRAM: Helen L. Witmer 
ORGANIZATION OF DIVISION OF RESEARCH 



Unit 


Employees 






Unit 


Employees 


Office of Director 




7 


Juvenile Delinquency 




5 


Child Health Studies 




17 


Studies Branch 






Branch 






Child 


Life Studies 




9 


Child Welfare Studies 




7 


Branch 








Branch 














45" 


PERSONNEL: (As of June 


30) 


1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 




Paid employment 
In D. C. Area 




35 
35 


34 
34 


42 
42 


41 
41 


45 
45 




FUNDS (Fiscal Year) 




1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 


1965 (est.) 










(In Thousands) 






Total available 




$274 


$315 


$349 


$376 


$413 


$529 


Appropr iat i ons 




274 


315 


349 


376 


413 


529 


Funds available for: 
















Salaries and Expenses 




274 


315 


349 


376 


413 


529 



II - 259 



Maternal and Child Health and Crippled Children's Program 

PROGRAM To encourage and assist in the extension and improvement of 
OBJECTIVES health services for mothers and children, especially in 

rural areas and in areas suffering from severe economic dis- 
tress. 



EXTENT OF 
PROBLEM 



Extension of coverage and improvement of the quality of 
services are needed throughout the country. General appli- 
cation of available knowledge could lower the infant mor- 
tality rate from 26.0 to 19.6 or lower, saving 27,400 infants 
each year. In addition, the incidence of prematurity which 
contributes disproportionately to chronic disability and 
handicapping among children could be reduced. Extension of 
comprehensive maternal and child health care to lower socio- 
economic groups in both urban and rural areas is needed. 
Though the number of orthopedically handicapped children re- 
ceiving medical service through crippled children's programs 
increases each year, children with non-orthopedic handicaps, 
who are being cared for are now more numerous and are in- 
creasing at a faster rate, as States respond to heretofore 
unmet needs of children with other types of handicapping con- 
ditions, such as epilepsy, cystic fibrosis, visual and hear- 
ing defects. Children with congenital malformations in 
crippled children's programs increased 125 percent between 
1950 and I960. 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



The extension and improvement of health services for mothers 
and children is encouraged and assisted through (a) develop- 
ing program plans, policies, guides and recommendations for 
these services; (b) providing advisory service to State and 
local agencies, public and voluntary, on technical and ad- 
ministrative aspects of medical care and health services for 
mothers and children (including program content, standards, 
methods and organization) and consultation in specialized 
medical and related fields, such as pediatrics, orthopedics, 
nursing, mental retardation, dentistry, physical therapy, 
medical social work, child psychiatry, and nutrition; (c) 
consulting with educational institutions in meeting the need 
for trained personnel for this program; (d) cooperating with 
and working with State, national and international organiza- 
tions concerned with health services for mothers and children; 
(e) administering grants to States for maternal and child 
health, and crippled children's services; (f) administering 
grants to State health and crippled children's agencies and 
to institutions of higher learning for projects that will 
contribute to the advancement of maternal and child health 
and crippled children's services with particular attention 
to mental retardation; and (g) administering special project 
grants for maternity and infant care. 



II - 260 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



SOURCE 
OF FUNDS 

ADVISORY 
GROUPS 



All 50 States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, 
the Virgin Islands, and Guam participate in the two 
grant programs for maternal and child health, and 
crippled children's services (except that Arizona is 
not participating in the crippled children's program). 

The 1963 amendments increase the opportunities for the 
development of clinical programs for the mentally re- 
tarded and provide a new medical care program for 
maternity patients with complications of pregnancy and 
their infants, in order to help reduce the incidence of 
mental retardation. 

Basic Act of 1912 (42 U. S.C., Ch.6); Social Security Act, 
Title V, Parts 1 and 2 (42 U.S.C., Ch.7, Subch. V), Re- 
organization Act of 1945, effective July 16, 1946 
(60 Stat. 1095); P.L. 88-156, (77 Stat. 273). 

Appropriation— Children's Bureau (Salaries and Expenses, 
and Grants for Maternal and Child Welfare). 

Ad hoc groups on various aspects of the program. A 
Maternity and Newborn Advisory Committee and a Technical 
Committee on Clinical Programs for Mentally Retarded 
Children were established in 1964. 



Maternal and Child Health and Crippled Children's Program—Statistical Summary 
DIRECTOR OF PROGRAM: Dr. Arthur J. Lesser 
ORGANIZATION OF DIVISION OF HEALTH SERVICES 



Unit 


Employees 




Unit 




Employees 


Office of the Director, 


10 


Administrative 






Program Services Branch 


21 


Methods 
Regional 


Branch 




11 
53 
95 


PERSONNEL: (As of June 30) 


1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 


Paid Employment 
In D. C. Area 


79 
35 


78 
32 


77 
31 


76 
30 


95 
42 


Outside D. C. Area 


44 


46 


46 


46 


53 



II - 261 



Maternal and Child Health and Crippled Children's Program— Statistical Summary 

(continued) 



FUNDS (Fiscal Year) 1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 


1965 (est.) 






(In Thousands) 






Total available $34,274 


$38,995 


$50,876 


$50,909 


$67^555 


$89,062 


Appropriations 34,274 


38,995 


50,876 


50,909 


67,555 


89,062 


Funds available for: 












Salaries and Expenses 774 


828 


876 


909 


1,055 


1,062 


MCH grants 17,500 


18,167 


25,000 


25,000 


30,000 


35,000 


CC grants 16,000 


20,000 


25,000 


25,000 


30,000 


35,000 


Special project 












grants for 












maternity and 












infant care 








5,000 


15,000 


Research projects 












relating to maternal 












and child health and 












crippled children's 












services 








1,500 


3,000 


PROGRAM STATISTICS 


1959 


1960 

(In 


1961 
Thousands) 


1962 


1963 


Crippled children's program 













Children who received physicians' services (CY) 



339 



355 



372 



385 



399 



1/ 



Expenditures (FY): Total $57,165 $62,345 


$71,047 


$78,507 


$82,809 


Federal 15,369 17,352 


19,974 


24,591 


25,312 


State and local 41,796 44,993 


51,073 


53,916 


57,497 


Maternal and child health program — ' (In 


Thousands ) 






Mothers receiving selected maternity services (CY) 






Medical clinic service 251 267 


290 


280 


271 


Nursing service 555 551 


529 


578 


534 


Children receiving selected child health 


services (CY) 






Well child conference 








service 1,520 1,516 


1,530 


1,508 


1,490 


Nursing service 3,131 3,413 


3,063 


2,994 


2,831 


Expenditures (FY) Total $75,310 $78,635 


$80,248 


$94,480 


$106,345 


Federal 16,966 17,575 


18,343 


24,407 


25,115 


State and local 58,344 61,060 


61,905 


70,073 


81,230 


1/ Estimated. 








2/ Fluctuations in these national totals reflect numerous variations in 



program emphases among the 54 States and among local health jurisdictions 
within the States. They are rather crude measures of the volume of services 
to mothers and children. For example, an adjustment in reporting procedures 
made during the current year resulted in lower numbers, not necessarily re- 
flecting a lessening of services. 

II - 262 



PROGRAM 
OBJECTIVES 

EXTENT OF 
PROBLEM 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



Child Welfare Program 

To encourage and assist in the development, extension and 
improvement of social services for children and youth. 

Extension of coverage of child welfare services and 
improvement in the quality of these services are needed 
to meet the challenge of increases in child population, 
unemployment, mobile, urban population, and the resulting 
problems of children and youth preparing for adult respon- 
sibility. The services of a full-time public child welfare 
worker are not available to 11.0 million children living 
in 1,338 (42%) of the nation's 3,211 counties. Even in 
counties with workers available, services are not adequate 
in variety, quantity, or quality to meet children's needs. 
A total of 15 million children under 18 have mothers who 
work. Four million of these children are under 6 and 
another five million are between 6-11 years of age. Day 
care services are grossly lacking in most communities. 
More supportive services to children in their own homes, 
more foster care facilities and other specialized resources 
are needed in every State. 

The establishment, extension, and improvement of social 
services for children and youth is encouraged and assisted 
through (a) developing program plans, policies and guides; 

(b) providing advice and consultation to State and local 
agencies, public and voluntary, on technical and administra- 
tive aspects of social services for children and youth, 
including standards, methods, organization, staff development, 
and program content, e.g., social services to children in 
their own homes, foster care in foster family homes or 
institutions, adoption, services to unmarried mothers and 
mentally retarded children, homemaker services, day care 
services, and protection for neglected and abused children; 

(c) consulting with educational institutions and social 
agencies in meeting the need for trained child welfare 
personnel; (d) cooperating with and working with State, 
national and inter-national organizations, and citizen's 
groups concerned with social services for children and 
youth; (e) administering grants to State public welfare 
agencies for child welfare services including earmarked 
funds for day care services; (f) administering grants to 
institutions of higher learning for projects for training 
of personnel for the child welfare field. 

All 50 States, the District of Columbia, the Virgin Islands, 
Puerto Rico and Guam receive Federal grant funds for child 
welfare services. 



II - 263 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



SOURCE OF 
FUNDS 

ADVISORY 
GROUPS 



Basic Act' of 1912 (42 U.S.C., Ch. 6); Social Security 
Act, title V, Part 3, (42 U.S.C., Ch. 7, Subch. V); 
Reorganization Act of 1945, effective July 16, 1946 
(60 Stat. 1095). 

Appropriation — Children's Bureau (Salaries and Expenses 
and Grants for Maternal and Child Welfare). 

Ad hoc groups advise on various aspects of the child 
welfare program. An advisory group, not to exceed nine 
members, advises Bureau on administration of project 
grants for training. 



Child Welfare Program--Statistical Summary 
DIRECTOR OF PROGRAM: Mildred M. Arnold 
ORGANIZATION OF DIVISION OF SOCIAL SERVICES 



Unit 


Employees 


Unit 


Employees 


Office of Director 
Program Development 
Branch 


6 
17 




Program Operations 

Branch 14 
Regional 26 

63 


PERSONNEL: (As of June 30) 


I960 


1961 1962 1963 1964 


Paid employment 
In D. C. Area 
Outside D. C. Area 




47 
27 
20 


45 47 
25 27 
20 20 


56 63 
32 37 
24 26 


FUNDS (Fiscal Year) 


1960 


1961 


1962 1963 
(In Thousands) 


1964 1965 (est.) 


Total available 
Appropriations 


$13,438 
13,438 


$14,145 
14,145 


$19^583 $27,383 
19,583 2/, 383 


$33,647 $40,616 
33,647 40,616 


Funds available for: 

Salaries and Expenses 438 
CWS grants 13,000 
Research, training, or 
demonstration 


479 
13,666 


483 588 
18,750 25,800 


704 786 
29,000 34,000 


projects in 
child welfare 






1/ 
350 _ 995 


3,943 5,830 



1/ Does not include training. Grants for training personnel in the field 
of child welfare were first made available in May 1963 through a 
supplemental appropriation. 



II - 26k 



Child Welfare—Statistical Summary (continued) 



PROGRAM STATISTICS 


1959 


1960 


1961 


1962 1963 






(in thousands) 






Children receiving public 344 


383 y 


404 


423 


457 


child welfare 












services - . 
(March 31) -' 






















Expenditures (FY): Total 


$184,500 


$211^100 


$224,100 


$246,000 


$267,800 


Federal 
State I' 


11,900 


13,000 


13,700 


17,800 


26,100 


95,100 


110,000 


116,700 


128,200 


135,800 


Local y 


77,500 


88,100 


93,700 


100,000 


105,900 


Professional public 












child welfare 












employees ±' 












Total (as of June 30) 


7,026 


7,556 


8,149 


8,724 


9,348 


Caseworkers 


5,287 


5,689 


6,133 


6,552 


7,123 


Counties served by 












public child welfare 












workers 












Number of counties 


1,741 


1,719 


1,746 


1,762 


1,873 


Percent of total U.; 


s. 










counties 


55 


54 


54 


55 


58 



1/ National estimates based on reports from States, 

2/ Statistics for 1960 and later years are not comparable with figures for 
earlier years. Beginning in 1960 the figures include children for whom 
the agency makes only a payment and for whom the agency has legal custody only. 



II - 265 



PROGRAM 
OBJECTIVES 



EXTENT OF 
PROBLEM 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



Juvenile Delinquency Program 

To promote development, extension, and improvement of 
State and local programs in the control and treatment 
of juvenile delinquency. 

Continuing a long time trend, juvenile delinquency court 
cases in 1962 increased 10 percent over previous years. 
Police arrests of juveniles have risen each year for the 
past fourteen years. Their increase has been greater than 
the increase in the juvenile population over the same period. 
Based on FBI data, it is estimated that the police arrested 
over 1.2 million juveniles in 1963 or about 4.4 percent of 
the juvenile population, aged 10 through 17. This ia an 
all-time high. It is estimated that from three to four 
million young people will be referred to our juvenile courts 
in the next decade because of delinquent behavior. More 
than half of the counties in the United States fail to offer 
probation services for juveniles. Almost three times the 
present number of probation officers are needed to handle 
the present workload if the recognized standards are to be 
met. Only about one-tenth of the present probation officers 
have full specialized training. Most of the approximately 
280 detention homes and 229 public training schools caring 
for delinquent youth are over-crowded and staffed by-and- large 
by unskilled, untrained people. 

Development, extension, and improvement of State and local 
programs in the field of juvenile delinquency is encouraged 
through (a) providing leadership in the development of 
national, State and local programs for control and treat- 
ment of juvenile delinquency; (b) providing technical aid and 
advisory services to public and voluntary agencies and others, 
on standards and guides, methods, content, organization and 
coordination of such program (including police services, 
juvenile court and probation services, institutional care 
and community planning for delinquent youth); (c) assisting 
in planning training programs of professional and non- 
professional staff providing services to delinquent youth 
in States and local communities. 



Every State has some provision for the care and treatment of 
delinquent youth but most of these services are at the local 
level. There are gaps in the quality of services provided 
and coordination of services is generally lacking. 



II - 266 



LEGAL 
BASIS 

SOURCE OF 
FUNDS 

ADVISORY 
GROUPS 



Basic Act of 1912 (42 U.S.C., Ch. 6). Reorganization Act 
of 1945, effective July 16, 1946 (60 Stat. 1095). 

Appropriation—Children's Bureau (Salaries and Expenses). 



Various ad hoc groups are called together to consider dif- 
ferent aspects of the juvenile delinquency program such as 
training of personnel in the correctional field. 



Juvenile Delinquency Program — Statistical Summary 
DIRECTOR OF PROGRAM; Philip G. Green 



ORGANIZATION OF DIVISION OF JUVENILE DELINQUENCY SERVICE 






Unit 


Employees 




Unit 


Employees 


Office of Director 
Technical Aid Branch 


4 
13 




Community 

Branch 
Training 


Service 
Branch 




3 

4 
24 


PERSONNEL: (As of June 30) 


1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 




Paid employment 
In D. C. Area 


15 
15 


20 
20 


18 
18 


22 
22 


24 
24 




FUNDS (Fiscal Year) 


1960 


1961 


1962 1963 
(In Thousands) 


1964 


1965 (est.) 


Total available 
Appropriations 


$164 
164 


$200 
200 


$231 
231 


$249 
249 


$296 
296 


$329 
329 


Funds available for: 

Salaries and Expenses 


164 


200 


231 


249 


296 


329 


PROGRAM STATISTICS: (CY) 


1958 


1959 
(In 


1960 
Thousands) 


1961 1962 



Juvenile Delinquency court 
cases, U.S.: 1/ 



Including traffic- 
Excluding traffic — - 


703 
473 


y 


483 


813 
510 


801 867 
503 555 


3/ 
Child Population, U.S.- 

(Aged 10 through 17) - 


23,443 




24,607 


25,364 


26,023 26,936 



1/ Trend based on data from a representative national sample of juvenile courts. 

Data for Alaska and Hawaii are included for the first time in 1960 and do not 

materially affect the trend. 
2/ Much of the increase is accounted for by an administrative change in one 

large State in the method of handling juvenile traffic cases. 
3/ Trend based on data from Bureau of Census, U.S. Department of Commerce 

(Current Population Reports, Series P-25). 

II - 267 



Bureau of Family Services 

BUREAU To administer the Federal-State grant-in-aid programs of public 
RESPONSI- assistance established by the Social Security Act and its amend- 
BILITY ments — Old-Age Assistance and Medical Assistance for the Aged 

(Title i), Aid and Services to Needy Families with Children (Ti- 
tle IV), Aid to the Blind (Title X), and Aid to the Permanently 
and Totally Disabled (Title XIV). A new Title XVT which permits 
combining the programs covered by Titles I, X, and XIV under a 
single plan for Aid to the Aged, Blind, or Disabled and Medical 
Assistance for the Aged was added to the Social Security Act 
in 1962. 

Tq collect and interpret information and participate in studying 
and making recommendations as to the most effective method pro- 
viding economic security to needy people and as to changes in 
Federal legislation and matters of policy which may be necessary - 
and desirable. 

To provide for .hospitalization and services to repatriated mental- 
ly ill U. S. nationals until arrangements can be made for assump- 
tion of responsibility by State of residence or family; to develop 
plans for and provide temporary assistance to U. S. citizens and 
their dependents who are identified by the Department of State as 
having returned, or been brought back, to this country because of 
destitution, illness, war, threat of war, invasion, or similar 
crisis and who are without available resources. 

In accordance with the concept of building civil defense capabili- 
ties into existing government agencies and related peacetime pro- 
grams, the Bureau has been assigned responsibility, working with 
the Children's Bureau, to develop an integrated national program 
of essential welfare aid and services to assure availability of 
the necessities of life to the homeless and others in need of help 
in the event of enemy attack or the threat of enemy attack. 

The Bureau also participates in departmental activities concerning 
refugees and immigrants; and assists in work of the International 
Office of the Welfare Administration. 

SCOPE OF Grants are made in accordance with the Social Security Act; other 
ACTIVITIES funds are advanced or reimbursed to agencies and organizations in 
connection with assistance for U. S. nationals or citizens re- 
turned from foreign countries. The Bureau assists States in the 
application of Federal requirements to their programs and in im- 
proving the programs; obtains nationwide information and know- 
ledge as a basis for reporting and advising the Department, the 
Congress, and others; and cooperates with national public and 
private agencies and other organizations with a view toward under- 
standing and support of the program. 



II - 268 



Since enactment of the Public Welfare Amendments of 1962 in July 
1962, major emphasis of the Bureau has been on implementation of 
the some Ik substantial and diversified changes to improve the 
public assistance programs called for by the legislation. In 
general, the new legislation made available more Federal funds 
for rehabilitation and other services to recipients and for the 
training of caseworkers and other staff in the skills and services 
that will help free families from reliance on public assistance. 
They authorized Federal contributions to community work and train- 
ing projects and provided useful new incentives for job-seeking by 
those capable of work. A provision ,for demonstration projects was 
included to permit experimentation by the States and localities 
in improved methods of public assistance administration. These 
amendments, generally considered as a major "breakthrough" in 
public welfare, expressed the Congressional conviction that public 
assistance can and will do more to rehabilitate dependent indi- 
viduals and to lessen or prevent continuing dependency. 

Through joint Federal-State-local efforts, there is continuing 
empbhsis on rehabilitative and preventive services, stressing 
self-support and self -care and strengthened family life for 
needy recipients whenever possible; strengthening of staff de- 
velopment programs; and achieving more efficient and economical 
program administration. The nature of many of the 1962 amendments 
is such that full implementation by the States will require a 
period of years. There is a continuing need for the Bureau to 
develop new and revised policy, standard-setting, and guide mate- 
rials; to provide counselling and other technical assistance to 
individual States and on a nationwide basis on methods of imple- 
menting the amendments and progressively improving operations to 
meet their goals. 

Several other program areas of special concern that were accorded 
high priority in Bureau work with the States in 1964 will continue 
to receive considerable attention. For example, as an outgrowth 
of the special AFDC Eligibility Review in 1963 directed by the 
Senate (and, in addition to other remedial actions immediately 
initiated following the AFDC review), a new system is now in ef- 
fect for every program which requires each State to review and 
control the processing and validity of case actions by local 
agencies. 

Another recent development relates to Bureau participation in a 
visit made to each State public assistance agency in June 1964 by 
a 3-person team of Welfare Administration Regional Representatives 
to explore ways in which existing public welfare resources at both 
the State and Federal levels might be used more effectively. Cur- 
rent situations in the States, <B»jof obstacles to full utilization 
of Federal resources and current planning for greater utilization 
of existing resources were reviewed. 



II - 269 



Major efforts are being exerted to help States take advantage of 
the 1962 amendments authorizing federal funds (and/or waiver of 
State plan requirements) for demonstration projects designed to 
promote the objectives of the public assistance programs. Thirty- 
six projects were approved in fiscal year 196k> ranging in diver- 
sity from back-to-school and summer job programs for needy teenagers 
to demonstrations on use of homemaker services. 

ADVISOR? WAE and other consultants, representing medical and para-medical 
GROUPS areas, assist the Bureau individually or collectively on medical 

aspects of the programs; ad hoc groups are used on other program 

matters. 

BUREAU Fact sheets follow on the grant-in-aid programs of Old-Age Assist- 
PROGRAMS ance, Medical Assistance for the Aged, Aid and Services to Needy 
Families with Children, Aid to the Blind, and Aid to the Perma- 
nently and Totally Disabled; on Civil Defense Emergency Welfare 
Services; and on Assistance for Repatriated U. S. Nationals or 
Citizens. It should be noted that as of June 30, 19&-, plans 
had been approved for 22 States that elected to operate their 
"adult" public assistance programs (i.e., all programs except Aid 
and Services to Needy Families with Children) as a single plan 
under title XVI of the Social Security Act. A separate fact sheet 
is not presented for combined programs under title XVI; rather, 
for comparability, information on the individual fact sheets and 
the statistical summary is related to each category of assistance 
without regard to whether the State plan is operated under title 
XVI. 



II - 270 



BUREAU OF FAMILY SERVICES 
DIRECTOR OF BUREAU ; Fred H. Steininger 

ORGANIZATION 



Statistical Summary 



1/ 



Unit 
Office of the Director 
Division of Administration 
Division of Technical Training 
Division of Program Operations 
(Dep'l - 54; Field - 130) 



Employees Unit Employees 

63 Division of Medical Care Standards 18 

53 Division of Program Statistics & Analysis 46 

15 Division of Welfare Services 47 

184 Division of State Adm. & Fiscal Standards 23 

Total W9 



1962 
166 



388 



PERSONNEL (as of June 30) I960 

Paid employment 271 
In D. C. area 181 
Outside D. C. area 90 



FUNDS (fiscal year) 

Total available 2 / 

For Direct Operations . 
For Grants to States-i/ 



I960 



1961 

328 
22T 
107 



106 



1961 



1962 



107 



1*9 

J20 



196T 1965 lEstHi / 



"1933 
(in thousands) 

$2,039,845 $2,179,727 $2,404,692 $2,742,125 $2,889,556 $2,785,364 
2,345 2,727 3,492 3,825 4,956 5,364 

2,037,500 2,177,000 2,401,200 2 f 738,300 2,884,600 2,780,000 



1963 1964 (Prel. ) 



PROGRAM STATISTICS 
Expenditures (F. Y. basis) 
Total Federal, State, 
and local 

Federal share—total^/ 
OAA 
MAA 
AFDC 
AB 
APTD 
Demonstration Projects 



1960 






1 W^ 

in millions) 




$4,573 

2,729 

33l 

157 

920 

50 

24l 




(June) 



(in thousands) 
6,215 6££ 



Avg t No. of Recipients 
Total 
OAA 

MAA 
AFDC 
AB 
APTD 



5,798 
2,420 

2,930 
109 
339 



5^851 
2,359 

3,023 
108 
363 



2~296 
46 

3,383 
106 
384 



2,237 
103 

3,688 
100 
417 



6,829 
2,199 

136 

3,934 

98 

462 



7^182 
2,182 

187 

4,215 

97 

501 



Average Payment 
OAA 
MAA 
AFDC 
AB 
APTD 



(June) 6/ 



$64.76 $67.90 



28.39 
69.04 
63.37 



29.08 
72.81 
65.74 



$67.85 

200.59 

30.30 

73.36 

68.19 



$72.55 

171.36 

31.48 

77.47 
72.00 



$76.92 
195.20 

30.95 
81.30 
74.82 



$78.44 

196.84 

32.51 

84.09 
78.50 



Est. State/local employees (June) 

50,900 52,100 53,900 59,300 65,500 Unavailable 

1/ Excludes: data on Civil Defense Emergency Welfare Services (see separate fact sheet), 

2 positions (and funds) financed each year by AID, and 5 positions (and funds) beginning 

in 1963 related to refugee assistance work. 
2/ The FY 1965 estimate is not directly comparable to previous years because it excludes 

a proposed supplemental request of $407-9 million for publii assistance gr&mts. 
3/ Appropriations — adjusted to reflect "in and out" transfers. 
4/ Old-Age Assistance (OAA)j Medical Assistance for the Aged (MAA); Aid to Families with 

Dependent Children (AFDC); Aid to the Blind (AB); and Aid to the Permanently and 

Totally Disabled (APTD). 
5/ Includes Federal share of collections of approximately $20 million for each year. 
6/ Represents total payment to recipient from Federal, State, and local funds. 

II - 271 



Old-Age Assistance (OAA) 



PROGRAM 
OBJECTIVE - 



EXTENT OP 
PROBLEM 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



To assist aged needy individuals by providing financial assist- 
ance and medical care, and appropriate welfare services to help 
them to attain or retain capability for self -care insofar as 
practicable. 

Approximately 2,199*000 persons, or 12 1 *- persons out of each 
1,000 age 65 and over, received old-age assistance in June 1963-- 
about 12 percent of the population age 65 and over. The majority 
of the needy aged live in small communities or rural areas where 
almost no other organized community welfare services exist. The 
median age of recipients is j6.k years; there is a high incidence 
of chronic illness; many suffer from loss of family and friends 
and from general exclusion from employment opportunities irrespec- 
tive of their skills or physical vigor. Nearly a half million 
are bedridden or need substantial care from others because of 
physical or mental impairment; about 200,000 live in institutions. 

There is continuing Bureau emphasis, through consultation, issu- 
ance of policy and informational material, and other work to help 
State agencies develop standards of assistance and welfare services 
to more adequately meet the special needs of aged persons. Special 
emphasis on preventing and reducing dependency through the provi- 
sion of rehabilitative and other social services, called for by 
the Public Welfare Amendments of 19&2, is an area to receive major 
attention for the foreseeable future. Legislative changes in i960 
and 1961 recognized the increased cost of medical care and provided 
for States to extend comprehensive medical services to persons re- 
ceiving old-age assistance by improving or making provision for 
medical care under this program; achieving the purpose of this leg- 
islation is another Bureau emphasis. Other current work includes 
assistance to States in planning for older people to return to 
their communities from institutions; participation in a joint EEW- 
HHFA Task Force on housing considerations for the aged. All 50 
States, the District of Columbia, Guam, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin 
Islands have the Old-Age Assistance program. 

The Public Welfare Amendments of 1962 included provisions for (l) 
an increase of about $k per month per recipient in the Federal 
share of assistance payments to the aged; (2) exemption, at the 
option of States, of income earned by recipients of old-age assist- 
ance, up to a TwyriTmrm of $30, in determining the need of a recip- 
ient; and (3) an increase from 50 percent to 75 percent in the 
Federal share of the State and local costs of (a) providing preven- 
tive and rehabilitative services, as defined by the Secretary of 
HEW, and (b) training State and local personnel if prescribed serv- 
ices are being provided. 

Social Security Act (P.L. 271), 7*«th Congress, August Ik, 1935* 
Titles I (or XVT) and XI as amended Q& U.S.C. 301 et seq. (or 
1381 et seq.), and 1301 et seq.); P.L. hlh, 8lst Cong., Sec. 9 
(relating to Navajo and Hopi Indians); Sec. 6l8 of the Revenue 
Act of 1951, 65 Stat. 569 (public access to records). 



II - 273 



PROGRAM 
OBJECTIVE 



EXTENT OF 
PROBLEM 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



Medical Assistance for the Aged (MAA) 

To assist in providing medical services and appropriate social 
services to low-income older citizens not receiving Old-Age 
Assistance whose income and resources may be sufficient for their 
maintenance needs but insufficient to meet the cost of necessary 
medical services. 

This program, first authorized in October I960, reflects the Na- 
tion's concern for a large segment of the older population who, 
because of limited income, are unable to pay for adequate medical 
care. These costs, often unpredictable and sometimes very heavy, 
present a special problem for this age group where there is a 
high incidence of illness; many live on reduced retirement in- 
come, and, while otherwise they may be self-sufficient, help is 
needed in meeting costs of medical care. 

Emphasis during the current year has continued en assisting States 
to set up new or improved medical care programs. Considerable 
interpretation and advice to State agencies is requested and pro- 
vided in this area. Continual attention to policy issues and 
development of information and policy materials pertaining to this 
program is necessary. Substantial progress has been made and ad- 
ditional work is underway on the development of standards and 
guides to help States evaluate and improve their medical programs, 
a specific responsibility set forth in the legislation* Virtually 
all areas of work relating to the aging include medical care con- 
siderations—for example, there have been a number of institutes 
on the problems and needs of the aged, and others are planned by 
Bureau staff, where medical care comprises a large part of the 
program. 

Under the Public Welfare Amendments of 1962, 75 percent Federal 
matching is available in this program for certain services pre- 
scribed by the Secretary and for staff training activities if 
prescribed services are being provided for recipients of Old-Age 
Assistance. 

A total of 37 jurisdictions had the program in effect as of 
June 30, 1964; 9 more States have enacted authorizing legisla- 
tion; 1 other State has legislation in process to authorize the 
program. 

Social Security Act (P.L. 271), 7lrth Cong., August Ik, 1935, 
Titles I (or XVI) and XI, as amended (k2 U.S.C. 301 et seq. (or 
1381 et seq.), and 1301 et seq.). 



II - 274 



Aid to the Blind (AB) 

PROGRAM To assist in providing financial assistance to needy blind indi- 
OBJECTIVE victuals and in helping them as far as practicable to retain or 
attain capability for self-support or self -care. 

EXTENT OF Blindness is a serious physical handicap. Many blind persons must 
PROBLEM depend on others for both personal and financial support. In June 
1963> approximately 98,000 persons were receiving aid to the blind. 
The median age of a blind person receiving assistance is 6l years. 
Most recipients are totally blind or have very limited vision. 
States usually provide aid to the blind only to persons whose vi- 
sion with correcting glasses is no better than 20/200 in the 
better eye. The major causes of blindness of recipients of this 
program are cataract, atrophy of optic nerve, glaucoma, and dis- 
orders of the cornea, chorioid, and retina. 

PRESENT Id addition to providing financial assistance, States are encour- 
PROGRAM aged to furnish services directed toward helping blind recipients 
SCOPE to achieve personal and economic independence to the extent possi- 
ble—for example, by directing Increased attention to furnishing 
services for the blind designed to help them make maximum use of 
their capacities; to help the blind person and his family maintain 
family solidarity; and to make maximum use of available and perti- 
-tt community resources. The States, in administering this pro- 
t--am, maintain close cooperation with State vocational rehabilita- 
tion agencies and other agencies to further this objective. The 
Bureau issues policy and information materials and provides con- 
sultation to the State agencies. Medical guides and standards 
prepared by the Bureau include materials relating to blindness. 

The Public Welfare Amendments of 1962 included provisions for (l) 
exemption of additional income and resources (in determining need 
in the aid to the blind program) that are related to rehabilitation 
costs; (2) an Increase of about $4 per month per recipient in the 
Federal share of assistance payments to the blind; and (3) an In- 
crease from 50 percent to 75 percent in the Federal share of the 
State and local costs of (a) providing preventive and rehabilita- 
tive services, as defined by the Secretary of HEW", and (b) training 
State and local personnel if prescribed services are being provided. 

All 50 States, the District of Columbia, Guam, Puerto RLco, and 
the Virgin Islands have Federally-aided programs for aid to the 
blind. 

LEGAL Social Security Act (P.L. 271), 7*-th Cong., August Ik, 1935 , Titles 
BASIS X (or XVI) and XI, as amended (h2 U.S.C. 1201 et seq. (1381 et 
seq..) and 1301 et seq..); P.L. kfk, 8lst Cong., Sec. 9 (relating 
to Navajo and Bopi Indians); Sec. 6l8 of the Revenue Act of 1951, 
65 Stat. 569 (relating to public access to State public assistance 
records). 



II - 275 



Aid and Services to Needy Families with Children (AFDC) i/ 

PROGRAM To assist in providing needy children with financial assistance; 

OBJECTIVE encouraging the care of dependent children in their own homes 

or in the homes of relatives; helping such relatives attain the 
TrcyytTmim of self-support and independence consistent with main- 
tenance of continuing parental care and protection; and strength- 
ening family life. 

EXTENT OP Of each 1,000 children under age 18, k2 were receiving aid in 
PROBLEM June 1963 in about 963,000 families (including 2,952,000 children 
under 18 and 983,000 needy adult caretakers, or 3*935*000 persons). 
The father is dead in about 8 percent of the families; incapaci- 
tated in 18 percent; absent because of divorce, separation, 
desertion, unmarried parenthood or imprisonment in nearly 67 per- 
cent; and unemployed in 5 percent. Over 75 percent of the children 
are under 13 years of age— important years in molding young lives. 
Total income, including assistance, for about k6 percent of all 
AFDC families averaged about $kQ less per month than requirements 
determined under State assistance standards; in 112,000 families, 
the unmet need was $50 or more. Almost three-fifths of all AFDC 
families live in standard metropolitan statistical areas. The 
median length of time since the most recent opening for AFDC cases 
is 2.1 years. 

Several factors that influence the growth of this program include: 
(l) economic declines, such as in 1960-61, accompanied by high 
unemployment rates (this recession spurred new Federal legislation, 
effective in May 19&1, extending the AFDC program to include fami- 
lies with children of unemployed parents); (2) continued rapid 
growth in the child population (in July 1963 there were 70.0 mil- 
lion children in the U.S. under age 18 compared with kQ.3 million 
in 1950 and kl.k million in 19*1-0); (3) a substantial increase in 
the total number of families in the population; and (k) a comparable 
increase in the number of families headed by women and the persist- 
ence of an average income level for Such families much below that 
for families headed by men. 

While the OASDI program has reduced very substantially the need 
for assistance among children whose fathers are dead, it has been 
less effective in reducing the need for assistance among children 
whose parents are physically or mentally handicapped. 

PRESENT Major attention continues on implementing the Public Welfare 
PROGRAM Amendments of 1962 that affect this program. These amendments in- 
SCOPE eluded provisions for (1) an increase from 50 percent to 75 
percent in the Federal share of the State and local costs of 
(a) providing preventive and rehabilitative services, as defined 
by the Secretary of HEW, and (b) training State and local person- 
nel, if prescribed services are being provided; (2) extension for 

l7 A shorter title is provided for assistance furnished under this program: 
Aid to Families with Dependent Children. 



II - 276 



another 5 years (to June 30, 196Y) of a provision for aiding 
dependent children of unemployed parents that had been scheduled 
to expire June 30, 19&2; (3) making permanent the temporary 
provision for aiding certain children in foster family care; 
(k) permitting (through June 30, 1967) AFDC payments in a limited 
number of cases to he made to an individual concerned with the 
welfare of a child if it is determined that the child's relative 
is not using the payment properly; and (5) use (through June 30, 
1967) °* Federal funds in payments to adult recipients of AFDC 
vho are assigned to community work and training projects . 

Considerable emphasis is directed to provision of rehabilitative 
and other social services so as to prevent and reduce dependency 
wherever possible. This area is especially significant for this 
program and must receive major attention for the foreseeable future. 
The change in the name of the program provided by the 1962 amend- 
ments (formerly it was Aid to Dependent Children) signifies the 
stress being placed on bringing more constructive social services 
into its administration. 

All 50 States, the District of Columbia, Guam, Puerto Rico, and 
the Virgin Islands have this Federally-aided program. As of 
June 30, 196k, 18 of these jurisdictions included aid to children 
of unemployed parents in their programs; 10 of these 18 States 
also provided community work and training to unemployed adults in 
their programs. 

LEGAL Social Security Act (P.L. 271), 74th Cong., August Ik, 1935, 
BASIS Titles 17 and XI, as amended (k2 U.S.C. 601 et seq., and 1301 
et seq,.); P.L. 87-543, Sec. l<A(b), Sec. 105(c) (relating to 
expenditures before October 1, 1962, for community work and 
training programs), and Sees. 155(b), as amended by P.L. 88- 3k5, 
and 202(e) (establishing effective dates); P.L. h-jk, 8lst Cong., 
Sec. 9 (relating to Navajo and Hop! Indians); See. 6l8 of the 
Revenue Act of 1951, 65 Stat. 569 (relating to public access to 
State public assistance records). 



n - 277 



PROGRAM 
OBJECTIVE 



EXTENT OF 
PROBLEM 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



Aid to the Permanently and Totally Disabled (APTD) 

To assist in providing financial assistance to needy individuals 
18 years of age or older who are permanently and totally disabled 
and appropriate welfare services to such individuals to help them 
attain or retain capability for self-support or self-care as far 
as practicable. 

Approximately lj.62,000 persons received aid to the permanently and 
totally disabled in June 1963. Most recipients are in late middle 
life j about half are between 55 and 6k years of agej more than one- 
tenth are under 35. The median age is 55. The most frequently 
diagnosed impairment is heart disease, but most recipients have 
more than one impairment. About 3 out of 10 are housebound. 
Many have had their impairment for a long period of years with 
accompanying emotional and physical strain and often with threats 
to family stability. In general, "permanently and totally dis- 
abled" means that the individual has some permanent physical or 
mental impairment, disease or loss, that substantially precludes 
him from engaging in useful occupations within his competence. 

The nature of this program requires that primary and continuing 
attention be given to the rehabilitative potentialities of dis- 
abled recipients. This emphasis was reaffirmed in the Public 
Welfare Amendments of 1962. Policy, informational and technical 
materials are developed and provided State agencies on the many 
aspects of administration of this relatively new program. The 
Bureau cooperates with public and private health and vocational 
rehabilitation organizations and encourages State public assist- 
ance agencies and other organizations to assure that every indi- 
vidual for whom vocational rehabilitation is feasible will have 
the opportunity. Another primary concern is improved medical care 
for disabled recipients. 

The Public Welfare Amendments of 1962 included provisions for (1) 
an increase of about $h per month per recipient in the Federal 
share of assistance payments in this program; and (2) an increase 
from 50 percent to 75 percent in the Federal share of the State 
and local costs of (a) providing preventive and rehabilitative 
services, as defined by the Secretary of HEW, and (b) training 
State and local personnel if prescribed services are being 
provided. 

Forty-nine States (all except Nevada), the District of Columbia, 
Guam, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands now have this program. 

Social Security Act (P.L. 271), 7l*th Cong., August ll±, 1935, Ti- 
tles XIV (or XVI) and XI, as amended (k2 U.S.C. 1351 et seq. (or 
1381 et seq.), and 1301 et seq.)j Sec. 6l8 of the Revenue Act of 
1951, 65 Stat. 569 (relating to public access to State public 
assistance records). 



II - 278 



Assistance for Repatriated United States Nationals 



PROGRAM To provide for hospitalization and services to repatriated men- 
OBJECTIVE tally ill U. S. nationals until arrangements can be made for 

assumption of responsibility by State of residence or family; to 
develop plans for and provide temporary assistance to U. S. citi- 
zens and their dependents who are identified by the Department of 
State as having returned, or been brought back, to this country 
because of destitution, illness, war, threat of war, invasion, or 
similar crisis and who are without available resources. This 
program is limited to assistance after arrival at port of entry. 

EXTENT OP The number of Waited States citizens in foreign countries has in- 
PROBLEM creased considerably in recent years; some have been away from 
this country so long that their States of residence or domicile 
are uncertain. For many years prior to commencement of Federal 
financial assistance in fiscal year 1$62 the needs of destitute 
or sick (including mentally ill) U. S. citizens who returned to 
this country without available resources presented a problem to 
State welfare and voluntary agencies in port cities. In the event 
of international crisis or war, it may be necessary to evacuate 
U. S. citizens from countries or areas where their lives are en- 
dangered. Large numbers of people may need simultaneously to 
leave foreign locations under pressing conditions and a mechanism 
is needed to provide emergency assistance to them when they reach 
the United States and to assure their prompt movement from crowded 
ports of entry. 

PRESENT The law covering services and hospitalization for mentally ill 
PROGRAM nationals returned to the U. S. from foreign countries is perma- 
SCOPE nent legislation. The law covering assistance to repatriates in 
general carries an expiration date (see "recent changes" below). 
Both segments of the program are financed entirely from Federal 
funds. Wherever possible, State, local, and voluntary welfare 
agencies are used in their administration as agents of the Federal 
government in accordance with policies and procedures issued by 
the Bureau of Family Services. These agencies may be reimbursed 
or receive advances for expenditures under the program, including 
any extra identifiable administrative cost3 (in general, admin- 
istrative costs have not been claimed). Repayments from repatri- 
ates (or their families, estates, etc.) may be obtained whenever 
possible. There are a number of procedural protections to safe- 
guard the rights of repatriates returned because of mental illness. 

Repatriates aided under this program are referred to the Bureau of 
Family Services by the Department of State. The Bureau makes 
arrangements with the appropriate State welfare agencies for recep- 
tion on arrival in the United States, and such other assistance as 
may be needed. Assistance may be for maintenance (including food, 
clothing, and housing), for transportation, for medical care (in- 
cluding care and treatment in hospitals for mental illness), and 
for other goods and services necessary for health and welfare. 



II - 279 



Most of the mentally ill repatriates assisted under this program 
have been hospitalized in Saint Elizabeths Hospital in Washington, 
D. C. There were 54 patients being cared for on June 30, 
1964, compared to 5 in U. S. Public Health and State and local 
hospitals that provide care for the mentally ill. Of the 54 in 
Saint Elizabeths, 44 had been placed there under 2 laws in effect 
(covering mentally ill repatriates from Canada and Foreign Service 
personnel) before the Bureau's program became operative. The 2 
groups of patients previously hospitalized in Saint Elizabeths 
were blanketed in under the law administered by the Bureau. 

Most of the persons aided to date under the law covering "general" 
repatriates (Section 1113 of the Social Security Act) have been 
from Cuba and living primarily in Florida. A continuous decline, 
however, has occurred since 1962 in the number of repatriates from 
Cuba requiring assistance. 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



The authority for assisting persons repatriated for reasons other 
than mental illness makes it clear that assistance should be of 
limited duration. As a result, the current Bureau policy on dura- 
tion of assistance is as follows: temporary assistance may be 
furnished only for 12 months from the month of a repatriate's 
arrival in the United States, unless he is handicapped in obtain- 
ing self-support or self -care for such reasons as age, disability, 
or lack of vocational preparation. In such cases temporary assist- 
ance may be extended upon prior authorization by the Bureau, but 
not in excess of six months. 

Work is continuous on maintenance (following the initial work of 
preparing and issuing) of standby plans and procedures for recep- 
tion in this country and temporary assistance as required by U. S. 
citizen noncombatant evacuees from foreign countries in event of 
international crises. This is a continuing responsibility under 
authority of Section 1113 of the Social Security Act. Bureau of 
Family Services* plans must be coordinated with the overall world- 
wide plans for the protection of U. S. citizens as developed and 
maintained by the Department of State, Washington Liaison Group, 
with the collateral plans of the Army, Navy, and Air Force, and 
with pertinent parts of nationwide civil defense plans for emer- 
gency operations. 

Social Security Act (P.L. 27l), 74th Congress, August 14, 1935> 
title XI, Sec. 1113, as amended (42 U.S.C. 1313); P.L. 86-571 
(24 U.S.C. 321 et seq.). 



RECENT The original limitation in Section 1113 of the Social Security 
CHANGES Act that "No temporary assistance may be provided under this 
section after June 30, 1962," has twice been extended. The 
most recent extension, by P. L. 88-347, enacted June 30, 1964, 
limits assistance to the group of "general" repatriates aided 
under Section 1113 to June 30, 1967. 



II - 280 



Statistical Summary — Assistance for Repatriated United States Nationals 

DIRECTOR OF BUREAU : Fred H. Steininger 

FUNDS (fiscal year) 1962 1963 1964 1965 (Est,) 

.. 1 ( in thousands ) 

Total available for assistance to repatriates^/ $7l4 $402 $467 $373 

PROGRAM STATISTICS 1962 I.963 1964 1965 (Est.) 

Expenditures (fiscal year basis) 
Mentally 111 Repatriates : 

Hospitalization cos ts $194,295 $230,390 $237,331 $275,800 

Patient years of care 59.4 60.0 53. 1 56. 

Miscellaneous costs $1,006 $815 $3,055 $2,200 

Total cases provided assistance 78 88 79 83 

Other Repatriates (i.e., non- 
mentally ill) :~ 
From Cuba : 

Expenditures for maintenance $214,859 $107,748 $76,945 $33,200 
Average monthly number of cases 130 73 52 22 
Other costs (medical; trans- 
portation; etc.) $54,36o $42,793 $20,579 $17,700 

From Other Countries : 

Expenditures for medical and 

nursing home cases $4,549 $19,956 $6,9l6 $9,300 

Other costs (maintenance; trans- 
portation; etc.) $4,404 $9,619 $33,143 $34,800 
Total cases provided assistance 34 40 96 106 

l/ Positions (6) and administrative funds authorized beginning in fiscal year 
1962 for administering this program were treated as comparative transfers for 
fiscal years 1962 and 1963, "Salaries and Expenses, Bureau of Family Services," 
in the President's budget for fiscal year 1964. Data on BFS statistical 
summary adjusted beginning with fiscal year 1962, to include positions and 
administrative funds- related to administration of repatriation program. 



II - 28l 



Bureau of Family Services — Civil Defense Emergency Welfare Services 

PROGRAM Nationwide guidance to States in planning a program of essential 
OBJECTIVE welfare aid and services to assure availability of the necessi- 
ties of life to the homeless and others in need of help in the 
event of enemy attack or the threat of enemy attack. This in- 
cludes the following areas: lodging; feeding; clothing; regis- 
tration and inquiry; help in locating and reuniting individuals 
and families; care of groups needing special services, such as 
children separated from their families, the aged, the handicapped; 
financial assistance; and all other feasible emergency welfare 
aid and services. 

EXTENT OF Many States are in the early stages of emergency welfare program 
PROBLEM development and need national leadership and assistance in de- 
veloping their programs more fully and in coordinating them with 
national objectives. Every community in the nation needs to pre- 
pare to carry out the program of Emergency Welfare Services, even 
though all or any part of it may never have to be put into opera- 
tion. Since there might be little or no warning before an attack 
and it cannot be foreseen where bombs would drop or fallout grow 
dangerous, action must be based on the following assumptions: 
any locality might be hit; any locality might have to receive and 
care for persons from other more dangerous areas; any locality 
might be isolated for an indefinite period. 

PRESENT There is continuing emphasis on development of community capa- 
PROGRAM bility to provide essential emergency welfare services, especially 
SCOPE in connection with community fallout shelters. A "Training Sylla- 
bus on Social Service and Emergency Conditions" is soon to be is- 
sued. Considerable individual and group consultation with State 
departments of public welfare and local components and with rela- 
ted agencies in the strengthening of emergency welfare plans and 
readiness is planned. Six manuals containing guide materials will 
be issued in final form in 1964. Cooperation with and assistance 
to national voluntary welfare agencies in stimulating support and 
interest of their affiliates in this program are an essential and 
continuing activity. 

LEGAL Sec. 201(b) of the Federal Civil Defense Act of 1950, as amended, 
BASIS (64 Stat. 1245; 50 U.S.C. App. 228l (b)) provides for delegation 
of civil defense functions to Government agencies having closely 
related functions. The full range of civil defense emergency 
welfare service was formally assigned to HEW by Executive Order 
11001, signed by the President on February 16, 1962. 

SOURCE OF The Bureau is reimbursed for the cost of the CDEWS program by the 
FUNDS Office of Emergency Planning. 

ADVISORY Various ad hoc, technical, consultative, and advisory groups are 
GROUPS used. 



II - 282 



Statistical Summary — Civil Defense Emergency Welfare Services 
DIRECTOR OF BUREAU ; Fred H. Steininger 
ORGANIZATION 



Unit 

Office of Director 



1/ 



Employees 
12 



PERSONNEL 

Paid employment 

In D. C. area 
Outside D. C. area 



I960 1961 1962 1963 1964 
19 



25 " 24^ 12 



17 
7 



16 
9 



14 
10 



8 
4 



FUNDS (fiscal year) 

For Direct Operations : 
Allotment (1960-1963); 
Reimbursement (1964-1965) 



I960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1963 (Est.) 
(in thousands) 



$160 $238 $265 $276 $207 $196 



PROGRAM DATA— Extent of Responsibilities Carried by State Welfare Agencies: 

(Note: The information below was compiled as of May 1964) 

—In all jurisdictions, emergency welfare duties are assigned to State de- 
partments of public welfare. 

— Only about 25 administrative and professional persons of approximately 
10,000 employees in headquarters offices of State welfare departments are 
reported to have full-time emergency welfare assignments. 

— Fifteen States had at least one full-time professional person assigned to 
emergency welfare on the headquarters staff of the State welfare department. 

—An additional 23 States had only part-time professional persons assigned to 
emergency welfare on the headquarters staff of the State welfare department. 

l/ Emergency Welfare Services was a staff unit within the Office of Director, 
Bureau of Family Services, until June 30, 1964. Effective July 1, 1964, the 
unit became a part of the Division of Program Operations, BFS. 

2/ Includes one position which was then assigned to the Office of Commissioner, 
Social Security Administration, i.e., before creation of the Welfare Adminis- 



tration, and one to the Children's Bureau. 
2/ Includes one position assigned to the Children's Bureau. 



II - 283 



Office of Juvenile Delinquency and Youth Development 



PROGRAM 
OBJECTIVES 



EXTENT OF 
PROBLEM 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



To support new and improved techniques aimed at the control 
and prevention of juvenile delinquency through demon- 
stration projects, and training programs, and to provide 
technical assistance services. 

Beginning in 1949, there has been a steady increase in 
juvenile delinquency each year except for a slight decrease 
in 1961. The increase in delinquency cases has almost 
always exceeded the increases in child population. Based 
on F.B.I, data, it is estimated that the police arrested 
over 1.2 million juveniles in 1963, or about 4.4 percent of 
the juvenile population, aged 10 through 17. While delin- 
quency in the United States is concentrated in urban areas 
both in numbers and in rates — it also presents serious prob- 
lems in the rural areas. 

Responsibilities include administration of a small number of 
comprehensive demonstration projects which recognize the 
multiple causes of delinquency and attack them through a 
program which coordinates all relevant public and private 
organizations in the community- -schools, health and welfare 
agencies, the courts and other law enforcement agencies, 
housing, and recreation — as well as the people who live in 
the target area. In addition, support is given to limited 
action programs which promise new and imaginative ideas in 
the control and treatment of delinquency. In all such pro- 
jects, evaluation is built in so that useful programs can be 
continued and unsuccessful efforts can be discarded. The 
training grant program is administered with emphases on 
creativity, innovation, and experimentation in the develop- 
ment of curricula and techniques of instruction; on an inter- 
disciplinary and interagency approach; on valid evaluative 
methods of program objectives; on transferability of results 
to other areas; and on local university and community support. 
Additional duties include technical assistance services to 
interested public and other non-profit groups. The program 
is carried out in consultation with the President's Committee 
on Juvenile Delinquency and Youth Crime (an interdepartmental 
committee consisting of the Attorney General and the 
Secretaries of Labor and of Health, Education and Welfare) 
which was established for this purpose. As provided in the 
1964 amendments, there will be a special study of school 
attendance and child labor laws. 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



The Juvenile Delinquency and Youth Offences Control Act of 
1961 (Public Law 87-274, as amended by Public Law 88-368) . 



SOURCE OF 
FUNDS 



Annual Congressional appropriation. 



ADVISORY 1< Demonstration Project Review Panel; 2. Training Program 
GROUPS Technical Review Panel. These are interdisciplinary groups 
of non-governmental experts. 



II - 284 



OFFICE OF JUVENILE DELINQUENCY AND YOUTH DEVELOPMENT - Statistical Summary 



DIRECTOR OF PROGRAM: 




Bernard Russell 








ORGANIZATION 




Unit 




Employees 




Office of Juvenile Delinquency 
and Youth Development 


32 




PERSONNEL 




1962 


1963 


1964 




Paid employment 




27 


12 


31 




In D. C. area 
Outside D. C. area 




10 
17 


10 
9 


27 
5 




FUNDS (fiscal vear) 

Appropriations 
Obligations 




1262 

$8,200 
6,366 


1963 
(in 
$5,810 
5,682 


1964 
thousands) 

$6,950 
6,852 


mi <E»t.) 

$11,500 
11,500 


PROGRAM STATISTICS 




1962 


1963 


1264 


1965 


Demonstration project 
applications: 
Reviewed 
Approved 


131 
10 


20 
10 


33 
18 


— 


Training program 
applications: 
Reviewed 
Approved 




106 
26 


92 
38 


91 
40 


— 



II - 285 



CUBAN REFUGEE PROGRAM 



PROGRAM 
OBJECTIVES 



EXTENT OF 
PROBLEM 



PRESENT 
PROGRAM 
SCOPE 



To provide health, educational, and welfare assistance to 
Cuban refugees in the United States. 

To provide for the resettlement of the refugees from Miami, 
Florida, to other parts of the 'Nation where they will have 
opportunities to put their skills to use and to build new 
lives for themselves and their children during their exile 
from their homeland. 

Thousands of Cuban refugees have fled from their homeland 
to the United States since the Castro regime came to power 
January 1, 1959. The vast majority have arrived in Miami, 
in a state of destitution after having been stripped of 
their assets and possessions by the Cuban government. 
Recognizing the refugees as a national responsibility, the 
Federal Government developed a program to aid them, to help 
them to become self-supporting during their exile, and to 
alleviate the burden on the Miami area. 

The Cuban Refugee Program was established early in 1961 by 
direction of the President. Responsibility for the admin- 
istration of the program is delegated by the Secretary of 
Health, Education, and Welfare to the Commissioner of Welfare. 

The program, as it has developed, provides the following: 
financial assistance and health services to needy refugees in 
Miami and the surrounding area of Dade County; funds to meet 
a share of the extra expenses incurred by the Dade County 
public school system in accommodating the refugee children; 
funds to enable the Dade County public school system to pro- 
vide English instruction and vocational courses for adult 
refugees; special retraining projects for selected profession- 
ally-trained refugees such as physicians, lawyers, and 
teachers; the cost of foster care of refugee children who 
have come to the United States unaccompanied by parents or 
relatives; and loans to needy Cuban college students in the 
United States. 

Resettlement of refugees is carried out by four national 
voluntary agencies working under contract with the Federal 
Government. The Cuban Refugee Program provides funds to 
cover the following: Administrative expenses of these 
agencies; transportation costs of refugees to the city of 
resettlement; and, for refugees who are receiving public 
assistance in Miami at the time of resettlement, a transition 
allowance of $100 for a family or $60 for a single person. 



II - 286 



If a resettled refugee should require financial assistance 
because of loss of job or severe medical expenses, public 
assistance is made available in the city of resettlement 
through the local office of the State welfare department, 
which is then reimbursed from Federal funds. 



PARTICI- 
PATING 
AGENCIES 



LEGAL 
BASIS 



Financial assistance to refugees in the Miami area is pro- 
vided on the basis of the same standards as apply to other 
residents of Florida. The maximum amounts for which needy 
refugees may be eligible is $100 a month for a family and 
$60 a month for a single person who is not part of a family 
unit. In actual practice, the average amounts paid are be- 
low the maximums. This aspect of the program is carried out 
by the Cuban Refugee Assistance Unit of the Florida State 
Department of Public Welfare, acting as the agent of HEW. 

Similarly, resettled refugees who may become in need of 
financial assistance are eligible on the basis of the same 
standards as apply to other residents of the States in which 
they have been resettled. 

HEW has established a Cuban Refugee Center in Miami, where 
refugees are registered and processed. The facilities of 
the Center also include: a medical dispensary; an employ- 
ment unit which analyses the occupational skills of the 
refugees; and offices of the four voluntary agencies which 
participate in the resettlement program. 

In order to avoid setting up a large separate agency to 
administer the refugee program, the Department makes full 
use of the facilities of existing agencies. These include 
HEW's Public Health Service, Office of Education, Bureau of 
Family Services, and Children's Bureau; the Bureau of Employ- 
ment Security of the U.S. Department of Labor; the Florida 
State Department of Public Welfare; the Dade County Board of 
Public Instruction; the Dade County Department of Public 
Health; and State and local welfare agencies. 

The four national voluntary agencies participating in the 
resettlement program are Catholic Relief Services of the 
National Catholic Welfare Conference; Church World Service of 
the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the U.S.A.; 
United HIAS Service of the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society; 
and the International Rescue Committee (non-sectarian). 

The over-all program is carried out under the Migration and 
Refugee Assistance Act of 1962, Public Law 87-510 (22 U.S.C. 
2601), enacted June 28, 1962, with funds appropriated under 
that Act. Prior to the enactment of this law, the program 
was carried out with funds made available under the Mutual 
Security Act of 1954, as amended (22 U.S.C. 1951), and the 
Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended (22 U.S.C. 2151, 

note h). 



II - 287 



Cuban Refugee Program — Statistical Summary 



DIRECTOR OF PROGRAM: John Frederick Thomas 
ORGANIZATION: 



PERSONNEL (as of June 30) 1961 1962 1963 1964 

Paid Employment 3£ 82 104, 101 

In D. C. Area 1 7 18 19 

Outside D. C. Area 38 75 86 82 



FUNDS (fiscal year) 1961^ 1962^ 1963^ 1964^ / 1965& / 

(In thousands) 

TOTAL $4,089 $38,557 $70,110 $53,800 $42,400 



Basic Authorities: 

a/ Mutual Security Act of 1954, as amended 
b/ Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended 
sj Migration and Refugee Assistance Act of 1962 



PROGRAM STATISTICS 

Number of refugees registered at the Cuban Refugee Center, 
Miami, Florida » from start of program, February 1, 1961, 
through June 26, 1964 172,572 

Number of refugees resettled, from start of program, 

February 1, 1961, through June 26, 1964 79.230&' 



& Resettlements have been made in over 1,800 communities in all 50 States, 
the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Virgin 
Islands, and several foreign countries. 



■'"'- "" ^-^ * U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1965 O - 778-104 



RELATED PUBLICATIONS 

of the 

U. S. Department of 

HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE 

Office of the Assistant Secretary (for Legislation) 

Office of Program Analysis 





10 Center Drive 

Bethesda, MD 20892-1150 

301-496-1080 



e BACKGROUND: purposes, program developments, and legal 
basis 

• FINANCIAL ASPECTS: formulas, State matching require- 
ments, and funds allocated 



e FEATURE ARTICLES on important problems and issues in 

health, education, and welfare 

• CURRENT STATISTICAL INFORMATION presented through 

charts, tables, 
brief text, and 
source notes 



e FURNISHES PERSPECTIVE on long-term developments and 

projections in health, education, 
and welfare, and related fields 

e STATE DATA AND RANKINGS issued in separate volume 



e BACKGROUND PAPERS analyzing program developments 

and needs, selected from monthly 
Indicators 



HEALTH, 
EDUCATION, 

AND 

WELFARE 



STATISTICS AND SUMMARY BACKGROUND information in 

handy reference 



NIH LIBRARY 
4 0056 9871 



format 



EDGE INDEX 



3 1496 00179 2228 



This Edge Index is designed to facilitate use 
of the Handbook on Programs by matching bars at 
the beginning of the Chapter for each organiza- 
tion: 



DEPARTMENTAL SUMMARY 
(Office of the Secretary and 
Special Institutions) 



OFFICE OF EDUCATION 



FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION 



PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE 



SAINT ELIZABETHS HOSPITAL 



SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION 



VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION ADMINISTRATION 



WELFARE ADMINISTRATION